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Tells it All - Namibian Sun

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: Chinese too cheap
  • Chinese too cheapChinese too cheapLocal competitors bemoan motor spares prices Lin Guo Qi says he is here to do business and if others are charging their customers higher prices, it is not his concern, as he is helping poor Namibians. A Chinese national who runs a motor spares shop at Oshakati has come under fire from competitors and politicians, who say his products and services are too cheap.

    A comparison of prices at various motors spares shops in Oshakati and Ongwediva shows that QQ Motors charges N$150 for wheel alignment on a sedan and N$200 for a bakkie, while competitors charge between N$270 and N$400, respectively, for the same services.

    QQ Motors charges N$50 for its tyre repair service, which cost as much as N$90 at other outlets.

    Lin Guo Qi, the owner of QQ Motors, situated in Oshakati's Oshoopala informal area, says Namibians are cash-strapped and should be allowed to buy at places their pockets can afford.

    Last week a number of stakeholders complained to Namibian Sun about QQ Motors, which sells spare parts, used and new tyres and provides tyre repair and wheel alignment services.

    Most the complainants were entrepreneurs who sell second-hand tyres or do repairs.

    They argued that they have lost a number of customers to QQ Motors, because of its cheap prices.

    Other detractors, among them politicians, feel that government has failed Namibians, by allowing foreigners to enter industries that local people venture into to take care of their families.

    One such local politician, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said it is unacceptable that government allows a foreign-owned business to provide services that locals have been doing for decades.

    The source argued this was adding to the country's high unemployment rate and poverty levels.

    “The country is already not having money and yet we allow foreigners to make money which they will take with to their country of origin. It is not being xenophobic, but the reality is that Namibians are suffering under the watch of this government, which is allowing these uncalled for things,” he said.

    “How will we address national issues such as unemployment and poverty in our country if breadwinners are competing with people from other countries, who come with money to set up businesses and make more money to take back with them?”

    When approached for comment, Lin said he does not understand the basis of his detractors arguments, as prices always differ from shop to shop.

    He explained he has been in business for two and half months and had opted to keep his prices low in order to establish a client base.

    He also confirmed he gets his products from China at cheaper prices.

    Lin further questioned why people should complain about his prices, if the Namibian government had allowed him to register his business in 2013.

    “I am here to do business. If others are charging their customers higher that is not my concern. I am in Namibia to help those that cannot afford the high prices.”

    Making reference to the state of the Namibian economy, Lin said it is a shame for Namibians to complain about cheap prices when people do not have money.

    “For those that want the good brands of tyres I don't have yet, they can go to the shops where they can get them but do not forget that taxi drivers who cannot afford those expensive tyres also need to be catered for and that's where QQ Motors comes in,” he said.

    “People should buy where they can afford.”

    Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry (NCCI) northern branch chairperson, Tomas Iindji, said the issue was never brought to the attention of his office.

    “This is news to my office,” Iindji said.

    When asked how the NCCI can intervene in the matter, Iindji said he will have to send a team to do a preliminary analysis.

    “In terms of the pricing I really cannot comment as I need to send my team do the preliminary analysis and an investigation thereafter. So I would rather not comment at the moment, as I need to be well-informed.”

    Iindji, however, said pricing should not be the initial basis of the investigation, but that the bigger picture should be looked at.

    “The starting point should be whether we really need that business. We also have to ask if it's owned by locals or foreigners and all those things are part of our investigations.

    “We also have to look at the standard as well and by that it means we need to bring in other stakeholders such as the Namibia Competition Commission (NaCC),” Iindji said.

    The NaCC was established in terms of the Competition Act 2 of 2003 and regulates competition issues across all sectors of the Namibian economy.

    In terms of the Act, the commission is entrusted as the principal institution to promote and safeguard fair competition in Namibia by promoting the efficiency, adaptability and development of the Namibian economy.

    KENYA KAMBOWE

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: Company news
  • Company newsCompany news Papa John's cuts costs

    Papa John’s International Inc on Friday said it would lower royalties and fees charged to its US and Canadian franchisees as sales at the US pizza chain decline following the acrimonious exit of it founder.

    The company will cut royalties, food-service pricing and online fees through 2018, while also funding the rebranding of the chain.

    This comes days after the company said its North American comparable sales for July had fallen 10.5% and would continue falling in the coming months.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    Automakers balk at US request

    Two automotive trade groups on Friday raised “significant concerns” over the US government’s request for confidential business information as it probes whether automotive imports pose a national security risk, according to a letter seen by Reuters.

    The US Commerce Department survey demands sweeping details on operations of major US and foreign automakers, including planned changes to US facilities, revenue for specific classes of products and use of auto parts. The survey says companies that do not comply could face fines or criminal charges.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    Lee looks to exit denim business

    VF Corp is exploring strategic options for its denim business that could include a sale or spin off of its Lee and Wrangler jeans brands, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday, citing people familiar with the matter.

    Greensboro, North Carolina-based VF, which also makes Vans shoes, rakes in more than US$2.5 billion in annual revenue. Its jeans business has seen demand slip as big retailers including Walmart stock more of their own private label brands.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    Ethiopian Airlines frontrunner in Nigeria tender

    Ethiopian Airlines is the frontrunner to set up and manage a new national carrier for Nigeria, its chief executive said on Friday.

    “We are among a small group with an interest in establishing a national carrier (in Nigeria)...we do not know the results (of the tender), though we are frontrunners,” chief executive Tewolde Gebremariam told a news conference.

    The state-owned carrier has outpaced regional competitors Kenya Airways and South African Airways to become Africa’s largest airline by revenue and profit, according to the International Air Transport Association.

    Taxify bets on motorcycles and rickshaws

    Taxify, an Estonian ride-hailing company aiming to take on Uber in emerging markets, will invest millions of euros in East Africa in the next five years with a strategy focused on motorised rickshaws and motorcycles, it said on Thursday.

    The company, which already operates in five cities in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania and will continue to offer regular car rides, said it saw the best opportunity for growth via taxi services in locally popular forms of motorised transport.

    -Nampa/Reuters

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    Celebrating cultural diversity as oneCelebrating cultural diversity as oneUniversities should promote cultural festivals - Tjivikua Culture shapes our identity and influences our behaviour. Justicia Shipena



    Cultural diversity makes us accept, and even to some extent, integrate and assimilate with other cultures.

    It has become very important in today's world.

    Whether we work or study or even stay at home, our chances of interacting with people from various races, ethnic groups and cultures is far greater now than it has been ever before.

    Most universities celebrate cultural diversity by hosting a cultural ­festival for their university communities.

    The Zone attended the Namibia ­University of Science and ­Technology (Nust) Cultural Festival and spoke to the students about its importance.

    Held under the theme 'Celebrating cultural diversity as one', the festival was aimed at encouraging students to take pride in their diverse traditions, in addition to embracing those of others from 6 to 10 August.

    European Union (EU) ambassador to Namibia, Jana Hybášková, during the opening ceremony singled out a project in which tablet computers will be designed for the Ovahimba.

    She also highlighted the importance of being unified in diversity and making people aware of what it means to speak about culture in their own words.

    Nust vice-chancellor Tjama Tjivikua said the university is mindful of the potential inherent in promoting cultural diversity, when enrolling students and recruiting staff members.

    “As visionaries we always require new thinking and we also value good connections to elevate our quest to become a world-class university,” he said.



    Connection

    Tjivikua said those connections are evident everywhere and the cultural festival serves as an authentic explosion of colour through various cultural displays.

    The university also held an international cuisine day, where different traditions were showcased through traditional food.

    Jessey Angula and Elizabeth Mansanga took home the coveted titles of Mr and Miss Nust, respectively.

    The Zone spoke to different students regarding their view on cultural diversity and what role cultural festivals play in their lives.

    Meriam Immanuel, a first-year student, said that for those who want to learn about other cultures, but do not know where to start, a great place to begin is picking up a book and reading about the cultures that interest them.

    Another was attending cultural festivals.

    The best way to learn, though, is through face-to-face interactions with a person of the culture you would like to learn more about, she said.

    “Most of us enjoy one aspect of cultural diversity, which is food from different cultures and regions, and this can also be a good way to start learning about new cultures.”

    Caroline Garises, also a first-year student, said that Nust Cultural Festival is an innovative way for different cultures to showcase their unique attributes.

    It showed that various cultures, both local and international, can live together harmoniously, providing for a very diverse society in which students are able to learn and grow through experiencing the customs of their neighbours.

    “Above all it showed how truly ­beautiful the African nation is,” she said.

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: Hunger for SADC
  • Hunger for SADCHunger for SADCRegion to see food insecurity Predictions are that food insecurity will, at least in part, reign over several areas in SADC, including Namibia. Food insecurity in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) may occur despite good rainfall received in the 2016/17 crop season, Domingos Gove, the director of food agriculture and natural resources has said.

    He made the remarks on the eve of the start of the SADC Heads of State Summit which kicks off this week in Windhoek

    According to Gove, the rainfall during 2017/18 was influenced by La Nina, which led to normal rainfall conditions; but there were dry spells in January, mainly in Botswana, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    “This affected crop production which was reduced compared to the previous crop season (2016/17). For example maize production in South Africa decreased 23%; and dropped by 34% in Zambia.”

    “The food security situation in the region is good, but situations of food insecurity may occur in more vulnerable communities, which includes Namibia,” she said.

    According to him, although crop prices are still lower, they may increase with a shortage of food production.

    Despite this warning, the Namibia Early Warning and Food Information Unit of the agriculture ministry previously said that good harvests were reported throughout the country despite poor rainfall received during most of the last rainy season, The Namibian reported.

    According to the report, maize production in communal areas of the Zambezi, Kavango East and West regions, recorded an increase of 10% over last season and about 4% above the average production.

    “In contrast, maize production in the two Kavango regions showed an improvement of 20% above last season's harvest, but still remained 72% below the average production,” the report said.

    In the commercial farming areas, maize production recorded a significant reduction of about 19% over last season's harvest, but was still 41% above the average production.

    In terms of food security in the country, the report says the available cereal for the current consumption period was estimated at 200 500 metric tonnes.

    This consists of 15 400 tonnes of wheat, 96 800 tonnes of white maize and 88 300 tonnes of pearl millet and sorghum.

    OGONE TLHAGE

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: Abandoned baby's mom returns
  • Abandoned baby's mom returnsAbandoned baby's mom returns The 27-year-old woman, who last week abandoned her newborn baby boy at the Oshakati Intermediate Hospital, has been reunited with her child.

    On Friday, the Oshana police used various media platforms to trace Selma Haufiku from Ohangwena, who gave birth last Wednesday to the baby boy, but abandoned him shortly after she was discharged on Thursday from ward 14, where she gave birth.

    Haufiku only took her belongings and erased her details from the baby's birth passport, before fleeing.

    However, according to Oshana police spokesperson, Inspector Petrus Iimbili, the mother returned to the hospital on Friday in the company of her family and her employer, as she is a domestic worker at Iiviyongo village in the Ohangwena Region.

    As for the motive for her abandoning her child, Iimbili said Haufiku had told the police and social workers she had done this due to the father being unwilling to support the baby.

    Iimbili said Haufiku had now returned home with her child.

    KENYA KAMBOWE

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: Rand loses 4%
  • Rand loses 4% Rand loses 4% In early trade in emerging market rout The rand lost 4% to the dollar in early trade on Monday as it continued to be dragged lower by the Turkish lira and Russian rouble. The sell-off in emerging market assets will continue to be broad based for now and all one can do is ride it out - Bianca Botes, Peregrine Treasury Solutions The local currency opened at R14.13/US dollar and was changing hands at R14.65 to the greenback at 07:46. By 08:32 it had strengthened somewhat to trade at R14.37/US dollar.

    Bianca Botes of Peregrine Treasury Solutions said in a morning note that there was little local policymakers can do to assist at the moment.

    "The rand is being subjected to global sentiment – or rather lack thereof – in the emerging market space [...] The sell-off in emerging market assets will continue to be broad based for now and all one can do is ride it out."

    "There is some rand support to be found at R15.00, which has become the next big psychological level, while a range of R14.50/R15.00/US$ can be expected."

    -Fin24

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    New Swakop junior mayor chosen New Swakop junior mayor chosen Leandrea Louw



    Celline Penda, a grade 11 learner at Namib High School, was chosen as the new junior town council mayor of Swakopmund.

    Penda has been serving on the junior town council for the past two years, starting off as a junior member.

    “It was earlier this year that we were elected as senior councillors and were eligible to acquire executive positions. Each year the juniors have a project to complete, where the seniors can see who is eligible for the different positions on the executive.

    “Our project was when we visited and donated food to the Tears of Hope orphanage earlier this year. We made them lunch and spent the day with them,” Penda said.

    She further explained that before the elections, the outgoing senior councillors interviewed the newly elected seniors.

    “Basically we vote for each other, for the different positions, and the senior councillors then decide who is best for the job. They take into account your behaviour outside the council as well.”

    Penda’s main plan this year is to bring the youth of Swakopmund together.

    “I’m in the process of planning a matric cup for next month, where learners from both private and government schools will participate in soccer, rugby and netball. At this event I want to create an atmosphere where everyone enjoys each other’s company, and doesn’t look at the school they’re from or the colour they are.”

    Her other main events includes the Santa Shoe Box Project.

    “I’d really like to appeal to the community of Swakopmund to fill up a box with items a child needs. This will help us make Christmas a joyous occasion for a lot of orphans and vulnerable children in our town.”

    She advises that people need to get out of their comfort zones and try something new every day.

    “Do not listen to what people have to say about certain things. They had their own experiences. You can have your own experiences as well.

    “Fear has two parts to it - one is walk away and never know what the outcome might have been or try your best and know the outcome.

    “As the junior town council, we are just somebodies trying to make someday possible. Instead of having wishbones, we have backbones, and we are going to stay true to this.

    “To the youth, stop waiting on life. You’re town does not owe you recreational facilities, your parents do not owe you fun. You owe the world something. You owe the world your time, energy and talent, so get up, study, do the dishes and read your books - just do something. Do something with your time that doesn’t necessarily have to benefit you,” Penda added.

    Her deputy mayor is Aurielle Louw from Pro-Ed Academy, the public relations officer is Rivaldo Gertze from Namib High, the secretary is Johanna Hipangwela from Swakopmund Secondary School and the treasurer is Mauricia Möwes from Namib High.

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: HWPL chairman visits SADC
  • HWPL chairman visits SADCHWPL chairman visits SADCLee expected in Windhoek this Friday The aim of HWPL is create positive and lasting change internationally, through uniting major youth associations around the world. Tunohole Mungoba

    War Veteran, Man Hee Lee is expected to be in Windhoek Friday at the Safari Court Hotel, to address Namibian youth and all their representatives. The side event is scheduled to take place on Saturday, under the theme ‘We Are One’, distinguished youth leaders from southern Africa urgently call on the SADC heads and secretariat to engage youth on pressing issues pertaining to peace and security in the region.

    Heavenly Culture, World Peace, Restoration of Light (HWPL) chairman, Man Hee Lee, arrived in Johannesburg on 9 August and was welcomed at OR Tambo International Airport by number of young South Africans.

    The HWLP was founded by Lee, who is a war veteran. It is active in 111 countries, including 40 countries in Africa. The southern African headquarters is in Cape Town.

    “The purpose of my visiting here in Africa is to create positive and lasting change internationally, through uniting major youth associations around the world,” Lee said.

    “We support the development of their communities through promoting peace and encouraging them to set the example in educating and motivating their nation's active pursuit of peace.”

    HWPL has two wings, the International Peace Youth Group (IPYG) and the International Women’s Peace Group (IWPG), which both play a role in achieving global peace.

    The IPYG focuses on the role young people can play in making sure achieving peace is a priority in their countries.

    It has been active in peace promotion in the land of the Brave, after the group collaborated with Namibia’s National Youth Council and the Namibia Youth Development Organisation.

    This was done by spearheading the ‘We Are One’ intergenerational dialogue in support and recognition of this year's 38th Southern African Development Community (SADC) Summit of Heads of State and Government, under theme ‘Promoting infrastructure development and youth empowerment for sustainable development’.

    “For world peace to become a reality this is the duty of all youth, everywhere. The only way to stop the fighting and the pointless, tragic deaths is to stop fighting,” he said.

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    Food bank rollout in full swingFood bank rollout in full swing Training has started for Rundu food bank street committee members, to pave the way for the programme to be rolled out in the north.

    In July, food banks were launched in the Hardap and

    //Karas regions - at Mariental, Keetmanshoop and Lüderitz - following the completion of a pilot programme in Khomas.

    The Kavango East regional street committee training will take place at Rundu, following the completion of similar training in Kavango West last month.

    The street committee teams will be responsible for the identification of beneficiaries and the eventual distribution of food items in their respective urban areas.

    At the launch of the training this week, the deputy poverty eradication minister, Reverend Aino Kapewangolo, said food banks are one way of addressing extreme poverty, “since hunger is the lowest level of poverty”.

    She noted an assessment to evaluate the impact of food banks on household food security, conducted by the University of Namibia (Unam) in collaboration with the ministry, found that the food banks established in numerous constituencies in the Khomas Region have had a “significant impact on household food security”.

    Particularly, the food bank scheme has been effective in addressing hunger for beneficiaries without formal employment.

    “About 90% of the beneficiaries were food insecure before the food bank intervention,” she said, adding 62% of the beneficiaries had become food secure as a result of the food bank intervention. About 15 519 households, representing nearly

    68 000 individuals, were benefiting in seven Khomas constituencies by the end of the pilot phase of the food bank programme.

    Following a new list of more “stringent criteria”, the ministry whittled down the number of beneficiary households by 5 000, in order to “ensure that those faced with extreme hunger poverty are benefiting”.

    Kapewangolo said in terms of financial sustainability, the food bank programme is set to remain affordable with the current budget allocations for a three-year period.

    JANA-MARI SMITH

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: 4 200 Mandrax tablets seized
  • 4 200 Mandrax tablets seized4 200 Mandrax tablets seized More than 4 000 Mandrax tablets were seized when a truck driver was searched at Hosea Kutako International Airport on Friday.

    According to the police the street value of the confiscated Mandrax is N$504 600.

    A 59-year-old truck driver for Absolute Logistics, who had been on his way to Gobabis, was arrested.

    The 4 200 Mandrax tablets were found in the cargo bay of the international airport just outside Windhoek during a police search.

    In other crime news, two domestic violence incidents ended in fatal stabbings over the weekend.

    At Omaruru, a 22-year-old woman allegedly stabbed her 23-year-old boyfriend to death in a fight at her shack after they had returned from a party on Saturday.

    The man was stabbed three times, once in the chest and twice in the back, killing him instantly. The woman was arrested.

    At Onandjaba in the Okalongo constituency of the Omusati Region, a man allegedly stabbed his 25-year-old girlfriend to death on Friday.

    According to the police a 23-year-old Angolan man stabbed Ndatilaowala Kundi six times in the chest, stomach, arms, and neck.

    The motive for the attack is unknown. The suspect fled but was arrested at the nearby Olupandu village. Kundi was from Othsokwiyu village in the Ondjiva area in Angola.

    At Karasburg, a 28-year-old woman was allegedly raped by a 26-year-old man at the railway crossing behind Namib Oase on Saturday. She was allegedly overpowered on her way from a shebeen in the Westerkim location. The suspect has been arrested.

    At Rundu a woman was raped, allegedly by her 33-year-old nephew, on Friday. According to the police the suspect entered the woman's room while she was sleeping and raped her. The woman, whose age was not given, resides in the Ndama location in the San community area. The suspect was arrested.

    Five men and one woman were arrested on Friday at Dorado Park in Windhoek for trying to sell a live pangolin. The suspects are aged between 29 and 38.

    Two other men, aged 47 and 21, were arrested on Sunday after they were found in possession of a pangolin skin at Okahandja Park in Windhoek.

    ELLANIE SMIT

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: Mnangagwa remains president
  • Mnangagwa remains presidentMnangagwa remains presidentZim waits for outcome of election challenge Emmerson Mnangagwa will represent Zimbabwe at the SADC Summit in Windhoek this week while the country's constitutional court considers an opposition application to annul the recent elections. Emmerson Mnangagwa will remain the president of Zimbabwe with full powers until there is a new president to be sworn in, Zimbabwean foreign minister Sibusiso Moyo said yesterday.

    The main opposition party in Zimbabwe on Friday filed a legal challenge against the outcome of the country's first election since the forced exit of former president Robert Mugabe in November last year.

    Zimbabwe's main opposition leader, Nelson Chamisa, called on the Constitutional Court to nullify the election results. As a result, the inauguration of Mnangagwa as president is now on hold.

    Moyo declined to comment on the fact that international election observers as well as opposition parties said the 30 July elections had no credibility.

    “I will not comment much, because this is something which is in the courts. They have filed a court case and therefore we are going to abide by the court's findings,” Moyo said.

    He added that Mnangagwa would represent Zimbabwe at the 38th SADC Summit of Heads of State in Windhoek this week.

    Moyo maintained that the election was the most peaceful, free and fair one that the country had ever seen since the dawn of the Mugabe era in 1980.

    Moyo also responded to Amnesty International's call on Zimbabwean authorities to launch a prompt and effective investigation into the army's killing of three protesters and wounding of scores of others following post-election violence, saying it would be addressed.

    “The investigation into the loss of lives will be established immediately after the inauguration so that it is implemented by a credible commission of inquiry which should really look into the proportionality of the amount of response used in quelling a really violent protest,” he said.

    It was free – SADC

    SADC has commended the country on the peaceful election process but condemned the loss of lives.

    According to the director of the SADC Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Affairs, Jorge Cardoso, the general observation was that the Zimbabwean election process had been peaceful and that all the fundamental freedoms of citizens were fully respected.

    Addressing the media on Sunday afternoon, Cardoso pointed out that SADC was obligated to intervene in the face of a potential breakdown of law and order in its member states.

    Commenting on a remark that the organisation was regarded as a toothless dog, Cardoso said sometimes intervention measures took longer than expected.

    “Of course we have to be mindful that as an organisation we do not replace institutions in our member states. We have to work with our member states. So there are processes which we need to observe in order for us to work together meaningfully. Sometimes some of the measures we put in place do not immediately have the desired outcome, but we continue to assess member states,” he said.

    JEMIMA BEUKES

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: Take your time
  • Take your timeTake your time Justicia Shipena



    Recently everyone has been overly-interested in my dating life. Nowadays it seems not even one conversation can go by without them asking if I’m seeing anyone. I can always hear the disappointment in someone’s tone when I tell them that I haven’t met anyone since we last talked and in the case of some, we talk almost every day.

    But of course, like any human who obsesses over people’s romantic ventures, a simple “no” is not a satisfactory answer. I must tell them why.

    The reason could be the result of many things. One, I don’t have many guy friends. Two, I give off the “not-interested vibe. And three, I don’t fit the Windhoek “type”.

    I know this last statement may be controversial, and even I even hesitate to write it. I would love to be able to say that girls of all shapes, sizes and colours are loved here. And this may be true, but I don’t think there’s any denying the fact that there is a certain type that is popular. Because I don’t fit into that type, I’ve dealt with a lot of insecurities.

    Even before I was even thinking about dating, the moment I stepped into a place, I became super aware of my appearance because few people here look like me. I am black, tall and petite. My dress sense is weird and I don’t have an athletic body. I am not the type of girl you take one look at and decide to pursue. I know this. And I try not to get caught up in it but it is difficult not to, especially at this age.

    However, I’m not going to go on some long tangent about how everyone is beautiful in their own special way and what really matters is on the inside. As much as that statement is true, it is also false. So instead I’m going to focus on being real, because that’s what my column is all about: Being honest with the reader by being honest with myself.

    While compliments definitely feel good, I don’t think true confidence can come from anywhere but the individual. I feel that confidence can only come when one learns to be okay with yourself. When you block out all other influences and just say: “This is what I’ve got to work with, so I’ll own it”.

    Only then can you exude real poise.

    But blocking other influences is a lot more difficult to do than it seems. In fact, it may be nearly impossible, seeing as they are everywhere in our surroundings - the media, school, work, etc. However, it’s very possible to make these things less important in your everyday life. I won’t say that I’ve mastered this yet, but I’m working on it, and I think for now that’s good enough.

    And while dating is definitely an experience I’d like to have during my last teenage year, it is certainly not a priority of mine. This is an age meant for having fun, for learning, for crafting and discovering. And this earth certainly is not running short of men; so I feel no need to rush, but I can understand my people’s concerns.

    I think they really want me to have that full teenage “experience”, whatever that means.

    And because of that exact reason, I’m very cautious of ridding myself of that mindset before entering the dating scene.

    Because we want to have that teenage “experience” - the one we’ve seen in movies and heard about in our parents’ stories - there’s pressure to do certain things at a certain speed, whether that be drinking, smoking, sex or whatever else.

    During my teenage years, I’ve made sure that whenever I do or participate in anything, it’s because I want to. Not because my friends want to, and not because I’m trying to live up to some ridiculous standard as created by films like Animal House.

    So people will have to wait. I’m not sure till when, but for now, that’ll just have to be sufficient. I don’t mean to come off as some wannabe motivational speaker, but it’s an issue I think is important because it’s an issue I deal with on a daily basis. And as superficial as it may seem, it’s always really detrimental to your self-esteem when you’re consistently feeling like ‘the ugly friend’, ‘the party-pooper” or ‘the third wheel’.

    I actually think this can be a large factor of everyone’s time as a teenager. While of course your main goal here is to get a degree, there is no denying that how much you enjoy that time has a large social aspect. But any relationship you develop with anyone will be difficult if you aren’t comfortable with yourself.

    “You can’t love until you’ve been loved” is a very clichéd statement, so much so that it’s almost painful to write, but it’s true about a lot of things besides love. It’s also a skill, just like learning to be yourself and how to love yourself are skills. So take your time. I’m doing just that.

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  • 08/13/18--16:00: Take your time
  • Take your timeTake your time Justicia Shipena



    Recently everyone has been overly-interested in my dating life. Nowadays it seems not even one conversation can go by without them asking if I'm seeing anyone. I can always hear the disappointment in someone's tone when I tell them that I haven't met anyone since we last talked and in the case of some, we talk almost every day.

    But of course, like any human who obsesses over people's romantic ventures, a simple “no” is not a satisfactory answer. I must tell them why.

    The reason could be the result of many things. One, I don't have many guy friends. Two, I give off the “not-interested” vibe. And three, I don't fit the Windhoek “type”.

    I know this last statement may be controversial, and even I even hesitate to write it. I would love to be able to say that girls of all shapes, sizes and colours are loved here. And this may be true, but I don't think there's any denying the fact that there is a certain type that is popular. Because I don't fit into that type, I've dealt with a lot of insecurities.

    Even before I was even thinking about dating, the moment I stepped into a place, I became super aware of my appearance because few people here look like me. I am black, tall and petite. My dress sense is weird and I don't have an athletic body. I am not the type of girl you take one look at and decide to pursue. I know this. And I try not to get caught up in it but it is difficult not to, especially at this age.

    However, I'm not going to go on some long tangent about how everyone is beautiful in their own special way and what really matters is on the inside. As much as that statement is true, it is also false. So instead I'm going to focus on being real, because that's what my column is all about: Being honest with the reader by being honest with myself.

    While compliments definitely feel good, I don't think true confidence can come from anywhere but the individual. I feel that confidence can only come when one learns to be okay with yourself. When you block out all other influences and just say: “This is what I've got to work with, so I'll own it.”

    Only then can you exude real poise.

    But blocking other influences is a lot more difficult to do than it seems. In fact, it may be nearly impossible, seeing as they are everywhere in our surroundings - the media, school, work, etc. However, it's very possible to make these things less important in your everyday life. I won't say that I've mastered this yet, but I'm working on it, and I think for now that's good enough.

    And while dating is definitely an experience I'd like to have during my last teenage year, it is certainly not a priority of mine. This is an age meant for having fun, for learning, for crafting and discovering. And this earth certainly is not running short of men; so I feel no need to rush, but I can understand my people's concerns.

    I think they really want me to have that full teenage “experience”, whatever that means.

    And because of that exact reason, I'm very cautious of ridding myself of that mindset before entering the dating scene.

    Because we want to have that teenage “experience” - the one we've seen in movies and heard about in our parents' stories - there's pressure to do certain things at a certain speed, whether that be drinking, smoking, sex or whatever else.

    During my teenage years, I've made sure that whenever I do or participate in anything, it's because I want to. Not because my friends want to, and not because I'm trying to live up to some ridiculous standard as created by films like 'Animal House'.

    So people will have to wait. I'm not sure until when, but for now, that'll just have to be sufficient. I don't mean to come off as some wannabe motivational speaker, but it's an issue I think is important because it's an issue I deal with on a daily basis. And as superficial as it may seem, it's always really detrimental to your self-esteem when you're consistently feeling like 'the ugly friend', 'the party-pooper” or 'the third wheel'.

    I actually think this can be a large factor of everyone's time as a teenager. While of course your main goal here is to get a degree, there is no denying that how much you enjoy that time has a large social aspect. But any relationship you develop with anyone will be difficult if you aren't comfortable with yourself.

    “You can't love until you've been loved” is a very clichéd statement, so much so that it's almost painful to write, but it's true about a lot of things besides love. It's also a skill, just like learning to be yourself and how to love yourself are skills. So take your time. I'm doing just that.



    justicia@myzone.com.na

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    Billionaire's huge Nigerian oil refinery likely delayedBillionaire's huge Nigerian oil refinery likely delayedUntil 2022 A huge oil refinery being built in Nigeria by Africa’s richest man is unlikely to start production until 2022, two years later than the target date, sources with direct knowledge of the matter said. In our forecast, we are putting late 2021 at the earliest for some gasoline production but it may slip to 2022- Gary Still, executive director of CITAC The 650 000 barrel per day (bpd) refinery near Lagos, set to be Africa’s biggest, is expected to boost Nigeria’s growth and turn the country from an importer of refined products into an exporter, transforming global trade patterns.

    Billionaire Aliko Dangote, who built his fortune on cement, told Reuters last month he hoped to finish building the refinery in 2019 and to start production in early 2020.

    However, the sources, who have been on the site many times, said they do not expect gasoline or diesel output before early 2022 and even then, many units at the refinery and accompanying petrochemical plant would not be complete.

    Dangote Group Executive Director Devakumar Edwin, who oversees the project, described the suggestion that the refinery is unlikely to start production until 2022 as the product of “someone’s wild imagination”.

    “Ninety-five percent of engineering has been completed, 90% of procurement has been completed.”

    “We started civil works in July last year and we have scheduled 2-1/2 years for mechanical completion,” he said, referring to the point where a plant is ready to be handed over for commissioning.

    Dangote, who expects the project to cost US$12-14 billion, said in July he has raised more than US$4.5 billion.

    “I’ve never seen a refinery of that scale built in two years. It’s highly improbable due to the sequence of events that need to happen, it cannot be fast-tracked safely,” a source advising the Nigerian government said.

    The sources said a refinery on such a scale would likely need five years to complete and the piling underpinning the plant had only started in the second half of last year and would take some more months to complete.

    Extra piling was needed to support the plant’s units in the swampy area, causing an unforeseen delay, the sources said.

    Analysts also anticipate delays owing to the scale of the project in an area with limited infrastructure.

    “In our forecast, we are putting late 2021 at the earliest for some gasoline production but it may slip to 2022,” said Gary Still, executive director of CITAC, a specialist consulting company focused on African downstream energy.

    Fuel shortages are common in Nigeria, despite the country of 180 million people being Africa’s biggest oil producer.

    The existing 445 000 bpd refining system operates well below capacity due to corruption and lack of investment, leaving the state oil firm to import the bulk of its gasoline and gasoil needs paid for with cargoes of crude oil.

    Edwin told Reuters last month that more than half the plant’s output could be exported after covering domestic needs.

    TRICKY LOGISTICS

    The plant will be the world’s largest single-train refinery, meaning it will have only one crude distillation unit (CDU).

    The government adviser said the CDU would not be ready for commissioning until the third or fourth quarter of 2021 at the earliest, and that process would take about six months.

    Major pieces of equipment have yet to arrive or are still being constructed overseas.

    A lack of infrastructure to transport and install oversized equipment and risks from rainy season storms could add unforeseen delays, the government adviser said.

    The refinery project was first announced in 2013 as a smaller plant to be finished in 2016. A site move to Lekki in Lagos state and a currency crisis caused initial delays.

    The first producing unit of the fertiliser plant at the same site is complete but the pipeline that was supposed to bring its key input, natural gas, is not finished, meaning that the end-year start would also be missed, two of the sources said.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    0 0
  • 08/13/18--16:00: Last kick of a dying horse
  • Last kick of a dying horseLast kick of a dying horse The Rally for Democracy and Progress (RDP) has been rocked by mass resignations including that of one of its founders Jeremiah Nambinga. In fact, Nambinga not only resigned as RDP leader, but also dumped the former official opposition by quitting as member, citing ongoing divisions and infighting within the leadership. The party has largely been beset with serious problems shortly after the 2009 general elections. After becoming the official opposition, which included scooping eight National Assembly seats, the party experienced a gradual decline, with its former president Hidipo Hamutenya performing woefully in the 2014 polls. The RDP could only garner a little over 30 000 votes in the presidential elections, while 31 372 Namibians voted for the party in the National Assembly elections, representing a mere 3.5% of the total vote. This pathetic showing not only resulted in the party losing its official opposition status to the DTA, now operating as the Popular Democratic Movement, but the party also lost five seats in the process. The party now faces the major struggle of finding its political relevance since its thumping defeat in 2014 and the ensuing drama, which has seen many senior party leaders defecting back to the ruling party, Swapo. The Namibian political landscape is already dominated by a fragmented and disoriented opposition, with no ideology, and capacity to challenge Swapo’s two-thirds majority. Swapo, with its many weaknesses, will forever be comfortable, as long as there is no serious challenge from the opposition ranks. This makes our politics sterile and poorer, as far as holding power accountable is concerned. RDP is already facing the threat of damaging splits and it will be interesting to see how it regroups ahead of the polls next year. The infighting has already caused them huge damage and until such time that it comes up with alternatives and setting the agenda for the many issues facing Namibians, the party is destined to fail.

    0 0
  • 08/13/18--16:00: Rand loses 4%
  • Rand loses 4% Rand loses 4% The rand lost 4% to the dollar in early trade on Monday as it continued to be dragged lower by the Turkish lira and Russian rouble.

    The sell-off in emerging market assets will continue to be broad based for now and all one can do is ride it out - Bianca Botes, Peregrine Treasury Solutions

    ;

    The local currency opened at R14.13/US dollar and was changing hands at R14.65 to the greenback at 07:46. By 08:32 it had strengthened somewhat to trade at R14.37/US dollar.

    Bianca Botes of Peregrine Treasury Solutions said in a morning note that there was little local policymakers can do to assist at the moment.

    "The rand is being subjected to global sentiment – or rather lack thereof – in the emerging market space [...] The sell-off in emerging market assets will continue to be broad based for now and all one can do is ride it out."

    "There is some rand support to be found at R15.00, which has become the next big psychological level, while a range of R14.50/R15.00/US$ can be expected."

    -Fin24

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    School 'embarrassed' by Hofmeyr's racist anticsSchool 'embarrassed' by Hofmeyr's racist antics The Windhoek Afrikaanse Privaatskool (WAP) says it was not aware that apartheid apologist and perennial public performer of the hated apartheid national anthem, Die Stem, would be performing, when a concert booking was made at the school.

    The concert takes place tomorrow night, with education minister Katrina Hanse-Himarwa expressing shock that WAP has associated itself with Hofmeyr's antics.

    Hofmeyr is currently on a concert tour in Namibia to launch his new album, titled Skree, and has already performed in Tsumeb, Otjiwarongo, Walvis Bay and Gobabis.

    Unconfirmed reports say he performed Die Stem to end off his Walvis Bay concert.

    In South Africa his apartheid apologist stance has been met with stern resistance, with some of his concerts being cancelled.

    During a past visit to Namibia last year, a petition to then home affairs minister Pendukeni Iivula-Ithana mysteriously failed to reach her.





    Hanse-Himarwa said it was unfortunate that Hofmeyr would be performing at WAP.

    She questioned why the school was associating itself with such a controversial character.

    “They know what the stance is against this artist, (yet) they associate themselves. This is disappointing.”

    WAP spokesperson Arno van Wyk denied the school had any knowledge that Hofmeyr would perform on its premises prior to the booking being made.

    According to him, there are people employed by the school that deal with bookings of this nature and often the school is not aware who will use its facilities and for what purpose.

    “On Friday [last week] I was asked about the concert at the school and I enquired what concert (will be taking place). On that Friday I found out that it was rented out to a company called MR Entertainment,” said Van Wyk.

    The school, he said, had no involvement in the concert, except for hiring out the venue.

    “We took a decision to move away from that, we don't want exposure to the show; we don't have anything to do with it.” According to Van Wyk, the concert places the school in a bad light.

    He, however, justified the decision taken to hire out the school facilities, saying the state of the country's economy was poor.

    “This places us in a bad light, but we have to rent out our facilities to generate an income.”

    Concert organiser Marsha Reede did not respond to queries, claiming she had a sore throat and could not talk. When she was sent a text message, Reede did not respond further.

    Under pressure from the ruling ANC party in South Africa, the George municipality backtracked on leasing its city hall for use by Hofmeyr in April this year, according to media reports.

    On 12 May 2011, Hofmeyr released the lyrics to his new song called 'Ons Sal Dit Oorleef'.

    He had earlier threatened to include the ethnic slur kaffir in the lyrics of the song.

    Hofmeyr, however, removed the offensive word from the original track, citing it would offend his black friends and colleagues.

    He has also previously written on Twitter that black South Africans were the “architects of apartheid”.

    OGONE TLHAGE

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    More VBS links to SME Bank emergeMore VBS links to SME Bank emerge The continually outward rippling of what has been dubbed the biggest bank robbery in designer suits, and the emerging political intrigue that led to the liquidation of the VBS Mutual Bank playing out in a South African court, have again exposed that bank's links to the downfall of Namibia's SME Bank.

    The former CEO of VBS, Andile Ramavhungu, in his responding affidavit in VBS curator Anoosh Roopal's application for his [Ramavhungu's] sequestration, admitted that he had acted as an “agent” for Mamepe Capital since 2013 and that he had “secured” various transactions with Mamepe Capital.

    The SME Bank had invested about N$196 million with Mamepe Capital, a black empowerment financial services company in South Africa headed by Mauwane Kotane.

    Mamepe Capital reportedly transferred the SME Bank's investment to VBS, which then transferred N$150 million into the bank accounts of the obscure companies Asset Management and Financial Service (AMFS), DMA Consultants, Mamepe Capital Asset Managers, Moody Blue and Transparency.com.





    These companies had overlapping account numbers and none of them were registered with the Financial Services Board (FBS), an independent institution established to oversee the South African non-banking financial services industry.

    From the details emerging in the N$1.5 billion heist at the VBS Mutual, the South African media described Mamepe Capital as a 'middleman' in one of VBS's first audacious controversies, referring to the SME Bank's investment, which has now seemingly disappeared.

    Ramavhungu, in a transcript before the court there, has also admitted that he was an old school friend of Kotane.

    It was also reported that while VBS was paying Mamepe Capital, Mamepe in turn paid Ramavhungu almost N$2 million through his consulting firm, Ramavhungu Consulting.

    Ramavhungu then gave Mamepe the VBS business.

    Court documents filed in the Namibian High Court showed that the scam started to unravel here when auditing firm BDO Namibia started to question the soundness of the SME Bank's investment with Mamepe in August 2016.

    The court documents show that during a discussion with BDO Namibia and the Bank of Namibia (BoN) in 2016, questions were raised about the lack of persuasive audit evidence that the N$196 million investment in Mamepe existed, and if it could be recovered.

    In September 2016 the former financial manager of the SME Bank, Joseph Banda, said in correspondence with the BoN that the SME Bank had invested N$185 million with Mamepe and VBS Mutual Bank. He did not immediately say whether this investment had the approval of the board of the SME Bank.

    Banda later verbally informed the BoN that the SME Bank was expecting N$50 million from VBS Mutual Bank by 30 September 2016, but by 11 October that year that money had not yet returned to the SME Bank.

    Still later in October, he informed the BoN that the SME Bank had received N$37 million instead of the N$50 million from VBS.

    BoN then instructed the SME Bank to return the N$196 million invested in Mamepe and VBS by late January 2017. This money was never returned, which led to the BoN taking over the affairs of the SME Bank.

    CATHERINE SASMAN

    0 0
  • 08/13/18--16:00: Child killer bares her soul
  • Child killer bares her soulChild killer bares her soulSeas says she was used for sex, money by Ava's dad Zenobia Seas' father has pleaded with the High Court to have mercy on his daughter, saying emotional abuse had led to her killing his granddaughter. While breaking down repeatedly, as tears streamed down her face in the Windhoek High Court, Zenobia Seas explained how her daughter's father had abused and used her for money and sex, after promising to marry her.

    This formed part of her plea explanation in which she shed light on why she had chosen to murder her three-year-old daughter Ava Antoinette Owoses by suffocating her near Henties Bay.

    She admitted to murder and defeating the course of justice yesterday. Judge Christie Liebenberg accepted her plea and found her guilty as charged.

    Seas, 33, told the court that after murdering her child, she sat in her car and made entries into her diary.

    Afterwards she set the vehicle alight.

    The notes were meant to be left behind in the wake of her suicide.

    However, the fire was extinguished by neighbourhood watch members and she was later arrested at the scene.

    She admitted to suffocating Ava with her blanket.

    Seas said she and the child's father, Immanuel Joslin Owoseb, had been in a relationship since January 2013.

    He allegedly promised to marry her after she gave birth, but had not kept his promise.





    Seas further alleged Owoseb was very abusive, consumed alcohol excessively and dated other women.

    She said he had told her that she was worthless and that he only used her for sex and money.

    Seas said on two occasions Owoseb had assaulted her front of their daughter, who was then one year old.

    She said her parents had not approved of the relationship and her father was particularly upset and disappointed in her for continuing to love someone who abused her.

    Her father, Dirk Seas, who was testifying in mitigation yesterday, says emotional abuse led to his daughter's decision to kill her own child.

    “No normal mother will do such a thing to her child. I want to ask the court to have mercy on my daughter. As a family we have lost our granddaughter and the accused still has another daughter to raise, and we as the grandparents are now in an advanced age,” Dirk pleaded.

    He said his grandchild was a baby when she was first brought to them, adding her death was a great loss for the family.

    “It was painful. But we do not have any grudges against Zenobia. We are not here to judge and only feel very sorry for her,” he said, as tears welled up in his eyes.

    He said it was a good thing his daughter had pleaded guilty to the charges.

    “Anything that happened was for a reason. The family has forgiven her.”

    Dirk recounted that at the time of the murder, his daughter had called and told him her vehicle had developed a mechanical problem on a gravel road.

    “She said she does not know where she is, but that she is just in the car… What disturbed me was why she bought clothing, toys and food for the child.”

    According to him, he searched for his daughter and granddaughter in the afternoon, the whole evening and the next day.

    He found the vehicle on the gravel road between Swakopmund to Henties Bay.

    He said he found the food, toys and clothing the in the car.

    When he arrived, the police were carrying the lifeless body of his granddaughter, while Zenobia was sitting in the car covered with a blanket,

    “As the grandfather of the deceased and father of the accused I plead with court to have mercy on her. What she has done is punishable, but as a father I want to ask the court to exercise mercy on her.”

    Seas had made many entries into her diary on the day of the murder.

    “Dumba! You get what you want, I am out of your life but you will not get Ava, never! Ava and I are no more an issue, never again (sic),” she wrote to the father of the child.

    “It is my early birthday gift to you. F…n' c..nt who wants to take away the life of my child over Ellen who is sleeping around and who bewitched you. Your money was never an issue (sic).”

    She also left a note her boyfriend's new girlfriend: “Ellen your mother's c..nt and stinking c..nt, who destroyed the life of my child by selling your horny c..nt to Dumba. I do not consider you but blame you for my suffering (sic).”

    To her parents she wrote: “Dirk and Bokkie; I had been always the middle child who always came late to you. I had to give up my dreams because of you… when Dirk speaks nobody should speak. I also blame you for everything that went wrong in my life.”

    Liebenberg postponed the matter until Friday for sentencing.



    FRED GOEIEMAN

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    Slight improvement in business confidenceSlight improvement in business confidence The leading indicator of the IJG Business Climate Monitor reversed its trend of the past three months and rose to 40.63 in June – up from 39.58 the previous month.
    The leading indicator is used to forecast the forthcoming pattern of the overall economy. Releasing the latest business climate monitor today, IJG Securities said the leading indicator has remained below the 50-point mark for almost two years now. Values below 50 points imply economic contraction.
    Overall, the IJG Business Climate Monitor in June increased to 53.84 points from 53.16 in May.

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