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Tells it All - Namibian Sun

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    'I was never ready for this experience''I was never ready for this experience' Loide Shaparara is employed as a legal advisor in the Office of the Attorney-General. She volunteers at the Catholic Justice and Peace Commission. Loide is currently pursuing a Master’s in Information Technology and is actively involved in the Namibia Public Services Transformation to electronic governance, as a leader of the Harambee prosperity online services implementation legal committee. Additionally, she equally devotes her time to pioneer social-economic issues particularly that deal in legal matters pertaining to women and children.

    I was graced with the pleasure of spending my six weeks of academic course at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, at the Arizona State University School of Public Service and Community Solutions, in Phoenix (right next to the notorious Mexican order).

    I was never ready for the experience this fellowship had in store, especially the asphyxiating heat, which at 116 F or 47 C was by far the worst I have ever experienced in my life. With regard to culture shock, I was most traumatized by how many people own a firearm and wear it around their hip. Each of the 50 states sets its own laws, and Arizona is an “open-carry” state - any person 21 years of age or older, who is not prohibited possessor, may carry a weapon openly or concealed without the need for a license. Firearms are sold in supermarkets like groceries. On a different note, the integration of the disabled into everyday life similarly intrigued me.

    Due to my professional commitments I was unable to attend the pre-departure orientation, but, invested a lot of time to self-study and online resources, and with the assistance of the dedicated U.S. Embassy staff and very excited Namibian cohort, I managed to keep myself abreast and could prepare successfully.

    Apart from the agony of packing to avoid overweight luggage, our departure and journey was lit. And then it was the dreadful goodbye at the Atlanta Airport, each member of the Namibian Cohort had to navigate to a different terminal to depart to their respective institute(s).

    After 22 hours in transit, I was exhausted and appreciated the warm welcoming I received at the dormitories upon arrival. Then started the mission to acclimatise to the weather and adjustment to the U.S. Epicureanism. It required a lot of discipline and commitment to my exercise programme to balance off the large US food portions.

    I found the academic experience enlightening, particularly because unlike many leadership development courses, the focus was on responsible followership. This angle of leadership postulates that it is vital to develop the leadership abilities of every individual, because every individual is a leader in some sphere of society i.e. family, friendship circle, church community, colleagues etc. The focus should not be on positions, titles and ranks, but on character and commitment, since we have a common responsibility to make the world a better place.

    The fellowship also underscored the fact that collaboration is the new competition – we should always seek to pool our best qualities through collaboration for the good of humanity, rather than to compete.

    In addition to this, I will eternally be grateful for the match of a peer collaborator, Justice Gerald Williams of the Mericopa County Court. I was matched with Justice Williams as a mentor, I received invaluable career guidance, and we are planning to undertake very exciting future projects together.

    My fondest memory will forever remain the electrifying African energy; vibrancy, colours, laughter, and warmth you can only find amidst Africans, particularly at the summit in Washington. The friendship bonds forged and the intellectually stimulating atmosphere lasted the entire six weeks.

    I was never ready for the experience, and it was most rewarding. I would definitely recommend it to young professionals who have a desire to make an impact or to live a life of impact.

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  • 10/05/17--15:00: Journalist and Activist
  • Journalist and Activist Journalist and Activist Alna is a journalist and activist who has become a public figure through her efforts to enhance the stature and rights of women and children in Namibia. Alna is a founding member of Namibia's Coalition against Gender-based Violence. She aspires to make the Coalition a national movement that will have an impact on policy and lawmakers in her country. Alna wants every woman and child in Namibia to be safe, educated and empowered. She hopes to do this by uniting Namibian in the fight for equality for all.

    The Young Africa Leadership Initiative is single-handedly the best experience of my life. I have always felt a burning desire to contribute to the social development of my Namibian people. In a country as small as ours, with remote clusters of population stretched out across vast spaces, it is easy to feel alone. It is easy to feel that your efforts toward improving human rights are isolated. YALI exposed me to hundreds of young African leaders who are working as hard as we are, to improve their communities, countries and Africa as a whole. YALI creates an opportunity for us to hold hands and combine our efforts across the region.

    The academic knowledge I attained over the 8-week fellowship was equally incomparable. I was introduced to Public Administration during the YALI programme at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship. I was exposed to a discourse that altered my entire life’s purpose. The Public Administration track taught us skills in Managing NGOs and Civil Society, Citizen Participation in the work of Government, Gender Issues in Development and Cohort Building. We were exposed to a wide discourse, presented to us by the best minds in the USA.

    Our academic work was complimented by outreach programmes, sight visits, meetings with Governors and Supreme Court judges as well as tourist adventures. We had the opportunity to experience the inner-workings of the USA’s federal government system as well as the complex aspects of their democracy. The leaders we spoke to were humble and open to sharing their obstacles and solutions with us. The university staff and town of Syracuse opened their homes and hearts to our YALI 2017 cohort.

    The entire experience was rounded off by the warm and kind nature of the American people. Spending most of my time in upstate New York, I experienced numerous cultures. The most remarkable of which were the First Nations, the Native American people. Touring Onondaga Lake, they taught us how they were the original custodians of the land and of America’s modern democracy. It was amazing to see how people who were once so marginalised have found their voice in government. We were exposed to all classes, races and ethnic backgrounds. I realised that, much like Namibia, the American people have had to learn to put their prejudices aside in order to work together as an extremely diverse society with an often violent history.

    The only trouble I had in America was with the food! The food, often not very healthy and mostly mass-produced, was difficult to get used to. However, the service made up for it! The USA is a first-world country. At 250, its democracy is the oldest written democracy in the world and therefore a great lesson for developing nations. A thriving economy and experienced civil service has put an end to extreme poverty in the USA. YALI exposed me to a culture I would never have seen otherwise.

    YALI was an experience of a lifetime. Now I am taking the connections I have made and the things I have learned to intensify my efforts as a women’s rights activist and a community leader. YALI has also strengthened my bonds with other Namibian fellows and we have begun to transfer the skills we found in the USA to leaders here in Namibia. YALI is an adhesive. IF you use it, you will grow stronger and the bonds between you and your goals with strengthen through friendships and collective fellowship efforts.

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    A development programme like few otherA development programme like few other Two participants of the Young African Leaders Initiative share their experiences as part of the Mandela Washington Fellowship, and the contribution it has made to their personal and professional development. The Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, begun in 2014, is the flagship program of the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI) that empowers young people through academic coursework, leadership training, and networking. In 2018, the Fellowship will provide 700 outstanding young leaders from Sub-Saharan Africa with the opportunity to hone their skills at a U.S. college or university with support for professional development after they return home.

    Applications for the 2018 Mandela Washington Fellowship are now open. To sign up simply log on to https://yali.state.gov/washington-fellowship/apply/ or visit the American Cultural Centre, Sanlam Building 3rd Floor for further information. Application closes October 11, 2017.

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    How informal mentorship can change your lifeHow informal mentorship can change your life If your company doesn't have a formal mentorship program, there's no reason you can't create your own. Your goal should be to find someone who understands the benefit of giving or receiving professional support and is excited to engage in it. Mentorship is a hugely important tool for professional growth. It benefits both the mentor and mentee in terms of learning, engagement and confidence. As a result, organisations benefit too. Research shows that employees in mentoring relationships are not only more positive and productive, they're also more likely to stay at the organization and advance within it.

    Sadly, mentorship is not always a valued part of every organisational culture. A study conducted by Robert Walters recruiting consultancy showed that 83 percent of professionals would like to be involved in a mentoring program, yet only 29 percent are in workplaces that offer them.

    That doesn't mean you can't still benefit from creating your own mentorship program. If no formal structure exists, you can always create your own informal mentorship. Here are some steps to take:

    Identify the right match

    Whichever side of the equation you're on, determine who you'd like to partner with. If you're looking for a mentor, find that person who has what you want – the career, the character, the knowledge, the experience, the reputation, etc. You also want to find someone who is approachable and appears willing to share his or her expertise with you.

    As a potential mentor, you can also identify good candidates for mentorship. Look for someone who can really benefit from your guidance – and wants it. A good mentee is someone who is ambitious and eager to learn, but also someone who won't require too much hand-holding.

    Remember that a mentorship only works if both parties are invested in it, so be discerning in your selection.

    Propose your idea

    Once you think you've found a good partner, share your idea. Depending on your goals and your own personal style, you may or may not choose to define this as a "mentorship". It's perfectly acceptable to use other language that feels more natural.

    For example, as a mentee approaching a potential mentor, you can say something like this: "I really admire your career and who you are as a professional. Would you be willing to share some of your experiences with me? I'd love to learn all I can from you."

    As a mentor approaching a potential mentee, you can say something like this: "I see so much potential in you and would love to support you in your career. I think I could be of use to you; would you like to get together and chat?"

    Again, find words that feel comfortable for you, and recognize that some people will not necessarily take you up on your suggestion. Don't push! Your goal should be to find someone who understands the benefit of giving or receiving professional support and is excited to engage in it.

    Establish your "structure"

    During your initial discussion, ask the other person if he or she would like to continue working together and, if so, how they might envision that. Be sure to bring your own ideas to the table too.

    Informal mentorships don't necessarily have to have any set structure or schedule, though it can be helpful. Perhaps a weekly or monthly meeting would be useful if both parties are willing and able to devote the time.

    Alternatively, as a mentor, you might simply explain that your door is open for the mentee as needed. You're there to help him or her brainstorm solutions to problems or provide insights for learning new skills. As a mentee, you might ask if it's OK to call on this person when facing challenges and to seek advice on career-related issues.

    There are no right or wrong ways to approach this. The most important thing is to use your time wisely. Both parties must be fully engaged with the other person and come prepared to make your discussions fruitful.

    Regardless of the structure you establish, be an active participant. Reach out to the other person on a regular basis just to check in, even if there is no pressing need. But again, make the conversation productive by considering what you would like to discuss first.

    Mentorships can be incredibly rewarding experiences for everyone involved. They can enhance your professional life and, in some cases, can result in lifelong friendships. Don't let the lack of a formal mentorship program prevent you from experiencing this for yourself. – source: https://money.usnews.com

    How informal mentorship can change your life

    If your company doesn't have a formal mentorship program, there's no reason you can't create your own.

    Mentorship is a hugely important tool for professional growth. It benefits both the mentor and mentee in terms of learning, engagement and confidence. As a result, organisations benefit too. Research shows that employees in mentoring relationships are not only more positive and productive, they're also more likely to stay at the organization and advance within it.

    Sadly, mentorship is not always a valued part of every organisational culture. A study conducted by Robert Walters recruiting consultancy showed that 83 percent of professionals would like to be involved in a mentoring program, yet only 29 percent are in workplaces that offer them.

    That doesn't mean you can't still benefit from creating your own mentorship program. If no formal structure exists, you can always create your own informal mentorship. Here are some steps to take:

    Identify the right match

    Whichever side of the equation you're on, determine who you'd like to partner with. If you're looking for a mentor, find that person who has what you want – the career, the character, the knowledge, the experience, the reputation, etc. You also want to find someone who is approachable and appears willing to share his or her expertise with you.

    As a potential mentor, you can also identify good candidates for mentorship. Look for someone who can really benefit from your guidance – and wants it. A good mentee is someone who is ambitious and eager to learn, but also someone who won't require too much hand-holding.

    Remember that a mentorship only works if both parties are invested in it, so be discerning in your selection.

    Propose your idea

    Once you think you've found a good partner, share your idea. Depending on your goals and your own personal style, you may or may not choose to define this as a "mentorship". It's perfectly acceptable to use other language that feels more natural.

    For example, as a mentee approaching a potential mentor, you can say something like this: "I really admire your career and who you are as a professional. Would you be willing to share some of your experiences with me? I'd love to learn all I can from you."

    As a mentor approaching a potential mentee, you can say something like this: "I see so much potential in you and would love to support you in your career. I think I could be of use to you; would you like to get together and chat?"

    Again, find words that feel comfortable for you, and recognize that some people will not necessarily take you up on your suggestion. Don't push! Your goal should be to find someone who understands the benefit of giving or receiving professional support and is excited to engage in it.

    Establish your "structure"

    During your initial discussion, ask the other person if he or she would like to continue working together and, if so, how they might envision that. Be sure to bring your own ideas to the table too.

    Informal mentorships don't necessarily have to have any set structure or schedule, though it can be helpful. Perhaps a weekly or monthly meeting would be useful if both parties are willing and able to devote the time.

    Alternatively, as a mentor, you might simply explain that your door is open for the mentee as needed. You're there to help him or her brainstorm solutions to problems or provide insights for learning new skills. As a mentee, you might ask if it's OK to call on this person when facing challenges and to seek advice on career-related issues.

    There are no right or wrong ways to approach this. The most important thing is to use your time wisely. Both parties must be fully engaged with the other person and come prepared to make your discussions fruitful.

    Regardless of the structure you establish, be an active participant. Reach out to the other person on a regular basis just to check in, even if there is no pressing need. But again, make the conversation productive by considering what you would like to discuss first.

    Mentorships can be incredibly rewarding experiences for everyone involved. They can enhance your professional life and, in some cases, can result in lifelong friendships. Don't let the lack of a formal mentorship program prevent you from experiencing this for yourself. – source: https://money.usnews.com

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    Conquering the world, one piece of legislation at a timeConquering the world, one piece of legislation at a time Anél van der Vyver, legal officer at the Office of the Attorney-General and a mover and shaker in the Namibian legal field, talks about the importance of professional mentorship, having 8 hours a day to thrive and her career highlights.

    1. Tell us about yourself- where and what did you study?

    In applying for my tertiary education I took a risk and applied only to Stellenbosch University for B.Com LLB. I knew I wanted to attend Stellies, but I only knew I wanted to study law on the first day when the lecturer seriously surveyed the class of 300 students and said: “Law is not justice”.

    2. Why did you decided to pursue a career in Law?

    My lecturer’s statement cleared up many emotional and ethical issues I had with the typical “Suits” style of law. I knew then that I needed to study law, to try and facilitate access to justice. In my second year at Stellies I was convinced that I wanted to pursue a career in law, but for government.

    3. What does your current position/ job entail and how long have you been in this position?

    The Office of the Attorney-General, where I work as a legal officer, is mandated by Article 87 of the Namibian Constitution to be the principal legal advisor to His Excellency the President and the Government. My work entails drafting legal opinions for the Ministries, Offices and Agencies that make up Government. I have been a legal officer at the Office since April 2015.

    4. Please share some of the highlights of your career with us

    Due to the varying nature of legal opinions that the Office is required to draft, I have been exposed to several fields in a very short time. I am able to live out my passions in a single career by being involved in environmental matters; food safety (I love cooking and baking); and finance. A big career highlight has been the opportunity to travel for training. I have travelled to Singapore and New York to attend training conferences.

    5. Do you have professional mentors that have assisted you in your career development?

    The Honourable Attorney-General, Mr. Sacky Shanghala, MP is a tough, but fair task master. He has taught me when to be harsh and when to have compassion. His leadership and accountability style create an environment in which I can give my utmost, take calculated risks and act in the best interest of the Government.

    I also have great admiration and appreciation for my swimming coach, Mr Winnie Leitner. He has taught me balance- 24 hours in a day means one has 8 hours to work, 8 hours to sleep and 8 hours to thrive.

    The importance of finding a professional mentor cannot be overemphasised. In order to be as effective and efficient as possible one must build on the success and failures of a more experienced leader in your field. If you have the privilege of being a mentee it becomes your responsibility to become a mentor too.

    6. What advice do you have for young professional women who want to leave their mark in a competitive professional environment?

    The German poet, Hermann Hesse said “Of all ridiculous things the most ridiculous seems to me, to be busy — to be a man who is brisk about his food and his work,”

    It’s a sobering sentiment against the backdrop of modern life, where the cult of busyness and productivity plays out as the chief drama of our existence. My advice is therefore not to be busy, but be joyful- the conception of life as a happy thing, as a festival.

    The importance of finding a professional mentor cannot be overemphasised. In order to be as effective and efficient as possible one must build on the success and failures of a more experienced leader in your field.

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  • 10/05/17--15:00: Important soft skills
  • Important soft skillsImportant soft skills When applying for a job, many people tend to emphasize their hard skills – the specific knowledge and abilities required for a particular job. These are typically skills that can be clearly defined and measured. It’s also necessary to highlight the most important soft skills you possess, to show why you’re the best candidate for the job.

    Soft skills are much more difficult to define and measure – they are the interpersonal or “people” skills that help you to successfully interact with others in the workplace. Regardless of the job, you have to interact effectively with supervisors and people above and below you on the work chart, as well as others possibly- such as customers, vendors, patients, students, etc.

    Top 7 Soft Skills Employers Want

    1. Acting as a team player – this means not only being cooperative, but also displaying strong leadership skills when necessary.

    2. Flexibility – this is an extremely valuable asset to employees. Those who can adapt to any situation are dependable no matter what's thrown at them.

    3. Effective communication – this is paramount to almost any job.

    Communication involves articulating oneself well, being a good listener and using appropriate body language.

    4. Problem-solving and resourcefulness – no matter what your profession, these skills are critical when unexpected issues inevitably arise.

    5. Accepting feedback – not only accepting feedback gracefully, but also applying that feedback, fosters professional growth.

    6. Confidence is key – that being said, it's also important to always have the knowledge and skills to support self-assurance. By being confident and capable, your supervisors, employees, and clients will believe in what you are saying.

    7. Creative thinking – being able to come up with unique solutions or alternatives is invaluable; it drives innovation and increases efficiency.

    Employment Skills Differ by Job

    When you are seeking a leadership position, either as a manager, or a member of a team, you will want to highlight different assets than if you are seeking a technical position, for example. The soft skills you need to be an effective leader will include things like being able to delegate, and offer constructive criticism.

    Information Technology positions require soft skills such as creativity and the ability to present ideas and solutions to individuals as well as groups. Strong communications skills, both written and oral are an important asset in virtually any field, at every level.

    How to Let Employers Know the Skills You Have

    When you're writing resumes and cover letters, it's essential to reference the skills the employer is seeking in your job application materials. The same is true when you're interviewing. Also be sure to present your soft skills to the hiring manager during interviews. Show off your positive attitude and enthusiasm throughout the interview.

    Don't just say that you have the skills the company needs – prove it to them. Prepare thoroughly for your interview, and have a few examples of instances when you used your soft skills effectively.

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  • 10/06/17--02:27: Katima chaos escalates
  • Katima chaos escalatesKatima chaos escalates The Swapo party has condemned the demolition of houses by the Katima Mulilo Town Council (KMTC), which was accompanied by violence, but added that government, and not the party, must address the issue, said secretary-general Nangolo Mbumba.
    “Local authorities must be careful on how they manage their towns. The party works too hard to get people to vote for us… we cannot afford to antagonise them.”
    Social media was abuzz last night and reported 6 400 people were left homeless, a boy died while sleeping in a house that was demolished, and two others were shot and wounded.
    Pictures of people hurt, with blood streaming down their faces made the rounds on Facebook, yet the police’s crime investigations coordinator for Zambezi, Deputy Commissioner Evans Simasiku said no-one was hurt or killed.
    KMTC mayor Georgino Mwiya-Simataa confirmed demolitions are continuing “lawfully”. “People are not chased away. We just need them to go so that we can service the land.”
    She said only structures and homes built in 2017 are taken down. She explained that the land in question is earmarked for a public private partnership for low-cost housing.
    The Ombudsman, Advocate John Walters confirmed that a team was dispatched this morning to investigate rights violations in the town.
    Human rights law firm Norman Tjombe and Elago condemned the KMTC saying it has “descended into a vigilante organisation” much like the apartheid regime. Tjombe confirmed that that they are approaching the High Court for an interdict.
    JEMIMA BEUKES

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  • 10/06/17--03:59: Air Namibia accused appears
  • Air Namibia accused appearsAir Namibia accused appears Penna Munyunda, no age given, appeared today on charges of fraud and attempted theft in the Windhoek Magistrate’s Court. Munyunda is accused of attempting to rob Air Namibia of N$1.1 million by allegedly trying to revert a payment to Standard Bank. The bank alerted the airline that an illegal diversion of monies, destined for the Namibia Airports Company, had been received. The matter is being heard by Magistrate Vanessa Stanley and Rowan van Wyk appears for the State. Christiaan Nambahu appeared for Munyunda. The case was postponed to 11 October for a formal bail application.

    FRED GOEIEMAN

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    Swapo politburo defers nominationsSwapo politburo defers nominations

    The Swapo politburo meeting this morning deferred the nomination process of candidates for its top four positions for the November congress to next week Thursday. Namibian Sun understands the meeting will exclusively be called for nominations for the president, vice-president, secretary-general and deputy secretary-general positions. Swapo secretary-general Nangolo Mbumba confirmed to Namibian Sun that acting president Hage Geingob announced his preferred candidates for the vice-president (Netumbo Nandi-Ndaitwah), secretary-general (Sophia Shaningwa) and deputy secretary-general (Marco Hausiku) during the meeting. More candidates are expected to emerge ahead of Thursday's meeting.

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    60  hippos found dead in Zambezi60 hippos found dead in Zambezi More than 60 hippos have been discovered dead in Bwabwata National Park in the Zamezi Region. The first 10 were already dicovered on 30 September, while the remaining animals were found this week. The environment ministry suspects that the hippos died of natural causes, probably anthrax. Poaching has been ruled out.

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    Shaningwa joins politburo, ministers lose nomination slotsShaningwa joins politburo, ministers lose nomination slots

    Urban and rural development minister and one of the aspiring candidates for the Swapo secretary-general position, Sophia Shaningwa, was today sworn in as a member of the politburo in the place of former President Hifikepunye Pohamba.
    "According to the Swapo Party Constitution the politburo consists of 24 members. Due to a vacancy that exists on the politburo, the next in line on the party list of elected members to the politburo will become a member. In this respect, Comrade Sophia Shaningwa, being the next in line, becomes the member of the politburo. She was thus sworn in today during the meeting of the politburo," read the Swapo statement.
    The party also announced that some of the cabinet ministers, who were unconstitutionally elected to represent the regions to which they are assigned to as national leaders, will not take part in this year's congress.
    "The politburo resolved to apply these constitutional provisions strictly. Consequently, those members who were elected by the District Conferences and Regional Conferences but who do not belong to either the District Executive Committee or Regional Executive Committee are disqualified as delegates to the 6th Congress. This provision does not apply to members who are members of either the District Executive Committee or Regional Executive Committee in an ex-officio capacity. The Politburo also disqualified all the members of the District Executive Committee of Otjombinde, including the District Coordinator.
    Regions and Districts are directed to replace those members who have been disqualifies according to the prescribed manner of electing delegates to the Congress."

    STAFF REPORTER

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    Welwitschias denied at the whistleWelwitschias denied at the whistleSo close and yet so very, very far It was a familiar feeling for the Namibian national rugby team, the Windhoek Draught Welwitschias when they narrowly lost against the Boland Cavaliers over the weekend in Swakopmund. A last-minute Boland Cavaliers try denied the Windhoek Draught Welwitschias a memorable victory when the teams clashed in the Currie Cup First Division encounter at the Swakopmund sports field on Saturday.

    The historic match was the Welwitschias' first to be played at the coast. It was a game of two halves as the hosts eventually ran out of steam conceding moments before the whistle blew for the end of the game.

    In the first half, the Welwitschias were in superb form with tries from Johan Tromp, Mahco Prinsloo and Lesley Klim. Boland only managed one try in the first half through Alcino Izaacs. The home side led 19-7 at half time.

    The second half was a different affair as the visitors dominated territorial play. The Cavaliers' fullback Gerrity van Wyk, ran through the Welwitschias' defensive line to score the visitors' second try early in the second half. Having converted the try, Boland reduced Namibia's lead to 19-14.

    However, against the run of play the Welwitschias gave the home crowd something to cheer about as left flanker David Philander scored the Welwitschias' fourth try. Teuns Kotze's missed conversion meant it was 24-14 on the scoreboard.

    With Boland Cavaliers needing a win to qualify for the Currie Cup First Division play-offs, they upped the impetus. Sergio Torrens scored the visitors' third try which Elgar Watts converted.

    It was 24-21 to the hosts with the home crowd nervously anticipating the referee to blow the final whistle.

    Boland Cavaliers tested a tired looking Welwitschias defensive line with only moments remaining and eventually got through when Elgar Watts crossed the chalk to break local hearts.

    The fly half's missed conversion was immaterial as the scoreboard read 26-24 in favour of the visitors at full time. The Boland Cavaliers move on to the First Division play-offs because of their top-four finish.

    As for the Welwitschias, the familiar feeling of déjà vu sunk in once again. It was the fourth time that the Welwitschias lost a Currie Cup First Division match with a close margin. They also suffered close defeats against the Valke (56-47), SWD Eagles (36-32) and Border Bulldogs (26-25).

    The Windhoek Draught Welwitschias remained seventh on the log standings with 14 points, one place ahead of rock bottom Eastern Province.





    Adolf Kaure

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  • 10/08/17--15:00: Henle continues to shine
  • Henle continues to shineHenle continues to shine Namibian rider Marcel Henle took part in the South African National Enduro Championship over two days in late September.

    Professional riders clocked in over 300km of dust, grit and epic Mountain View.

    In Round 6, Henle managed to win the trophy, coming first in the High School Class.

    Saturday's route differed slightly with the exciting addition of a dry riverbed and sheltered forest section.

    On round seven the battle was on between Matthew Green, the High School leading champ of South Africa and Marcel Henle.

    After giving everything Marcel pulled into the pits 20 seconds behind Matthew, getting second place.

    Marcel is now looking foward to an epic battle at the 50th edition of the “Mother of Hard Enduro”, the Roof of Africa, which will take place from 16 to 19 November 2017 in Maseru, Lesotho.



    Sport Reporter

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    Football regions get new leadersFootball regions get new leadersNunuheb re-elected Several regions now have new leaders to run football affairs in those areas. Five regions of the Namibia Football Association (NFA) last week elected new leaders to lead football regional leagues.

    The elections took place at the NFA congress last week.

    Ludwig Nunuheb of the Omaheke Football region was re-elected as chairman of that region.

    Morris Mbasungu was elected as chairman of the Zambezi Region, while Sammy Mushelenga will now be the head of Ohangwena Region.

    Albine Kauko Iita has taken over the Oshikoto regional chairmanship position and Beatus Nandago took over the Oshana Region.

    Namibia Football Association president, Frans Mbidi expressed excitement about the new leaders in those regions.

    “We are very happy to announce the names of these people and we do know that they will be doing a great job to improve their football regions.

    “It is now up to them to take the football of their respective regions to another level.

    “There is still more to be done in these specific regions and we trust that they will indeed do good things for their regions,” Mbidi said.

    Mbidi recognised the work of the former chairmen, stating that they have done what they could while at the helm of those regions.

    “It is also up to people in those regions to help the new people fulfil the mandate of the Namibia Football Association.

    “Let us all shy away from trying to break down one another, but stand together to improve the game we all love so dearly.”

    The president further revealed that all financial statements of the NFA were also approved at the congress.

    “The congress was really peaceful because of the fact that nobody was forcefully dismissed from their positions.

    “It shows that Namibia football is working towards building what is broken,” the president reiterated.

    Jesse Jackson Kauraisa

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  • 10/08/17--15:00: Zambia prepares for armyworm
  • Zambia prepares for armywormZambia prepares for armyworm Zambian authorities expect a new armyworm outbreak in the coming crop season after the maize-eating pests ravaged southern Africa early this year, says a report.

    The southern African country said that it expected the outbreak across the country from October to March, reported Reuters.

    In a statement this week, Communications and Transport Minister Brian Mushimba, who is in charge of the department of meteorology, said that the department was working in partnership with the agricultural ministry to ensure that the pests were fought.

    He added: “Zambia would experience normal to above normal rainfall in the 2017/18 crop season with flash floods in some areas.”

    The land-locked African country was among a number of regional countries that were hit by the armyworm outbreak during the 2016/17 season.

    The armyworms nearly wiped out crop production in the region, but Zambia managed to reap 3.6 million tons of maize, up from 2.8 million the previous year, after it deployed its national air force to transport pesticides across the country so that fields could be sprayed.

    The outbreak followed a crippling El Nino-triggered drought which scorched much of the region last year, hitting crop production and leaving millions in need of food aid.

    The countries with confirmed cases of the armyworm outbreak faced import bans on agricultural products because the armyworm is classified as a quarantine pest.

    The pest can also cause extensive damage to crops and has a preference for maize, the regional staple.



    NEWS24

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    Islamists attack Mozambican policeIslamists attack Mozambican police Suspected Islamists attacked a string of police stations in a small town in northern Mozambique killing two policemen but 14 of the gunmen were slain, police said on Saturday.

    Police have been slow in releasing details of the attacks which occurred on Thursday and Friday in Mocimboa de Praia.

    “We recorded 14 deaths and several bandits were wounded,” police spokesperson Inacio Dina told AFP.

    Police said the attacks were coordinated.

    Local media said three police stations in the sleepy town, 80km from natural gas fields, were targeted.

    At a news conference on Thursday, Dina suggested the attackers were linked to a homegrown “radical Islamic sect” but gave no details.

    Police have so far arrested 10 other gunmen, recovered four firearms and more than 100 rounds of ammunition.

    “The motive of the attacks is still unknown but in the past police arrested some religious leaders of Islamic extremist sects,” Dina said.

    “The way they operated makes us believe that there is a structure behind the group,” Dina told AFP, but ruled out any links “between the attackers and external forces”.

    “There is no evidence that they are members of Shabaab or Boko Haram. According to the information gathered, all those captured or killed are Mozambicans,” said the police spokesperson speaking from the capital Maputo.

    A local journalist suggested on social media that the attackers belonged to the virtually unknown group, Swalissuna, which has been in existence for about five years.

    “They have specific grievances with the police and aimed the attack at them,” tweeted journalist and private media owner Erik Charas.

    The attacks lasted two days, until the police dispatched special forces from Pemba, 500km away.

    Armed clashes and assassinations of politicians are not uncommon in Mozambique.

    On-and-off clashes have occurred in recent years between government troops and armed militias loyal to opposition party and former rebel movement Renamo.

    But a truce unilaterally declared by Renamo in December has been observed with only minor breaches.



    NAMPA/AFP

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  • 10/08/17--15:00: Khartoum still blacklisted
  • Khartoum still blacklistedKhartoum still blacklistedUS authorities say time is not right Although the US has lifted its 20-year-old trade embargo with Sudan, authorities in that country say the time is not yet right for removing it from its terrorism blacklist. The top US envoy in Sudan said on Saturday that conditions have to be “right” for holding talks with Khartoum on removing it from Washington's blacklist of state sponsors of “terrorism”.

    US charge d'affaires to Khartoum Steven Koutsis' remarks came a day after Washington ended its 20-year-old trade embargo on the east African country.

    However, the US did not drop Sudan from the blacklist, a consistent demand by Khartoum in return for co-operating with US intelligence agencies in fighting “terrorism”.

    “This is something that both sides are keenly willing to discuss, but we have to be certain that conditions are right for discussions to remove [Sudan] from the list,” Koutsis said at a press conference at the US mission in Khartoum.

    “The government of Sudan knows fully well what it has to do to remove from the list and we hope that those conditions will come soon,” he said, without elaborating on what the conditions were.

    On Friday, Khartoum hailed Washington's decision to end the sanctions as a “positive decision”, but expressed disappointment at not being removed from the blacklist.



    Conditions

    “Discussion on removing from the state sponsors of terror was not part of our engagement under the five-track plan,” Koutsis said, referring to the five conditions that Washington had insisted that Khartoum meet in return for ending the trade embargo.

    “If you are talking about a dialogue on this issue it has not happened yet.”

    Khartoum insists that there is “no reason” for it to be on the blacklist as it has cooperated with US intelligence agencies in fighting “terrorism” in the region, a claim acknowledged even by the US State Department.

    Sudanese officials say that having Khartoum on this list along with Syria and Iran makes it difficult to seek foreign debt relief, which has been a factor in hampering the country's economic growth.

    Washington first imposed the sanctions in 1997 over Khartoum's alleged support for Islamist militant groups. Osama bin Laden, the slain al-Qaeda founder, lived in Sudan between 1992 and 1996.

    Following a significant improvement in relations, former US president Barack Obama eased the sanctions in January before leaving office with a view to lifting them completely after a six-month review.

    But in July, President Donald Trump extended the review period to 12 October. On Friday, his administration decided to lift the embargo permanently.



    NAMPA/AP

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  • 10/08/17--15:00: Liberia votes tomorrow
  • Liberia votes tomorrowLiberia votes tomorrow Liberia, which elects a new president tomorrow, is an English-speaking nation in West Africa that is still scarred by a gruesome civil war and a devastating Ebola outbreak.

    Here is a snapshot of the country:

    In 1822 the United States starts sending freed black slaves to a part of West Africa that eventually becomes Liberia. The new arrivals declare independence in 1847, establishing the first republic in Africa.

    Descendants of former slaves run the country until the assassination in 1980 of President William Tolbert in a coup led by Samuel Doe, who establishes an authoritarian and corrupt regime.

    Doe is captured in 1990, at the height of civil war, and tortured to death by men loyal to warlord Prince Johnson, one of the candidates in Tuesday's election.

    The National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL) of Charles Taylor launches a rebellion in December 1989 in the northeast that quickly takes control of most of the country but not the capital, Monrovia.

    The civil waar involves seven rival factions until it ends under a peace accord in 1997.

    In the elections that follow, Taylor is elected president.

    Violence again erupts in 1999 when another rebellion flares and Taylor loses control of much of the country, fleeing in 2003 to Nigeria.

    The death toll from 14 years of civil war is estimated at 250 000 with hundreds of thousands of people displaced. Some of the worst abuses are perpetuated by government forces.

    In 2012, Taylor is convicted by an international criminal court of 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

    President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf becomes Africa's first female head of state in 2005 when she wins presidential elections.

    “Ma Ellen” wins relection in 2011, and a month later is co-awarded the Nobel Peace Prize as a champion of women's rights.

    The 78-year-old has served two terms and so is barred from standing in the coming election.

    Liberia suffered the most deaths in West Africa's 2014-16 outbreak of Ebola.

    The virus killed 11 300 people in three countries, more than 4 800 of them in Liberia.

    The years of civil war devastated the economy and infrastructure of Liberia, which is rich in natural resources such as minerals and forests.

    Growth stagnated at zero percent over 2014 and 2016 because of the Ebola outbreak and a fall in commodity prices, the World Bank says.

    But prospects are better for 2017 with gold production and improvements in service likely to account for better economic performance, it says.

    Most of the population of 4.7 million people live without basic services such as water and electricity.

    NAMPA/AFP

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  • 10/08/17--15:00: Aanuulema ya patelwa pondje
  • Aanuulema ya patelwa pondjeAanuulema ya patelwa pondje NAMPA

    Aantu mboka taya lumbu nomaulema momidhingoloko dhomuushayi, ihaya talika ngele taku tulwa miilonga omayakulo gopauyogoki momidhingoloko dhoka, pahapu dhomunashipundi gwoNational Federation of People with Disabilities in Namibia, Daniel Siremo.

    Siremo okwa popi ngaaka pethimbo lyoshigongiilonga shuuministeli wokukondjitha oluhepo, tashi ithanwa ‘poverty ministry’s popularisation workshop of the Blueprint on Wealth Redistribution and Poverty Eradication'.

    Elalakano lyoshigongiilonga shoka sha ningwa moshilongo ashihe okutseyithila aakuthimbinga ayehe kombinga yoompangela dhetulo miilonga oblueprint oshowo okuhwahwameka ekuthombinga lyaakuthimbinga metulo miilonga lyoompangela ndhoka. Omunambelewa ngoka okwa pooi kutya epangelo lyaNamibia otali longo nuudhiginini moku andjakaneka omayakulo gopauyogoki moshilongo, ihe nonando ongaaka omayakulo ngoka inaga kwatelwa mo aantu mboka taya lumbu nomaulema.

    Siremo okwa pula kutya etumwalaka lini tali tumwa moshigwana uuna taku tungwa uundjugo oshowo omayakulo gamwe ngoka inaga kwatelamo aantu mboka taya lumbu nomaulema, ta popi kutya aantu mboka oye wete ya patelwa pondje. Kombinga yopoloyeka yetungo lyomagumbo gwehwata, Siremo okwa pula opo epangelo li longulule omagumbo gaanuulema nokuga ninga taga vulu okulongithwa kaantu mboka taya lumbu nomaulema.

    Sho a yamukula komakemo gaSiremo, Amushanga guuministeli wokukondjitha oluhepo, I-Ben Nashandi okwa popi kutya onkalo yaantu mboka taya lumbu nomaulema oya pumbwa okutalika miikondo ayihe yepangelo.

    Nashandi okwa popi kutya shoka osha pumbwa okutalika opo kehe ethimbo epangelo tali tungu omandiki nena aantu mboka taya lumbu nomaulema otaya talika.

    Okwa popi kutya uuministeli weyambulepo lyioondoolopa niitopolwa yomuushayi, itawu tula miilonga oompangela oompe ndhoka tadhi kala nokulongithwa mokutunga omagumbo gopoloyeka ndhoka yomagumbo gehwata, konima sho sha dhimbululwa kutya omagumbo ngoka ga tungwa nale inaga kwatelamo aantu mboka taya lumbu nomaulema.



    Nashandi okwa popi kutya oshiyetwapo shaSiremo, otashi pewa uuministeli.

    Oshigongiilonga shoka osha kaliwa kOminista yoshikondo shokukondjitha oluhepo, Bishop Zephania Kameeta oshowo ngoloneya gwoshitopolwa shaKavango East Region, Dr Samuel Mbambo.

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    Oompumbwe dhaalongiskola odhishiwike aniwaOompumbwe dhaalongiskola odhishiwike aniwa ILENI NANDJATO

    Ehangano lyoNamibia National Teacher’s Union (Nantu) olya holola okuuva nayi kwalyo tali pula woo ekutho miilonga lyoveta ndjoka tayi utha oPPP, ihe Minista Katrina Hanse Himarwa okwa popi kutya oPPP, oyo owala omukalo tagu vulu okukandula po oompumbwe dhaalongiskola.

    Omupeha omupresidende gwoNantu, Joseph Dinyando ngoka a popi pehala lyomupresidende gwehangano ndyoka, Simeon Kavila pokapale kaShakati, sho kwa dhimbulukiwa Esiku lyAalongiskola mOshilongo okwa popi kutya, Nantu oku na omaiyuvo gonayi omolwa ompango yoPPP, ndjoka tayi yi moshipala egandjo lyelongo kaanona AaNamibia oshowo egandjo lyuundjolowele, onkene Nantu ota pula ekutho miilonga lyompango ndoka. Nonando ongaaka Ominista yelongo oya tindi omapopyo ngoka, kutya omaupyakadhi ngoka ga taalela aalongiskola okwe ga mona sho a talelepo ooskola dha yooloka oshilongo, ihe uuministeli we owa tala kutya oPPP oyo owala tayi ka kandula po omikundu ndhoka.

    “Pethimbo nda talele po ooskola moshilongo onda mono onkalo nomaupyakadhi ngoka ga taalela aalongiskola. Onda mono kutya aalongi oyendji oye wete kutya inaya yalulwa na inaya pumbiwa. Oyemdji oye wete kutya kape naa ngoka teya pulakene komakemo gawo. Onda mona onkalo yomaupyakadhi gopaliko moka mu na aalongi mboka , ngaashi onkalo yomagumbo moka haya zi. Ohaya zi woo moombashu nokutalela onkalo ya nayipala yesiku ya pupyala nenge ya talala, noyendji natango ohaya taaguluka iishana yuudha omeya pethimbo lyomvula , opo ya kwashilipaleke kutya oya gandja elongo kuunona waNamibia. Oto thigi po ofamili yoye okuya muushayi omolwa oshigwana,” Himarwa a popi.

    Minista okwa popi kutya okwa dhidhilika kutya aalongi yomuushayi oye na uupyakadhi wa faathana naalongi yomoondoolopa.

    Okwa popi kutya aalongi moondoolopa otaya thiminikwa ya ze momahala omashona omolwa oondando dhoohiila dhoka dhili pombanda unene.

    Okwa tsikile kutya uuministeli otawu longo nopublic private partnerships opo ku vule okutungilwa aalongi omagumbo nokulongulula omahala omakulu mooskola odhindji.

    Ndinyando okwa popi kutya onkalo ndjoka tayi ihumbatelwa aalongiskola oya pumbwa okuhulithwa po meendelelo, naalongi naya tameke okwiihumbatelwa ngaashi aanashilonga yakwawo.

    ILENI NANDJATO

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