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Tells it All - Namibian Sun
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    Palladium outshines gold for first time in 16 yearsPalladium outshines gold for first time in 16 yearsRecord high of US$1 263.56/oz A sustained supply deficit coupled with robust demand and rising interest from speculators have pushed prices of palladium up. Palladium seems to have been successfully marketed as the 'go-to' input in hybrids before the EV market share hits an inflection point. - Scotiabank Arpan Varghese and Swati Verma - Palladium is more valuable than gold for the first time since 2002, with prices soaring by around 50% in less than four months to record levels - just as gold failed to capitalise on some seemingly bullish scenarios.

    A sustained supply deficit coupled with robust demand and rising interest from speculators have pushed prices of palladium - used mainly in emissions-reducing catalysts for vehicles - from around US$832 an ounce in mid-August to a high of US$1 263.56 per ounce on Wednesday.

    Palladium was trading at a premium of more than US$25 an ounce to gold on Wednesday, in striking contrast to about two years ago when bullion was twice as expensive.

    Gold is meanwhile stuck in the doldrums around US$1 235, having largely lost out to the dollar this year as a US-China trade row escalated against a backdrop of rising interest rates.

    Expectations that investors might turn to gold as a safe haven asset at a time of rising economic uncertainty and protectionism have been dented.

    "It [parity with gold] is fundamentally justified. The market has been in sustained deficit and the effects of that are being borne out," said Marcus Garvey, analyst at ICBC Standard bank.

    Platinum

    Palladium's gains this year have overshadowed platinum as well, having overtaken its better-known sister metal last year.

    Both are primarily consumed by automakers for catalytic converter manufacturing, but platinum is more heavily used in the diesel vehicles that have fallen out of favour since the Volkswagen emissions-rigging scandal broke in 2015.

    "Palladium is characterised by the strongest supply-demand backdrop across the major precious metals," precious metals consultancy Metals Focus said in a note.

    Supplies from major producers including Russia and South Africa are also not growing, analysts said.

    Metals Focus said it expected global automotive palladium demand to achieve a new record high in 2018 of around 8.5 million ounces.

    Palladium, unlike platinum, has benefited from a switch to petrol engines and expectations for growth in hybrid electric vehicles, which tend to be gasoline-powered.

    This has helped the metal largely ignore falling car sales across the globe, especially in China, the world's largest auto market, where sales marked a fourth straight month of declines.

    Longer term, though, widespread adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) could lead to reduced demand for both platinum and palladium in autocatalysts.

    "Palladium seems to have been successfully marketed as the 'go-to' input in hybrids before the EV market share hits an inflection point," analysts at Scotiabank wrote in a note.

    Speculative interest

    Commerzbank said the rise in palladium prices was accompanied by high speculative interest, reflected in the strong build-up of net long positions.

    "In the short term, more speculators could jump on the bandwagon and drive the price even higher, especially as the palladium market is very small and illiquid," it said.

    However, palladium's strong run could run out of steam, as technical analysis charts show prices now moving into overbought territory, which could enable gold to re-establish its premium over palladium, analysts said.

    "It's clearly reached a level where a question will be asked whether this move is justified and that eventually will lead to some profit-taking," Saxo Bank analyst Ole Hansen said.

    Gold meanwhile has suffered from the all-encompassing strength of the US dollar, with other traditional safe havens such as the Japanese yen also losing out.

    Investors favouring the US dollar over gold has proved a double negative as a stronger greenback makes gold more expensive for buyers with other currencies, dampening demand. – Nampa/Reuters

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  • 12/06/18--14:00: High-flyer soars higher
  • High-flyer soars higherHigh-flyer soars higherPull Quote: “I love working with people and at Nust I get to meet people from all corners of our beautiful continent.” - Nust faculty officer, Gilbert ||Hoabeb. From a dreamer to an overachiever, with more accomplishments on the way. Elizabeth Joseph









    Gilbert ||Hoabeb was born in Windhoek and raised in the suburb of Katutura and holds a certificate in business management and a B.Com degree.

    He is also currently busy with his masters, with only his dissertation outstanding.

    He is the faculty officer at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST) in the management department under the faculty of management sciences.

    As the faculty officer, he represents the registrar and works closely with the dean, heads of department, lecturers and other academic and administrative staff.

    “My portfolio is empowered to direct, control, coordinate and to advise the dean, heads of department and the lecturers. My experience allows me to provide wide-ranging administrative support within the faculty, including supporting and contributing to the effective delivery of the Office of the Registrar’s procedures and processes.

    “As the representative of the registrar in the faculty, I am also the custodian of the university’s statutes and rules; I implement the rules and regulations and ensure compliance or enforcement at faculty and departmental level,” ||Hoabeb said.

    Although every day in the office is not the same, ||Hoabeb says there are several procedures to stick to, in order to make sure that the day goes as smoothly as possible.

    ||Hoabeb initially started at a South African-based private tertiary institution and this where his love and pure desire for the education sector and children started.

    “I love working with people and at Nust I get to meet people from all corners of our beautiful continent. I don’t think I would want to trade places with another career than what I have now.”

    Obstacles and victories

    ||Hoabeb says his duties has challenges and frustrations, but he never lets the negatives dictate who he is professionally. “What I can tell you is that the satisfaction always outweighs the challenges.

    “In the words of Menachem Begin, ‘Peace is the beauty of life. It is sunshine. It is the smile of a child, the love of a mother, the joy of a father, the togetherness of a family. It is the advancement of man, the victory of a just cause, the triumph of truth’,” ||Hoabeb said.



    The future

    ||Hoabeb has many goals and plans for the future and among these is to complete his masters’ degree in business management. He also wants to pursue and further a career in lecturing, and says he will do this on a part-time basis.

    “Also, a PhD is not far away, it has my name on it already.”

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  • 12/06/18--14:00: Enough is enough!
  • Enough is enough!Enough is enough! A five-day police operation conducted in all SADC countries has exposed rampant child neglect in Namibia, and it's shocking, too say the least.

    The crime-fighting operation, led by female police officers, resulted in the extraction of 56 children younger than 18 and nine mothers carrying babies from shebeens, bars and liquor stores over a period of just five days.

    All liquor outlet, bar and shebeen owners were given written warnings for allowing minors onto their premises and 182 illegal liquor outlets were closed out of the 714 inspected.

    Major-General Anna-Marie Nainda said child abuse incidents in Namibia are rising and need to be dealt with using the full might of the law.

    She said the neglect of children has become a burning and critical problem, and that if any children are found abandoned, roaming the streets without adequate supervision or are taken into places they are not supposed to be, “we are going to open criminal cases and we are going to arrest those people”.

    The police escorted mothers with young children from bars, shebeens and gambling houses during the operation.

    During an inspection at a Klein Windhoek gambling house in the early morning hours, the police discovered drunken teenage girls, who were promptly removed.

    This is indeed a shocking state of affairs as we enter the festive season.

    There has in any event been a surge in the most heinous crimes being perpetrated against the most vulnerable, and child neglect opens barn-sized windows of opportunity for criminals to strike.

    We call on the police to continue their quest to make examples of parents and guardians who neglect children or expose them to unsavoury places and situations.

    It is a source of great discomfort that children are being left at the mercy of bar patrons, or worse.

    Severe punitive measures need to be enforced without fear or favour, going forward.

    We cannot put the nation's children at risk in this way or play Russian roulette with their futures. Enough is enough!

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    LPM application to ECN 'not stalled'LPM application to ECN 'not stalled'Corrections were needed The Electoral Commission says all processes for the registration of political parties must be stringently followed. The Electoral Commission of Namibia (ECN) has shrugged off a suggestion that an application by the Landless People's Movement (LPM) for registration as a political party is stalled.

    An allegation doing the rounds in the ranks of the LPM is that the process to gazette the registration at the ministry of justice is being deliberately impeded for political expediency.

    The chief electoral officer of the ECN, Theo Mujoro, says there are various processes to be completed before the commission can give the go-ahead for the gazette office in the justice ministry to publish the registration of a political party.

    He says when the ECN receives an application for the registration of a political party, its data centre has to check each and every name of the more than 3 500 names for their declaration, voter registration numbers and regions and constituencies in which they are registered.

    This information is then provided to the commission to ensure the application complies with all the legal requirements.

    Mujoro says depending on the commission's decision, the more than 3 500 names and voter registration numbers would then be typed before being handed over to the directorate of legislative drafting in the justice ministry for perusal and certification.

    “[When] finalised, the information is provided to the Government Gazette office. They require a two-week period to prepare the notice for publication,” Mujoro said. The LPM applied for registration as political party on 9 September.

    The ECN says the time it takes to finalise the process includes the corrections or alterations that have to be made.

    It says it had to send the LPM's application documents back twice for corrections.

    So far, no other applications for the registration of new political parties have been submitted the ECN.

    STAFF REPORTER

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  • 12/06/18--14:00: Reed puts people first
  • Reed puts people firstReed puts people firstGreat strides bring great rewards Marsia Reed’s purpose in life is to make a lasting impact on the lives of people by motivating, listening, mentoring, connecting and guiding. Pull Quote: “It is incredibly exciting to see what people are doing with limited resources to change people’s lives.”- Marsia Reed, Lithon Foundation CEO. Elizabeth Joseph

    For Lithon Foundation CEO Marsia Reed, the purpose is people.

    Reed has always believed in living an impactful life.

    Reed is a Jill of all trades and holds a B.Com degree which she obtained from the University of Stellenbosch. She was a stay at home mother for 13 years, while running her own wellness business. She then moved on and was employed as the purchasing officer for Rössing and Group 5.

    Reed has not only made waves in the corporate world, but also in the sport industry. She was the sport organiser at Pionierspark Primary School for a few years and also the development manager at Cricket Namibia.

    Reed is now the CEO of the Lithon Foundation for the Lithon Project Consultants.

    “My purpose in life is to make a lasting impact on the lives of people by motivating, listening, mentoring, connecting and guiding. Being involved in the Lithon Foundation opened a huge platform for me to do exactly that, but on a much larger scale.

    “Through networking, significant impact is also made possible with welfare organisations; we believe by adding value, increasing their influence in communities and impacting through excellence and integrity, but remaining focused on people,” Reed said.

    Triumphs and trials

    The ‘Sharing the Dream’ breakfast, which the foundation hosted every second week this year, has provided an incredible platform for organisations and individuals to share their stories, passion, activities and dreams with other organisations and businesspeople, according to Reed.

    “The sessions are extremely successful because we are all desperate to hear good stories that uplift us and revive the hope that people are inherently good and want to help those who are less fortunate. The foundation’s executing arm, Impact for Life, was launched in October. The purpose is to provide a platform for interaction and collaboration between like-minded people and organisations to impact and improve people’s lives,” Reed said.

    Some of the challenges Reed has faced include the country’s dire economic situation, which forced the Lithon Foundation to terminate all financial support to various organisations, with whom the foundation has had relationships for more than 10 years.

    “The foundation, through the sponsorship of Lithon Project Consultants carrying our administrative costs, and by the grace of God alone, has been able to continue the passion of the foundation, to bring God’s love and hope to communities, despite having no funds available,” she added.

    Reed says they have been able to remain focused on bringing God’s love and hope to communities, by steering Impact for Life to execute dreams and address problems and partnering with organisations like Loving Thy Neighbour.

    A day in the office

    “A great deal of the day goes into administration, planning and networking. I also value talking to individuals and organisations, sharing information and learning from each other. Meetings are important to align ideas and plan ahead and sometimes I get the time to visit an organisation to see the successes and challenges they are facing daily,” she says.

    The next step

    “In 2019, Impact for Life will be activated with various identified projects for purpose and think tanks, which have already been establish to address national problems in Namibia. Our focus will be to ensure the network of leaders are aligned and focused in addressing problems productively, and executing to success.

    With the Ministry of Health and Social Services, the Lithon Foundation would like to present the first-ever Namibia Welfare Organisations Day, to promote cooperation and celebrate their achievements.

    “Following this event the foundation will assist the ministry to register all welfare organisations on the Loving Thy Neighbour platform, which will enable the ministry to have a clear understanding and insight of all activities and actions in the country.

    “Our focus will also be on creating a substantial fund to support national projects,” Reed added.

    Marsia Reed fact box:

    She has been married for 28 years.

    She has read the 66 books of the Bible this year.

    She loves rock music

    She loves camping with family and friends in nature.

    She has been to Sossusvlei 10 times.

    She enjoys CrossFit.

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    10 game-changing financial freedom tips10 game-changing financial freedom tips Fight the January headaches by following these easy steps Financial freedom: It can sound like a nice theory. But the truth is, it’s possible for anyone to achieve. And I mean anyone - even someone who once had tens of thousands in student loan debt like yours truly. No matter what financial troubles you have today, there’s always a way to get back to black.

    1. Understand where you’re at

    You can’t achieve financial freedom without knowing your starting point. Looking at how much debt you have, how much savings you don’t have, and how much money you need can be a depressing reality. But this is a valuable step in the right direction.

    Compile a list of all your debts: mortgage, student loans, car loan, credit cards, and any other debt you may have accumulated. Don’t forget to include any money you may have borrowed from friends or family members over the years.

    How much debt do you have?

    If it’s a big number, don’t freak out, I promise I’ll share some ways to pay that later in this article. If it’s a small number, congratulations!

    Next, take a look at all the money you have saved up.

    Compile a list of all your savings: savings accounts, stocks, company stock-matching programmes, company retirement-matching programmes, and retirement plans. Then we’ll add the recurring monthly payments you receive such as salary, side hustle money and so on.

    Keep these numbers in mind as we work through the next few financial freedom tips.

    2. Look at money positively

    Debt can definitely be a little bit discouraging.

    But remember that money is a good thing, even if it seems to carry a lot of burden right now.

    You deserve to achieve financial freedom.

    According to ‘You Are a Badass at Making Money’ by Jen Sincero, people who don’t make a lot of money often feel shame when it comes to making money. And so the biggest obstacle that many people experience when it comes to making money is that they feel like having money is bad. Many feel guilty for having it and guiltier for wanting it. Sincero said about money: “We use it every day to enhance our lives, yet we always seem to focus on the negative about it.”

    Money is simply a necessity like food or water. It helps you buy the things you need and live the life you want.

    To experience financial freedom, you’re going to need to look at money as a tool to help you achieve your dreams, fuel your energy and live a stress-free life you can enjoy.

    Because if you view money negatively, you’ll subconsciously sabotage your chances of making it and keeping it.

    3. Write down your goals

    Why do you need money? Do you want to get rid of debt for good? Are you desperate to escape the nine-to-five grind? Is there a place you’ve always wanted to travel to? Do you need to save for a wedding, kids, or retirement?

    When I achieved financial freedom, it was because I tied it to an emotional goal. My goal was to get out of student loan debt and save for my first home. And honestly, it was a euphoric experience watching the debt dwindle away and my savings rise.

    I got so excited by seeing the numbers change that I worked harder to make more money to see a bigger change in my personal finances. Would I have achieved my goal of financial freedom if I hadn’t tied the goal to something emotional? Probably not. I was desperate to get out of debt and move out of my parent’s house. That desperation kept me motivated throughout my journey.

    Knowing exactly what you want to achieve makes achieving financial freedom a million times easier.

    4. Track your spending

    An important step toward financial freedom is tracking your spending.

    You can use a tool like Mint, which will let you know how much money you’re spending, which categories you’ve overspent in, how much money is in all of your accounts, and how much debt you have.

    Another cool thing about Mint is that it allows you to set goals within the dashboard. You can keep track of your goals and know the exact month you’ll be expected to hit the goal based on how much money you put in. Thus, keeping you accountable and reminding you to keep putting money towards it for you.

    After using Mint for one month, I managed to save some extra money towards my new wedding fund goal. Mint helped me stay focused on my goal and pushed me towards creating more passive income to hit my financial milestones.

    5. Pay yourself first

    You’ve probably heard the expression “pay yourself first”. But in case you haven’t, “pay yourself first” means putting a specific amount of money in your savings account before paying anything else, such as bills. And the act of paying yourself first has helped countless people inch closer to achieving financial freedom. Why? Because if you want to pay yourself US$1 000 per pay period first, then whatever’s left over needs to go towards bills. And if you don’t have enough to cover those bills, then you’re forced to pick up a side income to make up the costs.

    By paying yourself first, you guarantee that you’re always putting money aside to invest in yourself. By doing the opposite, you only get whatever is left over, which usually isn’t substantial enough to help you experience financial freedom.

    You can pay yourself first in other ways too. For example, if your company has a retirement savings programme, you can ask to have money withdrawn for your retirement. That way you’re investing in yourself and your future first. The money gets deducted from your pay so everything that’s left over is money that you can put aside for your bills and expenses.

    6. Spend less

    In 1958, Warren Buffett purchased a five bedroom home for US$31 500 and hasn’t moved out of it since. His net worth? An astounding US$90.3 billion. He can afford a bigger and more expensive home. But his frugality might very well be the reason why he’s one of the world’s richest people.

    Kanye West, on the other hand, isn’t afraid to flaunt his money. He lives in a US$20 million mansion. And at one point, with US$53 million of debt, he decided to ask Mark Zuckerberg for US$1 billion… on Twitter.

    The difference between the two super successful gentlemen? Buffet didn’t spend more than he needed to, and West spends money he doesn’t have.

    The truth is, plenty of rich people don’t look like rich people. Zuckerberg literally wears the same boring T-shirt and jeans every day.

    Buying less stuff can actually help you get richer.

    By spending less, two things work in your favour. One, you’ll have more money to put aside for your financial freedom. Two, you’ll learn that you actually need a lot less stuff to survive, which also helps you put aside more money.

    7. Buy experiences not things

    Life’s short. It’s not about hoarding all your cash until you’re 65. You’re allowed to enjoy life while you’re alive.

    Ultimately, the things that’ll help you live a more fulfilled life will be the experiences you have, not the products you own.

    And are the things you buy making you happier over the long-term? Does the debt you have from buying a bunch of stuff make your life easier?

    What’s your happiest memory? What were you doing? Who were you with?

    Maybe you have a friend you love working out with. Invite her over to work out to a YouTube playlist at home for free.

    You’ve always dreamed of travelling to Rome. You’ve been saving up money for a year to experience your dream vacation. Go on that vacation feeling guilt-free. You didn’t go into debt for it, you’ve earned it. Or you can become a digital nomad and travel the world while working abroad.

    Life is made up of moments. The best ones come from quality time spent with friends and family. While some products can help bring you closer to your family (like a weekly family video game night) most of them don’t add much value.

    8. Pay off debt

    Some people will tell you it’s wiser to invest your money in stocks instead of paying off your debt. If you’re an expert stock picker, maybe that’s true. But if you’ve never invested in stocks before, you could wind up with more debt.

    While paying someone else isn’t as glamorous as having money in the bank, it does bring you closer to financial freedom.

    There are two main methods of paying off debt: Snowball and avalanche. Snowball is when you pay off the smallest debt first. Avalanche is when you pay off the debt with the highest interest rate.

    Paying off a big debt lifts a massive weight off your shoulders. After paying off your debt, you see the amount of money you have in the bank rise. It’s an awesome feeling watching the number climb (even if you had to watch it fall at the beginning), and it keeps you motivated to continue growing it.

    9. Create additional sources of income

    Okay, so at this point, you’re probably thinking: “My debt is a lot more than my salary, how can I pay it off if I don’t make enough?”

    If you’re serious about financial freedom, you’ve got to sacrifice some blood, sweat, and tears.

    Your nine-to-five might not cut it. If that’s the case, you need to step it up and look for money outside your current job.

    Some experts recommend having seven streams of income. If you have a nine-to-five job, congratulations, you have one, only six more to go!

    Now, you can look at your sources of income in two ways: active income (trading time for money) or passive income (money that can keep coming in, even while you sleep).

    If you trade your time for money, you’re limited by the hours of the day. Here are a few side jobs you can do to earn an active income.

    10. Invest in your future

    The last financial freedom tip is an important one. Say you follow the advice and recommendations in this article, get out of debt, and grow your savings. That might be enough to help you out right now. But what if the unexpected happens? Will you be prepared for it?

    It’s important to set aside money for rainy days, retirement, and (sorry to be morbid here) in case you die, to help ensure your family doesn’t drown paying for your funeral, debts and taxes. Okay, now let’s get back to that happy place.

    An emergency fund is only for unplanned emergencies like a tree crashing onto your house, a car accident you need to pay for out of pocket or a visit to the hospital.

    By setting aside money for rainy days and retirement, you’ll be less likely to end up back to where you are now - wishing for financial freedom.

    Nicole Martins Ferreira

    https://www.oberlo.com/blog/financial-freedom

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  • 12/06/18--14:00: Millers in vetkoek fight
  • Millers in vetkoek fightMillers in vetkoek fightNamib Mills sues Bokomo Namib Mills wants the High Court to stop Bokomo selling a vetkoek flour mix in packaging that closely resembles its equivalent Bakpro product. Namib Mills is suing Bokomo Namibia for alleged unfair competition and wants the High Court to interdict Bokomo from selling its 'vetkoek flour mix' in its current packaging.

    In his founding affidavit before the High Court, Pieter van Niekerk, commercial manager at Namib Mills, sets out the company's argument why the packaging constitutes uncompetitive behaviour by Bokomo Namibia.

    He claims that Bokomo intentionally chose the design of its packaging “in order to benefit from the equity of the Namib Mills brand” in Namibia.

    Bokomo's majority shareholder is South African giant Pioneer Foods, a listed company that recorded just over R10 billion in revenue in 2017.

    Van Niekerk claims that Bokomo has “appropriated a significant element of Namib Mills' get-up [packaging]”. He told the court that Namib Mills is the largest grain-processing company in Namibia, selling maize meal, wheat flour and pasta, and packaged rice and sugar.

    “It sells these under its trademark Bakpro and, in particular, the distinctive get-up of these products.” The brand has worked since 1982 for its equity. Packaging plays a very big part in this, he explained.

    “This get-up is well known and is relied upon by purchasers in the buying process. It has three constituent characteristics: The top two-thirds is white with the brand Bakpro appearing in the top third, a picture of cake or bread in the middle of the pack, and the bottom third shows a slash or band in a particular colour.

    “Apart from the colour brown, for the brown bread wheat flour product, there is no relation to the product in the colours of the slashes adorning the packs.”

    Namib Mills, Van Niekerk said, researched the particular mix of bread and cake flour to produce the ideal dough for vetkoek, ensuring minimal absorption of oil during the frying process, and introduced this mix as an “innovative product to the Namibian market”.





    The packaging, because it forms part of the Bakpro product range, was packaged in a similar get-up but the colour slash is mustard-yellow.

    Van Niekerk said Bokomo's cake and bread flour sales were detrimentally affected after the introduction of the vetkoek mix, which did exceptionally well in the market. At its introduction in January 2018, 42 tonnes were sold and by August, sales had climbed to 880 tonnes.

    “What is also relevant is that the new vetkoek flour product cannibalised sales directly from Bokomo's white bread flour. Namib Mills' staff reported that Bokomo was driven to selling stock very close to its expiry date at discounted prices at wholesalers. This is relevant because it is no doubt what prompted Bokomo into introducing vetkoek flour in its unlawful packaging.”

    Van Niekerk spoke at length of brand visual equity and a brand's visual assets.

    “There are phenomena recognised by marketing experts as being a basis upon which consumers make purchasing decisions, because it is such features which influence their thought processes at the time of purchase. No doubt, this is well appreciated by Bokomo which is why it has adopted the essential elements of Namib Mills' visual assets for its competing product.”

    He explained the marketing campaigns that Namib Mills invested in to promote its vetkoek flour.

    “It is relevant and material that the marketing strategy has been, and continues to be, to focus on the distinctive mustard-yellow.”

    More than N$1.7 million was spent on marketing the brand, he said. In summary, Van Niekerk told the High Court, “The various forms of advertising of the product have compounded the equity that exists in the pack design, but in particular the mustard-yellow colour, as signifying Namib Mills' vetkoek flour”.

    He charged that the packaging of Bokomo's other products differs significantly from that of Namib Mills' Bakpro range.

    “Comparing them with Namib Mills' product, one will notice how radical the changes are and how the new pack appropriates several features of Namib Mills' pack design architecture.

    “I challenge Bokomo to take the court into its confidence and make a full and candid disclosure of all aspects relating to the design of the pack for its vetkoek flour product.

    “Namib Mills has reasonable grounds to believe that the design was intentional, in order capitalise on and benefit from Namib Mills' reputation.”

    Van Niekerk drew the court's attention to what is referred to as 'category language'. He explained that both Namib Mills and Bokomo, along with others in the market, package brown bread flour with a brown colour scheme while the colour scheme for white bread flour is blue.

    “Yet, there is no category known as vetkoek flour.”

    According to Van Niekerk, there was no reason for Bokomo's packaging to feature the mustard-yellow colour chosen by Namib Mills.

    “Bokomo's doing the same, coupled with its significantly amended pack architecture, can only be explained by an intention to appropriate benefit from the existing reputation vesting the get-up of Namib Mills' vetkoek flour product, or to cause confusion in the market, or both.”

    Bokomo, in its response, chose to deal with technicalities.

    Replying to Van Niekerk, Hubertus Hamm, CEO of Bokomo Namibia, dealt extensively with the lack of urgency of the application. He accused Namib Mills of causing the delays and added that “any perceived urgency was therefore created by Namib Mills itself”. He told the court that essentially, Bokomo Namibia is not a party to the proceedings as it was incorrectly cited as “Bokomo Foods” in the court papers.

    He quoted another High Court matter in which the respondent was incorrectly cited. That application was dismissed with costs due to the incorrect naming of the respondent.

    Hamm added that it took Namib Mills two months to complete its founding affidavit, “yet it is of the view that anyone opposing the relief sought should be deprived of proper opportunity to oppose the relief”.

    He also denied that “irreparable harm” would be caused, describing it as a “bold allegation with no substantiation whatsoever”.

    Before Justice Hosea Angula yesterday, Bokomo did not defend and the parties agreed to bring amendments with the application proceeding before the court on 13 February next year.

    Tobias Louw from Theunissen, Louw and Partners appeared for Namib Mills while Daneale Beukes from Engling, Stritter and Partners appeared for Bokomo Namibia.

    YANNA SMITH

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    Running on empty: San kids in dire straitsRunning on empty: San kids in dire straits Cocoma Primary School, which accommodates about 200 learners from marginalised communities in the Kavango East Region, is desperately in need of help.

    School principal Moses Ndumba says the school is in dire straits. There is a lack of classrooms and furniture, no electricity and barely any food to eat. He said only half the learners sit on chairs.

    Ndumba shared how the learners, the majority of whom are from the San community, are battling each day.

    The school is situated in the Ndiyona constituency, about 160 km from Rundu, and was established in the 1970s as a mobile unit.





    It made use of temporary structures until 2015, when the government constructed permanent ones.

    The school offers pre-primary education up to grade 4 and the 204 learners are being taught by three teachers, including the principal.

    “The situation is so bad, because if you look at the backgrounds of these learners it is a challenge. Most of the children are from the San community, some are orphans and others are on medication. We are only three teachers who have to care for all these learners,” Ndumba said. The school also has a makeshift hostel that accommodates about 124 learners. The hostel was constructed by the community and consists of four huts.

    This means that about 30 learners sleep in one hut, which is a bad situation, but there is no alternative.

    “Learners used to walk more than 20 km a day to come to school before I initiated the community hostel. It is not what we think is best, but at least it is making a difference,” Ndumba explained.

    If it was not for the hostel, fewer than 50 learners would be able to attend school, he said.

    He said when he arrived at the school in 2008, only 24 learners turned up. Ndumba said because of the poor turnout, he had to go into the community to engage parents, most of whom work on commercial farms. He said some of the learners were picked up along the river and he decided to educate them. “I was concerned to observe so many children in the community, but only 24 were attending school; that is why I had to do what I did,” Ndumba said.

    He said at the time only three out of the 24 learners were from the San community. However, this year 75% of the 204 learners are from that community.

    He said the children now love school.

    “Some of the children dropped out of school, not because they do not like it, but because of hunger. What can we do if we only have limited food per day?” Ndumba said. He said when it comes to the hostel, he and the two teachers have to spend their own money to feed the children.

    “These children are eating from our pockets. They do not pay for hostel accommodation, as we know they are from marginalised communities and some of them are orphans.”

    Ndumba said only sometimes during “out weekends”, the learners return with a few food items from their homes.

    Asked whether they are part of government's school feeding programme, Ndumba said they only received food through the programme on two occasions.

    He said the only support they get from the Kavango East education regional directorate is transport services, when the learners return home for school breaks.



    Needs

    Ndumba said the school needs two more classrooms, as well as a principal's office and electrification.

    They also need proper hostel accommodation. Kavango East education director Fanuel Kapapero said his office is well aware of the situation at the school. Kapapero said they have offered assistance when they can. He called on the Office of the Vice-President to come on board, because it advocates for marginalised communities to be educated.

    Ndumba wrote a letter to Vice-president Nangolo Mbumba on 14 October but has not yet received a response. Ndumba also shared that a Chinese school based at the Amitofo Care Centre in Okahandja has adopted four of his learners, who are receiving free education. Another group of ten learners will benefit next year.

    KENYA KAMBOWE

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  • 12/07/18--14:00: Take them out to play
  • Take them out to playTake them out to play Vinoliah Mangaba

    For a number of children from orphanages in Windhoek, the world outside is not quite well-known.

    Schedules are super-strict. Schools are not far from their orphanages and playgrounds are close. Basically all essentials are at their doorsteps.

    The Noble Foundation decided to take the children out to have some fun.

    The foundation is a youth organisation that aims for sustainable development.

    It believes that this kind of development can only take place if we nurture each other. Three orphanages were invited: the SOS Children's Village, Orlindi Orphanage and Dolam Children's Home.

    The children were delighted to have a day well-spent at the Academia Secondary School’s sports field, where they indulged in different sport codes and fun activities.

    The majority of the sport codes were miniature games, so the younger children could also be included.

    The turnout was splendid. There was also a football tournament for older youth, which was used as a way to raise funds.

    Miss Outapi, Tracy Kayofa, made an appearance. She said the fun day was an amazing experience and that she had lots of fun, as she felt so comfortable with the children. Kayofa spent a number of years in an orphanage and was able to relate to the children's joy. She says she was honoured to be part of the event and wishes to be a part of many others.

    The fun day had many sponsors. Some of the sponsors were private individuals and the rest were large companies.

    The companies were Red Bull, OTB Sport, Mpact Packaging, The Spot, Shoprite/Checkers, the Confab and SVG Multi Civil Engineers. A special thanks also went to Herman Rust, the principal of Academia Secondary School for availing the sports field for the day.

    Patricia Doeses, the head of the Noble Foundation and her team were indeed glad that the day was a great success.

    Doeses wishes to bring a harmonious relationship between all welfare organisations and societies.

    One of the Orlindi Orphanage home mothers said she was grateful for the day, as the children are kept within the facility immediately after they get home from school. Their friends are also in the orphanage, so they never really go out to socialise and have fun. Many of the children said they were really happy to just get away from their usual daily routine. The 10th of November will surely remain in the memories of all who participated and contributed in one way or another.

    * Vinoliah Mangaba is a grade 12 learner at Academia Secondary School in Windhoek.

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    Young hockey players rewardedYoung hockey players rewarded The Namibian Hockey Union (NHU) recently hosted the 2018 Bank Windhoek Junior Hockey Development League awards ceremony at the Windhoek Gymnasium Private School.

    Medals were awarded to the under-10, 12 and 14 age groups in both the boys and girls A and B divisions.

    Saint Paul’s College won the girls’ u-10 A section competition, followed by Pioneers Park Primary School.

    The boys’ under-10 A section was also scooped by Saint Paul’s College, with Windhoek Gymnasium walking away with the second spot.

    The girls’ u-12 A section belonged to Windhoek Gymnasium, who were followed home by St George's Diocesan School.

    Windhoek Gymnasium and Windhoek Afrikaans Private School took the first and second prizes in the boys’ u-12 A section, respectively.

    The girls’ u-14 A section was won by Saint Paul’s College and Windhoek Afrikaans Private School were the runners-up.

    The boys’ u-14 A section was won by Windhoek Afrikaans Private School, followed by Windhoek Gymnasium.

    The development league kicked off in June and concluded in mid-August.

    It had a record entry of 95 teams from 10 different schools. The matches took place at the Windhoek Gymnasium and Wanderers hockey fields in Windhoek.

    “The league is an NHU hockey development programme initiative. It aims to develop the sport of hockey in Namibia by educating and grooming talented young hockey players. Despite challenges such as lack of resources for some schools, the junior hockey league continues to grow,” said Bank Windhoek’s head of corporate affairs, Hayley Allen.

    “Through the partnership with Bank Windhoek, the NHU is in the process of re-introducing hockey into schools and in the regions that have stopped playing the sport due to a lack of equipment and coaches.

    “This partnership started in 2015 and so far nine coaching clinics for coaches and children took place in seven regions in Namibia,” said NHU vice-president, Conrad Wessels.

    “We would like to congratulate the winning and participants teams for putting up incredible performances during the leagues fixtures. Thank you to Bank Windhoek for making this possible,” said Wessels.

    The B section winners were as follows:

    Girls’ u-10 -

    Winners: Saint Paul’s College B

    Runners-up: Saint Paul’s College C

    Boys’ u-10 -

    Winners: Windhoek Gymnasium

    Runners-up: Saint Paul’s College B

    Girls’ u-12 -

    Winners: Saint Paul’s College B

    Runners-up: Windhoek Afrikaans Private School

    Boys’ under-12 -

    Winners: Saint Paul’s College

    Runners-up: Windhoek Afrikaans Private School

    Girls’ u-14 -

    Winners: Namutoni Primary School

    Runners-up: Eros Primary School

    Boys’ u-14 -

    Winners: Namutoni Primary School

    Runners-up: Eros Primary School

    SPORTS REPORTER

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  • 12/07/18--14:00: Giving back
  • Giving back Giving back Young Miss Otavi Primary, Devonishia Vicky Utale, teamed up with Otavi town council to support the Otavi Health Centre’s Soup Kitchen, by providing them with food packages. The soup kitchen caters for underprivileged residents who take strong medication, so they can eat before taking their tablets. Devonishia (8) requested the town council’s help to run her ‘Help me to help the needy campaign’ and Otavi Agra, Otavi Sentra and town council staff come to her aid and staunchly supported her campaign. Devonishia was delighted and expressed her gratitude towards Otavi Agra, Otavi Spar and the town council for their contributions and called on others to follow their good example.

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  • 12/07/18--14:00: Changing lives
  • Changing livesChanging livesReschelle’s classroom project a success Mount View High School truly is an example of Namibians coming together. Michelline Nawatises



    The aim of Miss High School finalist Reschelle Beukes’ project was to aid Mount View High School pupils who are currently taught in tents as classrooms

    The school is located in Okahandja Park, Windhoek, and was introduced to Reschelle by the Institutional Planning Department at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (Nust).

    When they became aware of the circumstances of the learners and teachers, they decided to work closely with the community to facilitate a better learning and teaching environment.

    Reschelle was deeply moved by the students and teachers and made the decision to aid them in alleviating some of the challenges they face.

    The principal, Brian Ndabeni, outlined the history of the school. He said it was begun to service a critical need within the community in 2015 and currently educates 450 learners with 14 teachers.

    The 2017, the grade 10s were ranked 14th regionally in the JSC examinations, an extraordinary achievement when you consider that they are taught in tents and some of the teachers have to store teaching materials in their cars.

    Next year will see the school begin its first grade 12 classes, with the very students it began with in 2015.

    Reschelle will be completing her grade 12 at Windhoek High School next year and was determined to provide at least one classroom to aid the prospective Mount View grade 12s.

    Reschelle’s mother, Lindie Beukes, said: “As a mother I am extremely proud of all her achievements; she is the deputy head girl for 2018/2019 at Windhoek High School and the current Miss Windhoek High School, a finalist for Miss High School Namibia, as well as the current junior mayor of Windhoek. These roles are a great learning experience, but very demanding and for her to still achieve academically, she has had to learn time-management skills that I, as her mother, can only marvel at.”

    Linda Kaurembi, a grade 11 learner at Mount View, said they will be forever grateful for Reschelle’s project.

    “Knowing that we will be able to sit in a classroom next year is a great feeling, thank you Reschelle for stretching out your hand upon our school.”

    The project would not have been a success without the sponsors, who so generously joined hands with Reschelle, and it is because of this generosity that the project has affectionately become known as Tulikuminineni.

    Each one of the sponsors contributed significantly, not only financially but their knowledge and insight, which ensured the successful completion of the first three phases.

    A special thanks went out to Norbert Liebich, director of Container World, who believed in Reschelle from the beginning and worked hard to make the project a reality.

    The Ohlthaver & List (O&L) Group, which had in the past sponsored numerous classrooms at developing schools, came on board by sponsoring the containerised classroom, in support of their group purpose which is “creating a future, enhance life”.

    The placement was made possible with the aid of Windhoek Hire and Sales. Reschelle was overjoyed to be able to work with her granddad, Andries Philander, who assisted her with the building of the foundation for the classroom.

    The foundation for the classroom could not have been built without the aid of the cement donated by Ohorongo Cement; The Pupkewitz Foundation and the generous personal donation of Neavera Tjivikua, an institutional planner at Nust, assisted with the payment of the labourers.

    Wise Masters Builders came on board and in a very short time provided bricks for the foundation; and finally Build It also came through and contributed the sand needed for the construction of the foundation. Last but not least, Victor Boshoff CEO of Neo Paints assisted Reschelle to refurbish and paint the classroom.

    With the support of the principal, teachers and learners of Windhoek High School, stationery will be donated to kick off the school year for the learners of Mount View High.

    However, the work at Mount View is not complete, as Nust will still carry on providing skills training to both the staff and learners, as well as raise funds for uniforms and a feeding scheme for the learners.

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    The joy and love in Christmas carols The joy and love in Christmas carols Justicia Shipena

    Some people dislike December because they hate hearing Christmas music everywhere they go, or because standing in those long lines to purchase your favourite snack is unbearable. I don’t think I am one of those people. Christmas music is one of the few things that bridges the gap between different genres and brings many people together.

    There are the classics, the ones that our parents and grandparents grew up with, singing along to. Nat King Cole’s rendition of Silent Night, Bing Crosby and David Bowie singing Little Drummer Boy and Barenaked Ladies’ God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen, are all near the top of my ideal Christmas playlist.

    Then there are the pop carols by NSYNC which is a boy band that broke up in 2002 but their carols such as Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays still continue to bring up cheer to many. Other pop carols include Justin Bieber’s Mistletoe, Band Aid’s oddly racist Do They Know It’s Christmas.

    Most are forgettable. But one of these newer attempts is, in fact, a near perfect Christmas song. Mariah Carey’s All I Want For Christmas Is You is that song which was released 24 years ago and it’s pretty trendy to complain about this song, so I think it’s necessary to defend its honour this and every holiday season.

    Other declarations of love are more subtle, quiet and safe, but Mariah doesn’t want subtle or quiet or safe. In her song All I Want For Christmas Is You, the love Mariah feels is bursting at the seams and there’s nothing she can do but belt a high A about it.

    There’s something liberating about how happy this song is. Mariah’s affections may be unrequited, but she’s not going to let that stop her. Her earnest devotion is probably part of the reason why people think they don’t like it. Her openness and unabashed emotion make them uncomfortable in a culture where we are supposed to hide our feelings all the time. Mariah’s not hiding anything.

    So here is the truth during the Christmas season, no one wants to be alone. Christmas, more than any other holiday, including Valentine’s Day, is about love. From a theological perspective, it’s John 3:16: “God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son that who so believeth in him should not perish but have eternal life.” That’s the greatest love of all.

    However secularly, gifts are bought, cards are exchanged and families and friends gather round all because of love and we come together to remember what’s really important: each other and the love we share.

    Yes, this is a little schmaltzy, but Christmas is the one time of the year when it’s okay to be schmaltzy. Have you seen Love Actually? The theme of that movie is that love actually is all around, but it’s especially all around at Christmas. That’s a theme I can get behind.

    But when you’re surrounded by so much schmaltz and the love is not present, it’s a little less merry and bright. This brings me back to Mariah’s song. I had a conversation with mid-20s woman and she told me that almost every Christmas, she has earnestly sung along because her words resonate. She does not care about the gifts she receives but she just wants love for her own, more than the other person could ever know. All she wants for Christmas is you.

    If this column was part of one of the vignettes in Love Actually, this paragraph would identify who that “you” is, but that’s sort of irrelevant at the moment. The magic of the song is that everyone has a “you”. After all, if the song only resonated with a few people, it wouldn’t be so popular. But many singers have recorded their own, inferior versions because it speaks to all of us.

    Maybe it’s someone you have a crush on, maybe it’s your long-distance girlfriend or maybe it’s your family who you won’t see on Christmas Day. It might be a little needy or selfish, but we all just want love for Christmas. Mariah’s right… no amount of gifts could ever change this human desire.

    In general, I think the many different cultures in Namibia place too strong of an emphasis on romantic love as the most important or only relationship we can have, and that we don’t value our platonic bonds enough. So I don’t mean to suggest that the platonic friendships I will celebrate all month long aren’t as important as a hypothetical relationship with a hypothetical boyfriend.

    After all, my favourite plot in Love Actually is about the friendship between an aging rock star and his manager. The love I have for my family and friends is important and life-sustaining and wonderful. But sometimes, when the mistletoe comes out, and the couples cuddle and I’m left with visions of unrequited love dancing in my head, it’s good to know Mariah’s got my back with the song I’ll be singing in the shower all month long.

    I end by saying, we are all hyped by what we can do and enjoy in the holiday hence I urge you all to do it responsibly. Remember to sing along and happy festive season!

    justicia@myzone.com.na

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    Young hockey players rewardedYoung hockey players rewarded The Namibian Hockey Union (NHU) recently hosted the 2018 Bank Windhoek Junior Hockey Development League awards ceremony at the Windhoek Gymnasium Private School.

    Medals were awarded to the under-10, 12 and 14 age groups in both the boys and girls A and B divisions.

    Saint Paul’s College won the girls’ u-10 A section competition, followed by Pioneers Park Primary School.

    The boys’ under-10 A section was also scooped by Saint Paul’s College, with Windhoek Gymnasium walking away with the second spot.

    The girls’ u-12 A section belonged to Windhoek Gymnasium, who were followed home by St George's Diocesan School.

    Windhoek Gymnasium and Windhoek Afrikaans Private School took the first and second prizes in the boys’ u-12 A section, respectively.

    The girls’ u-14 A section was won by Saint Paul’s College and Windhoek Afrikaans Private School were the runners-up.

    The boys’ u-14 A section was won by Windhoek Afrikaans Private School, followed by Windhoek Gymnasium.

    The development league kicked off in June and concluded in mid-August.

    It had a record entry of 95 teams from 10 different schools. The matches took place at the Windhoek Gymnasium and Wanderers hockey fields in Windhoek.

    “The league is an NHU hockey development programme initiative. It aims to develop the sport of hockey in Namibia by educating and grooming talented young hockey players. Despite challenges such as lack of resources for some schools, the junior hockey league continues to grow,” said Bank Windhoek’s head of corporate affairs, Hayley Allen.

    “Through the partnership with Bank Windhoek, the NHU is in the process of re-introducing hockey into schools and in the regions that have stopped playing the sport due to a lack of equipment and coaches.

    “This partnership started in 2015 and so far nine coaching clinics for coaches and children took place in seven regions in Namibia,” said NHU vice-president, Conrad Wessels.

    “We would like to congratulate the winning and participants teams for putting up incredible performances during the leagues fixtures. Thank you to Bank Windhoek for making this possible,” said Wessels.

    The B section winners were as follows:

    Girls’ u-10 -

    Winners: Saint Paul’s College B

    Runners-up: Saint Paul’s College C

    Boys’ u-10 -

    Winners: Windhoek Gymnasium

    Runners-up: Saint Paul’s College B

    Girls’ u-12 -

    Winners: Saint Paul’s College B

    Runners-up: Windhoek Afrikaans Private School

    Boys’ under-12 -

    Winners: Saint Paul’s College

    Runners-up: Windhoek Afrikaans Private School

    Girls’ u-14 -

    Winners: Namutoni Primary School

    Runners-up: Eros Primary School

    Boys’ u-14 -

    Winners: Namutoni Primary School

    Runners-up: Eros Primary School

    0 0

    Young hockey players rewardedYoung hockey players rewarded The Namibian Hockey Union (NHU) recently hosted the 2018 Bank Windhoek Junior Hockey Development League awards ceremony at the Windhoek Gymnasium Private School.

    Medals were awarded to the under-10, 12 and 14 age groups in both the boys and girls A and B divisions.

    Saint Paul’s College won the girls’ u-10 A section competition, followed by Pioneers Park Primary School.

    The boys’ under-10 A section was also scooped by Saint Paul’s College, with Windhoek Gymnasium walking away with the second spot.

    The girls’ u-12 A section belonged to Windhoek Gymnasium, who were followed home by St George's Diocesan School.

    Windhoek Gymnasium and Windhoek Afrikaans Private School took the first and second prizes in the boys’ u-12 A section, respectively.

    The girls’ u-14 A section was won by Saint Paul’s College and Windhoek Afrikaans Private School were the runners-up.

    The boys’ u-14 A section was won by Windhoek Afrikaans Private School, followed by Windhoek Gymnasium.

    The development league kicked off in June and concluded in mid-August.

    It had a record entry of 95 teams from 10 different schools. The matches took place at the Windhoek Gymnasium and Wanderers hockey fields in Windhoek.

    “The league is an NHU hockey development programme initiative. It aims to develop the sport of hockey in Namibia by educating and grooming talented young hockey players. Despite challenges such as lack of resources for some schools, the junior hockey league continues to grow,” said Bank Windhoek’s head of corporate affairs, Hayley Allen.

    “Through the partnership with Bank Windhoek, the NHU is in the process of re-introducing hockey into schools and in the regions that have stopped playing the sport due to a lack of equipment and coaches.

    “This partnership started in 2015 and so far nine coaching clinics for coaches and children took place in seven regions in Namibia,” said NHU vice-president, Conrad Wessels.

    “We would like to congratulate the winning and participants teams for putting up incredible performances during the leagues fixtures. Thank you to Bank Windhoek for making this possible,” said Wessels.

    The B section winners were as follows:

    Girls’ u-10 -

    Winners: Saint Paul’s College B

    Runners-up: Saint Paul’s College C

    Boys’ u-10 -

    Winners: Windhoek Gymnasium

    Runners-up: Saint Paul’s College B

    Girls’ u-12 -

    Winners: Saint Paul’s College B

    Runners-up: Windhoek Afrikaans Private School

    Boys’ under-12 -

    Winners: Saint Paul’s College

    Runners-up: Windhoek Afrikaans Private School

    Girls’ u-14 -

    Winners: Namutoni Primary School

    Runners-up: Eros Primary School

    Boys’ u-14 -

    Winners: Namutoni Primary School

    Runners-up: Eros Primary School

    SPORTS REPORTER

    0 0
  • 12/10/18--14:00: Giving back
  • Giving back Giving back Young Miss Otavi Primary, Devonishia Vicky Utale, teamed up with Otavi town council to support the Otavi Health Centre’s Soup Kitchen, by providing them with food packages. The soup kitchen caters for underprivileged residents who take strong medication, so they can eat before taking their tablets. Devonishia (8) requested the town council’s help to run her ‘Help me to help the needy campaign’ and Otavi Agra, Otavi Sentra and town council staff come to her aid and staunchly supported her campaign. Devonishia was delighted and expressed her gratitude towards Otavi Agra, Otavi Spar and the town council for their contributions and called on others to follow their good example.

    0 0
  • 12/10/18--14:00: Take them out to play
  • Take them out to playTake them out to play Vinoliah Mangaba

    For a number of children from orphanages in Windhoek, the world outside is not quite well-known.

    Schedules are super-strict. Schools are not far from their orphanages and playgrounds are close. Basically all essentials are at their doorsteps.

    The Noble Foundation decided to take the children out to have some fun.

    The foundation is a youth organisation that aims for sustainable development.

    It believes that this kind of development can only take place if we nurture each other. Three orphanages were invited: the SOS Children's Village, Orlindi Orphanage and Dolam Children's Home.

    The children were delighted to have a day well-spent at the Academia Secondary School’s sports field, where they indulged in different sport codes and fun activities.

    The majority of the sport codes were miniature games, so the younger children could also be included.

    The turnout was splendid. There was also a football tournament for older youth, which was used as a way to raise funds.

    Miss Outapi, Tracy Kayofa, made an appearance. She said the fun day was an amazing experience and that she had lots of fun, as she felt so comfortable with the children. Kayofa spent a number of years in an orphanage and was able to relate to the children's joy. She says she was honoured to be part of the event and wishes to be a part of many others.

    The fun day had many sponsors. Some of the sponsors were private individuals and the rest were large companies.

    The companies were Red Bull, OTB Sport, Mpact Packaging, The Spot, Shoprite/Checkers, the Confab and SVG Multi Civil Engineers. A special thanks also went to Herman Rust, the principal of Academia Secondary School for availing the sports field for the day.

    Patricia Doeses, the head of the Noble Foundation and her team were indeed glad that the day was a great success.

    Doeses wishes to bring a harmonious relationship between all welfare organisations and societies.

    One of the Orlindi Orphanage home mothers said she was grateful for the day, as the children are kept within the facility immediately after they get home from school. Their friends are also in the orphanage, so they never really go out to socialise and have fun. Many of the children said they were really happy to just get away from their usual daily routine. The 10th of November will surely remain in the memories of all who participated and contributed in one way or another.

    * Vinoliah Mangaba is a grade 12 learner at Academia Secondary School in Windhoek.

    0 0

    Spurs face make-or-break Barcelona clashSpurs face make-or-break Barcelona clash Tottenham are sitting pretty in the Premier League but face a potentially season-defining match against Barcelona in the Champions League on Tuesday.

    Mauricio Pochettino's men have amassed 36 points from 16 Premier League matches, with 12 wins, leaving them in third place behind Liverpool and Manchester City. That they have managed that despite playing in their temporary home of Wembley and after a World Cup in which so many of their players featured until the final weekend, makes their achievement all the more impressive. However, with City and Liverpool in such rampant form, few expect Spurs to win the Premier League, putting increased emphasis on their match against the Spanish league leaders in Group B. Pochettino must somehow find a way past Lionel Messi's Barcelona to reach the knockout stages but he remains positive ahead of the daunting trip to the Camp Nou to face the five-time European champions.

    “It will be a massive game. They have qualified for the next stage but in the Champions League no one is going to give a present,” said the Argentine, who left Harry Kane out of the starting line-up for the 2-0 win away to Leicester on Saturday.

    “We need to win and deserve to win. The mentality is going to be 200% to try to win. We are going to arrive in the best condition, Barcelona are one of the best teams in Europe.”

    Spurs took just one point from their first three games in Group B, losing to Inter Milan and Barcelona and drawing with PSV.

    But they beat PSV at home and then scored late through Christian Eriksen to beat Inter 1-0 at Wembley, leaving them in second place on seven points, the same as the Italians.

    With Barcelona already guaranteed to top the group, Spurs must match Inter's result to guarantee progress.

    Pochettino has in the past talked about how only the Premier League or Champions League title will take the club to the “next level”, even though the trophy cabinet has been empty since 2008.

    Spurs have played in the Champions League for the past three seasons but they cannot boast the pedigree or history of Manchester United or Liverpool in Europe's top club competition. They have only progressed beyond the Champions League group stage twice, reaching the quarter-finals in 2011. Barcelona, who beat Spurs 4-2 at Wembley, have already made sure of winning their Champions League group for a record 12th successive season.

    Dauntingly for Spurs, Barca are unbeaten in 28 Champions League home matches and the Londoners will not be encouraged by the fact that the Spaniards have only lost two home matches in 33 against English opponents. But Spurs themselves, with a vibrant collection of attacking players including Kane, Eriksen, Dele Alli and Son Heung-min, have won eight out of their past nine fixtures in all competitions and will be hoping that Ernesto Valverde's side take their foot off the gas. Beating the Catalan club would be particularly sweet for Pochettino, a former player and coach at Barcelona's city rivals Espanyol.

    The Argentine earned his first win as a manager in a derby at the Camp Nou in 2009. “Espanyol were bottom and Barcelona were top,” he recalled. “All the people were saying Espanyol were dead and had no chance. It was a special victory and an unbelievable memory.”

    NAMPA/AFP

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    Mbidi remains mum about Fifa visitMbidi remains mum about Fifa visitNFA president hopes for the best Fifa's latest mission to Namibia is expected to finally sort out the mess that Namibian football finds itself in. Under-fire Namibia Football Association president Frans Mbidi says he will not speak about the upcoming Fifa visit but hopes everything will be sorted out for the sake of football.

    The dismissed president acknowledges that football has suffered because of personal clashes between administrators.

    “It is hard to say something at the moment because it can be used against you, but I am just happy that things might probably settle when the world governing body comes.

    “It has been a very difficult year for Namibian football but the country has still managed to pick up results.

    “The league has continued and other football projects are still going on, which is something positive,” Mbidi says.

    Fifa has announced that it intends to send a delegation to Namibia on 19 December to sort out the squabbles in Namibian football.

    The chaos started in 2016 when Mbidi suspended NFA secretary-general Barry Rukoro for alleged insubordination.

    Rukoro, who has been in his post for over a decade, has survived the chop on several occasions and was reinstated, given his strong influence over the NFA executive committee.

    Mbidi, on the other hand, wanted to make his presence felt and to fix things he believed were not being done correctly at the association when he became president in 2014.

    Many people, including Mbidi, feel that Rukoro has overstayed his welcome and that he should make space for someone else.

    Rukoro, who knows he has a strong hold on the NFA executive, vowed to take Mbidi out before relinquishing his position.

    The SG felt that Mbidi wanted to breach the NFA constitution by standing for another term.

    Rukoro further accused Mbidi of tarnishing his name and the name of the NFA in front of Fifa, Cosafa and CAF officials.

    This year, attempts to oust Mbidi began after he attempted to remove Rukoro once again.

    In February, Mbidi announced that the football association would not renew Rukoro's contract.

    Mbidi cited article 38 (d) (3) of the NFA constitution, which reads: “Only the president may propose the appointment or dismissal of the secretary-general.”

    This resulted in the majority of the NFA executive committee challenging Mbidi's decision.

    The executive disputed his move by citing article (35) (i) of the NFA constitution, which says that “the executive committee shall appoint or dismiss the secretary-general”.

    In April, the NFA emergency committee, consisting of the first and second vice-presidents, resolved to keep Rukoro in office despite his term having expired.

    The SG had argued that leaving the NFA in the hands of Mbidi would not be in the best interests of local football.

    JESSE JACKSON KAURAISA

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    Jets cruise to 7-1 win over FlyersJets cruise to 7-1 win over Flyers Connor Hellebuyck made 36 saves, and Mark Scheifele collected three assists in the second period as the Winnipeg Jets cruised to a 7-1 victory over the visiting Philadelphia Flyers on Sunday afternoon.

    Hellebuyck became the fourth goaltender to reach 13 wins and did his best work during a scoreless game in the opening minutes. Hellebuyck made 10 saves before Winnipeg scored and 16 overall in the opening 20 minutes.

    Kyle Connor and Josh Morrissey scored in a span of 2:57 in the first period after Philadelphia registered 10 of the game's first 11 shots.

    The Jets took a one-goal lead into the second and broke it open with three goals in a span of 8:28.

    After Jakub Voracek scored on a rebound late in the first, Scheifele recorded secondary assists on Brandon Tanev's fifth goal 7:31 into the second and Dustin Byfuglien's power-play tally seven minutes later.

    After Byfuglien scored his first goal in 17 games, Scheifele assisted on Blake Wheeler's shorthanded goal on a breakaway.

    Wheeler scored after the puck hopped over Philadelphia defenseman Shayne Gostisbehere's stick near the blue line by centre ice.

    Bryan Little and Tyler Myers added third-period goals as the Jets scored seven goals for the second time this season and third time in franchise history against Philadelphia (also 2011 and 2003).

    Winnipeg star Patrik Laine did not score a goal for the season-high fifth straight game but contributed two assists.

    Scheifele recorded his fifth three-point game of the season and 29th career game with at least three points as the Jets won for the fourth time in five games and bounced back from Friday's 1-0 loss to St Louis.

    The Flyers gave up the first two goals of the game for the 11th time and dropped to 1-10 when doing so. Their only comeback from a 2-0 deficit this season was Saturday's 6-2 win at Buffalo.

    Philadelphia also allowed seven goals for the second time this season.

    Michal Neuvirth allowed three goals on ten shots before exiting as the Flyers dropped to 3-6-2 in their last 11 games. Anthony Stolarz allowed four goals on 25 shots.

    NAMPA/REUTERS

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Strong Bucks edge Raptors
  • Strong Bucks edge RaptorsStrong Bucks edge RaptorsBattle of top Eastern teams thrills The Raptors still own the best record in the league at 21-7, but they suffered a second straight defeat after falling 106-105 to the Brooklyn Nets on Friday. The Milwaukee Bucks bounced back from a disappointing defeat with a big win in Toronto on Sunday, edging the Raptors 104-99 in a battle of the NBA's top Eastern Conference teams.

    Malcolm Brogdon's back-to-back three-pointers with 1:07 remaining first tied the score then put the Bucks up 100-97, a lead they wouldn't relinquish.

    Brogdon scored 18 points. Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 19 and matched his season-high with 19 rebounds for Milwaukee, who fell to the two-time defending champion Golden State Warriors on Friday.

    Brook Lopez also scored 19 for Milwaukee, who became the first team to beat the Raptors twice this season.

    “We came off a tough loss to the Warriors, we knew we needed this one going into this back-to-back,” Brogdon said.

    The Bucks, who improved to 17-8, host Cleveland on Monday. He said shaking off the loss to Golden State wasn't difficult.

    “We're a really good team this year,” he said. “We have a lot of confidence in ourselves. We're resilient. We've got a coach that has confidence in us every night win or lose.”

    Toronto have dropped two straight for the second time this season and have lost three of their last four.

    Serge Ibaka scored 22 points and Kawhi Leonard had 20 for the Raptors. But Kyle Lowry went scoreless for the first time this season, missing all five of his shots.

    He did produce seven assists, and Toronto coach Nick Nurse said the Raptors didn't play badly offensively.

    “We did a lot of things well enough to win the game, but we just didn't score,” said Nurse, who admitted to concern over missed shots at the rim and missed open looks from the perimeter.

    “That's more the question,” he said of solving those shooting woes. “Can we get a little confidence back, get a little pep in our step?”

    Jrue Holiday and Julius Randle combined for 65 points to lead the New Orleans Pelicans past the Detroit Pistons 116-108.

    Holiday and Randle rose to the occasion after star teammate Anthony Davis was hobbled by a sore hip after a clash with Detroit's Blake Griffin in the first quarter.

    Davis returned to the game in the third period but finished with just six points on two-of-seven shooting with nine rebounds, four assists and five blocks.

    “He was probably 50%,” Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry said. “But just having him out there - defensively I thought he did a great job for us.

    Holiday filled the void with 37 points, one shy of his career high. He tied a career-best with six three-pointers. He pulled down five rebounds, handed out five assists and came up with three steals.

    Randle added 28 points with six rebounds and five assists.

    “Everybody stepped up and played well when we needed them to,” Gentry said. “Obviously, Jrue did a fantastic job controlling the game.”

    Elsewhere, the San Antonio Spurs defeated the Utah Jazz 110-97, avenging a 34-point loss to the Jazz on December 4.

    DeMar DeRozan scored 26 points and Rudy Gay had 23 points and 15 rebounds as the Spurs put together two straight wins for the first time since they won four straight from October 27-November 3.

    The victory was the 1 210th of coach Gregg Popovich's career, moving him into a tie with Pat Riley for fourth place in NBA history.

    NAMPA/AFP

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Brokering peace for Syria
  • Brokering peace for SyriaBrokering peace for SyriaToo many different boots on the ground A political resolution is the most important step to stabilising Syria. Following eight years of civil war with more than 400 000 dead in Syria, the ninth round of Astana talks between Turkey, Russia, Iran and the Syrian government and opposition members have yielded tangible results in pushing for a political solution. Undertaking to hold the next meeting in February 2019, Russia, Iran, and Turkey said the meeting, which included representatives of the Syrian government and opposition, made great strides in realising a political solution for the country.

    In a joint statement, the countries said they “rejected all attempts to create new realities on the ground under the pretext of combating terrorism and expressed their determination to stand against separatist agendas aimed at undermining the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Syria.”

    Furthermore, they “underlined their firm conviction that there could be no military solution to the Syrian conflict and that the conflict could be resolved only through the Syrian-led and Syrian-owned, UN-facilitated political process in line with the UN Security Council resolution 2254.”

    Simply put, Syria is a mess and there are far too many boots from too many countries, official or otherwise, on the ground. Russia, thus far, has been very effective in creating some form of stability by getting rid of terror groups and insurgents and restoring order in a bid to create the correct atmosphere for political change, at the will of the Syrian people.

    It is chaos on the ground. Turkey is fighting the Kurds in Syria, Israel is bombing Lebanon, also in Syria, and the origin and pay-cheque master of the so-called White Helmets remains an open mystery.

    That the West has had an interest in Syria is an open secret. Declassified Central Intelligence Agency documents indicate that as far back as 1986, there was an interest in overthrowing the Syrian government by provoking sectarian tensions. The conclusion drawn is that American needs would be “best served by a Sunni government controlled by business-oriented moderates” and furthermore, that such “a government structure would precipitate a strong need to Western aid and investment”.

    The CIA continued by saying that while Sunni “dissidence” had been at a minimum since Assad's crackdown in the 1980s, “tensions lingered, keeping alive the potential for minor incidents to grow into major flare-ups of communal violence” and moreover, “excessive government force in response to these disturbances would serve to facilitate even larger protests by Sunni groups”.

    The events of 9/11 gave further impetus to Western military involvement in the Middle East and elsewhere. According to the former NATO Supreme Allied Commander General Wesley Clark, Donald Rumsfeld, the defence secretary of the United States in 2001, had a plan which was laid out in a memo. Clark told media that “this is a memo which describes how we are going to take out seven countries in five years, starting with Iraq, and then Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Iran”.

    The US is in a bit of a pickle now. Russian military intervention has all but downed Islamic militants and the US has no real reason to remain behind, save to assist its long-term ally Israel in maintaining control of the Golan Heights, or, fresh water.

    Russian intervention in Syria had one goal: Restoring order for the country's legitimate government to pave the way for a political resolution and elections that reflect the will of the people.

    There was another chemical attack, this time with chlorine shells, on 25 November in Aleppo. The scale of the injuries, anywhere between 70 and 107 civilians, indicates that terror groups in Syria have secured chemical weapons.

    According to Syrian expert Salah al Hashawati, the chemical attacks in Aleppo indicate the US intention of continuing to achieve its goals in Syria. Syria has an extremely advantageous geopolitical position, so Washington won't retreat so easily, he said.

    “The Americans want to make Syria a headache for Russia,” Salah al-Hashawati told Sputnik, “according to this scenario, the crisis there should be permanent, like an open wound”.

    Moreover, Tehran's role in stabilising Syria will add impetus to Western interests and may cause US allies to deploy their troops to Syria.

    In the meanwhile, Russia has been providing military, political and humanitarian support to Syria with the country receiving more than 80% of Russia's total humanitarian aid.

    Its total share of aid reached 84% of the total volume of Russian humanitarian aid, which in value terms amounts to US$19.6 million, just over twice that granted in 2016.

    The Kremlin says it will continue to broker a tangible and long-lasting solution to the Syrian crisis, working now on a political solution with conflict on the ground relatively under control.

    TASS

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    Lions knock off lowly CardinalsLions knock off lowly CardinalsStafford stars in big match Matthew Stafford completed 15 of 23 passes for 101 yards to lead the Lions to a 17-3 win at Arizona on Sunday in a matchup of two struggling teams. The Detroit Lions won the game on the field, but the Arizona Cardinals might have been the biggest winners off of it.

    The loss wasn't all bad for the Cardinals, however, at least when it comes to draft positioning.

    Arizona (3-10) shares the worst record in the NFL with the San Francisco 49ers and Oakland Raiders with three games to play as teams look ahead to 2019 and what assets they can get in next spring's draft.

    The game was the predictable struggle between two of the league's worst offensive teams.

    Arizona entered last in the league in scoring offense behind a patchwork offensive line, while the Lions were 23rd.

    After a scoreless first quarter, Detroit got on the board with 9:35 left in the second quarter, taking a 3-0 lead on a 47-yard field goal by Matt Prater.

    The score capped off a 13-play drive that took 7:56 off of the clock despite only spanning 55 yards.

    With 3:03 left in the third quarter, the Lions scored the first touchdown of the game, but it wasn't provided by the offense.

    Detroit cornerback Darius Slay picked off a pass from Arizona quarterback Josh Rosen and scampered 67 yards down the sideline for a touchdown that made it 10-0. It was the first interception return for a touchdown in Slay's career.

    Arizona finally got on the scoreboard with 8:14 left on a 22-yard field goal by Zane Gonzalez, which was the last play in a nine-play, 62-yard drive that took 5:17 off of the clock.

    But the Lions put the game away on their ensuing possession when they drove 75 yards in seven plays and took a 17-3 lead on a one-yard touchdown run by Zach Zenner with 4:05 remaining.

    Zenner rushed for 42 yards on seven carries during the drive.

    Rosen went 26 of 41 for 240 yards in defeat.

    NAMPA/REUTERS

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    Zlatan sticks with LA Galaxy, AC Milan 'evaluate' FabregasZlatan sticks with LA Galaxy, AC Milan 'evaluate' Fabregas Zlatan Ibrahimovic will not be leaving LA Galaxy to return to AC Milan, the Italian club's sporting director Leonardo said on Sunday, although they are studying the possibility of signing Chelsea midfielder Cesc Fabregas.

    “Ibrahimovic will not return to Milan,” Leonardo told Sky Sport Italia. “He gave his word to the LA Galaxy that he would renew his contract. We thought about his return and he thought about it too, but he's keeping his word and will remain in MLS.

    “He always said from the start that if the LA Galaxy satisfied his conditions, then he would remain. They are doing that and he will stay there.

    “It would have been a marvellous story and a strong signal, but it will not be possible.”

    Ibrahimovic played for AC Milan from 2010 to 2012, winning a Serie A title with the club, before moving to Paris Saint-Germain and then Manchester United. The 37-year-old joined LA Galaxy this season and has a contract through the 2019 season with the Major League Soccer side.

    He was recently named the league's Newcomer of the Year, defeating record England goalscorer Wayne Rooney among others for the award.

    Leonardo said Milan were “evaluating the conditions” to sign 31-year-old Spaniard Fabregas, a former Arsenal and Barcelona player.

    “Unfortunately, with the Financial Fair Play issue it has become a puzzle and a difficult one to work out.

    “The owners want to invest, but there are parameters to be respected.”

    Meanwhile, Brazilian midfielder Lucas Paqueta arrived in Milan on Sunday ahead of his 35-million-euro ($40.4 million) signing and will have his medical on Monday.

    “He'll be a reinforcement, is young and can certainly give us a hand,” added Leonardo of the 21-year-old Flamengo player.

    NAMPA /AFP

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    Kizzire and Harman win golf QBE ShootoutKizzire and Harman win golf QBE Shootout Patton Kizzire and Brian Harman eagled the par-five 17th on Sunday to seize victory in the QBE Shootout in Naples, Florida, ahead of Graeme McDowell and Emiliano Grillo.

    Harman and Kizzire were one behind McDowell and Grillo when they arrived at Tiburon Golf Club's 17th in the fourball final round of the unofficial team event founded by Greg Norman.

    Both hit iron shots close and when Kizzire holed his eagle putt they leapfrogged McDowell and Grillo, who had pulled one ahead with their seventh straight birdie at 17.

    “We knew we needed at least birdie and eagle was a bonus,” Kizzire said.

    “He had a great iron shot in there close and freed me up, and I hit a good one, too. We both had looks at it. I putted first and made it.”

    Kizzire and Harman carded an 11-under final round of 61 for a 30-under total of 186.

    McDowell and Grillo had a total of 10 birdies - three on the front nine before their streak of seven from the 11th through the 17th - in a 10-under 62 for 187.

    It was McDowell's second straight runner-up finish in the event, after finishing tied for second with partner Shane Lowry last year.

    NAMPA/AFP

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    Oontamanana pokati kehangano lyaNamib Mills naBokomoOontamanana pokati kehangano lyaNamib Mills naBokomoNamib Mills a fala Bokomo kompangu Ehangano lyokulonga omausila lyoNamib Mills olya hala Ompangu yoPombanda opo yi indike ehangano natango lyokulonga omausila lyedhina Bokomo kali landithile we uusila walyo yokuteleka uukuki moombaapila dha fa ndhoka tadhi longithwa kehangano lyoNamib Mills lyoshilimbo shawo shoBakpro. Mondukumende dhawo dhompangu, menindjela gwomalanditho moNamib Mills, Pieter van Niekerk, okwa popi kutya kashi li mondjila pamulandu gwomathigathano mongeshefa Bokomo Namibia a longithe oombaapila dhokupakela uusila wokuteleka uukuki dha fa ndhoka tadhi longithwa kehangano lyawo.

    Okwa popi kutya Bokomo ota longitha owina oombaapila dha fa dhawo opo naye a likole sha okuza kelanditho lyuusila mboka okupitila komapepe goNamib Mills.

    Gumwe gwomaaniipambuliko aanene mehangano lyoBokomo, ehangano lyaSouth Afrika lyoPioneer Foods, okwa hololwa lya mono iiyemo yi li poobiliyona 10 momvula yo 2017.

    Okwa lombwele ompangu kutya Namib Mills ehangano enene moNamibia tali landitha omausila ga yooloka, omakoloni, olwishi oshowo osuuka.

    “Ohali landitha iilongomwa mbyoka kohi yoshilimbo shedhina Bakpro. Oshilimbo shoka osha longa okutameka omvula yo 1982, nomutholomeno gwoombaapila moka hamu landithilwa iilandomwa mbyoka otagu dhana onkandangala onene.”

    Omunambelewa ngoka okwa popi kutya oshilimbo shawo oshiikalekwelwa nomathano ngoka taga adhika kombanda yoombaapila dhuusila wawo oshowo omalwaala.

    Okwa popi kutya konima nkene ya tula momalanditho uusila mboka wu li moombaapila ndhoka ehangano lyaBokomo inali kala we tali landitha nawa.

    Sha landula sho ya tula momalanditho uusila mboka wuli moombaapila oompe muJanuari gwonuumvo, oya landitha ootona 42 dhuusila mboka nokuya muAguste oya landitha ootona dhi li po880.

    Aaniilonga yoNamib Mills oya popi kutya omolwa onkalo ndjoka, Bokomo okwa li a dhiminikwa opo a landithe po omausila ge ngoka ge li pokuninga nayi kondando yi li pevi noonkondo.

    Okwa popi kutya ehangano lyawo olya longitha woo omwaalu omunene gwiimaliwa mokuninga omapekaapeko gopangeshefa opo ya vule okutula momalanditho uusila mbyoka, ta popi kutya oya longitha oshimaliwa shi li poomiliyona 1.7 lwaampoka.

    Van Niekerk okwa popi kutya Bokomo okwa tokola owina okuholela ehangano lyawo ngele tashi ya koombaapila moka mwa pakelwa uusila mboka, ta popi kutya shoka oshili oshiningilawina molwaashoka iilandithomwa yawo yilwe oyi li moombapila dha yooloka noonkondo kwaadhoka tadhi adhika iilandithomwa yehangano lyaNamib Mills.

    Okwa popi kutya ota pula Bokomo opo a pataneke oomapopyo ge nokugandja omaumbangi nkene eshi enditha melundululo lyoombaapila moka ta landithile ngashiingeyi uusila we mboka wuukuki dha faathana naadhoka tadhi landithilwa uusila mboka kehangano lyoNamib Mills.

    Okwa tsikile kutya opo Bokomo a tule uusila we mboka moombaapila dha fa dhawo ote shi ningi opo a vule okulikola iiyemo melanditho lyuusila mboka tawu ithanwa 'vetkoek flour' nenge a ngwangwaneke aalandi nenge ayihe.

    Sho a yamukula komapopyo gaVan Niekerk, Hubertus Hamm, Omunambelewa Omukuluntuwiliki gwoBokomo Namibia, okwa popi kombinga yokwaaha endelelitha eindilo ndoka lyompangu, ta popi kutya Namib Mills oye ta etitha ekateko ndyoka.

    Hamm natango okwa popi kutya, osha kutha uule woomwedhi mbali Namib Mills opo a ngongepo oondokumende dhe dhoka dheindilo lyompangu a ningi ihe ope na ethano kutya ngoka ta pataneke eindilo ndyoka ita pumbwa okupewa ethimbo lya gwana opo iilongekidhe nomayamukulo ge.

    Epwaakeno lyeindio ndyoka olya undulilwa komasiku 13 gaFebruali omvula twa taalela.

    Tobias Louw gwoTheunissen, Louw and Partners okwa kalelepo ehangano lyoNamib Mills omanga Daneale Beukes gwoEngling, Stritter and Partners a kalelepo Bokomo Namibia.

    YANNA SMITH

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Racing down Leicester
  • Racing down LeicesterRacing down LeicesterSaracens cruise in Champions Cup Saracens joined France's Racing in making it three wins from three with an astonishing second-half revival to thrash Cardiff Blues 51-25. Racing 92 took a big step towards the Champions Cup quarter-finals with a 36-26 win over Leicester Tigers on Sunday, while two-time winners Munster hammered French champions Castres.

    Racing claimed a bonus point within 35 minutes as international backs Virimi Vakatawa, Juan Imhoff and Simon Zebo crossed as well as inexperienced back-rower Baptiste Chouzenoux.

    Scotland fly-half Finn Russell was instrumental as his side played an expansive brand of rugby which produced a fifth and final try to secure victory ten minutes from time.

    France prop Eddy Ben Arous left the field on a stretcher with a neck injury and went to a nearby hospital for further assessments.

    Coach Laurent Travers was impressed by his team's ability with ball in hand but expected more from his side.

    “Our attack was very good so we're not going to be fussy but we left three tries out there,” he said.

    “Sometimes we have to be more clear in our thinking to know when to play and when to keep it tight,” he added.

    Tigers left the French capital with their own bonus point, which pleased coach Geordan Murphy.

    “Tough place to come and always good to get a bonus point on the road. Disappointed we couldn't get more from the game but you'll take a point,” the former Ireland winger said.

    Racing top Pool 4 with 14 points from a possible 15 and are in a strong position to qualify for the quarter-finals, while Tigers are eight behind and need to gain their revenge at Welford Road next Sunday to hold any hope of a last eight spot.

    At Thomond Park, two JJ Hanrahan penalties was all Munster had to show from the first half but they stepped up a gear in the second half of a 30-5 rout with tries from Rory Scannell, CJ Stander and Hanrahan.

    Muster lead Pool Two with 11 points, three more than Gloucester.

    Another former two-time champion, Saracens, survived an early scare from Welsh side Cardiff Blues in north London.

    Tries from Blaine Scully and Matthew Morgan gave the Welsh side a deserved 18-13 lead at the break.

    Saracens hit back in the second half with Ben Earls crossing twice to put them ahead.

    Sean Maitland also scored two tries and there were touchdowns for Ben Spencer and Christian Judge as Saracens added 38 points in the second half, picking up a bonus point in the process.

    They top Pool Three with three wins from three.

    NAMPA/AFP

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Swimmers win silver
  • Swimmers win silverSwimmers win silver Namibia won a silver medal yesterday morning at the African Union Sports Council (AUSC) Region Five Under-20 Youth Games in Gaborone, Botswana.

    The swimmers, Heleni Stergiadis, Tiana Esslinger, Ju-Ane Oberholzer and Zune Weber won the silver medal in the 4x100 metre freestyle relay, with South Africa, who dominated the swimming events since Saturday, finishing first while Zimbabwe came third.

    Namibia now has two medals at the competition.

    Their first medal at the competition came on Saturday from Juan Johnson, who won a bronze in the 91+ kilogramme men's judo event.

    Swimming coach Daniel Louw says it has been a tough competition but he is happy that his athletes made it to the finals in most of their events.

    “We don't have a lot of swimmers at the competition and this is making it difficult for our athletes as they have no time to rest before going for another event. I am glad to see that most of our athletes made it to the finals that we will be swimming later in the afternoon,” he said.

    Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe are also taking part in the AUSC Region Five U20 Youth Games, which end on 16 December.

    The Namibian team is competing in football (men and women), track and field, boxing, netball, swimming, basketball, judo, volleyball (men and women) and tennis.

    NAMPA

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    The gearbox that shaped a new generation The gearbox that shaped a new generation VW celebrates 15 years of their famed transmission More economical and sporty than any automatic gearbox before, the DSG changed the way gears are shifted. Volkswagen - “To date, more than 26 million drivers of a Volkswagen and the Group models have opted for a dual-clutch gearbox.” NEWSPRESS



    Exactly 15 years ago, Volkswagen introduced the first dual-clutch gearbox (DSG) for large-scale production, an automatic transmission for the modern age.

    More economical and sporty than any automatic gearbox before, the DSG changed the way gears are shifted, particularly in the compact class.

    People want to drive automatic

    Gears were almost always shifted manually before the DSG came along in 2003 and shifted gears faster than any driver could manage manually.

    “To date, more than 26 million drivers of a Volkswagen and the Group models have opted for a dual-clutch gearbox,” Volkswagen previously stated.

    The USA and Europe were two separate gearbox worlds until a few years ago. Automatic transmission has always been preferred in North America. At the turn of the millennium, 88% of all motorists there opted for an automatic transmission.

    Western Europe, which is dominated by compact vehicles, presented a completely different picture in 2000: Here, only 14% of cars – predominantly premium models – had automatic transmission.

    Economy and performance

    And this was not only due to the higher price of automatic transmission: A manual gearbox was usually more economical and sporty.

    And so more than 90% of Golfs - the most successful of all Volkswagen cars - came off the production line with a manual transmission. The triumph of the automatic transmission was introduced in 2003 by the Golf R32 with 177kW.

    As the first Volkswagen, it was on sale with an optional six-speed DSG. This new type of automatic gearbox shifted extremely athletically and was up to 20% more economical than the automatic gearbox with hydraulic torque converter. And that changed everything.

    In 2018, the DSG installation rate for the Golf is over 40%. It is even almost 30% for the smaller Polo. The Golf Sportsvan has an installation rate of 50%.

    The DSG figures for the T-Roc and Tiguan have settled at a similarly high level. For the large Tiguan Allspace, the DSG installation rate is even around 90%.

    In the Passat, the average is between 60% and 70%. The Arteon constantly breaks the 80% mark.

    Depending on the model, engine and type of drive, today Volkswagen offers various 6-speed and 7-speed DSGs. They are currently designed for torques up to 250, 400, 420 and 550Nm.

    In addition, there is a 6-speed hybrid DSG as a module with an integrated electric motor for plug-in hybrid models such as the Golf GTE1 and Passat GTE2.

    The gearboxes are constantly being further developed. A coasting function, where the DSG decouples the engine from the drive train in order to use the kinetic energy of the vehicle and thus further reduce fuel consumption, is becoming increasingly standard.

    All dual-clutch gearboxes are united by an extraordinarily good shifting performance without tractive effort interruption. The shifting process takes place within a few hundredths of a second.

    During cruising, the DSG shifts up a gear very early – this saves fuel. It is also a fact that the dual clutch gearboxes are a perfect match for the hybrid systems of tomorrow. This is another reason why the future belongs to the DSG.

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Fuel smuggling grows
  • Fuel smuggling growsFuel smuggling growsImpact on local jobs, businesses disastrous Not only is illegal fuel damaging to vehicles, its impact on the local economy is worrisome with legal service stations in Oshikango already closing down. The smuggling of fuel from Angola does not only raise concerns about the illegality and the quality of the product, the impact on local, legal businesses is of great concern. In fact, several businesses in Oshikango have had to shut doors due to this practice.

    The mines and energy ministry launched an information campaign from 3 to 6 December in the north of Namibia to create awareness amongst consumers about the illegal importation and sales of Angolan fuel in Namibia.

    The deputy mines and energy minister, Kornelia Shilunga, delivered several speeches at Oshakati and in the broader Omusati Region saying it is illegal for unlicensed individuals to trade in petroleum products and furthermore, to bring these products into Namibia without customs' approval.

    The evasion of tax and fuel levies is also a great concern, she added.

    “The smuggling of fuel from Angola harms local, registered traders who now have to compete with the high volume of illegal, cheaper fuel. Moreover, our investigations have shown that this fuel is stored in illegal and unsafe containers which does not only pose a risk to the environment but is also a health risk to those dealing with the product.”



    Quality

    Shilunga added that there are serious challenges with the quality of the illegal fuel.

    “Our Namibian vehicles can travel for a short while on Angolan fuel but, the sulphur content is so high that it does not meet our local specifications and standards. Not only is it damaging to the engine of the vehicle, its emissions are unacceptably high,” she said.

    The use of this illegal fuel is worrisome for the environment, especially in light of the fact that Namibia is a signatory to several international conventions against pollution and carbon emissions.

    “Furthermore, SADC has set a target that all its member countries will move towards a lower suphur content and 'cleaner' fuel by 2030.”

    In terms of this goal, Shilunga says Namibia has taken steps to phase out 93 petrol while 50 ppm diesel has already been introduced. By the end of the year, the phasing out of 500 ppm diesel will begin and the introduction of 10ppm diesel will also take place.

    “We are working hard to ensure that we, together with the world, are moving towards cleaner fuel.”



    Identifying illegal fuel

    Shilunga said she is often asked what is wrong with Angolan fuel and furthermore, how the average Joe can differentiate between legal and illegal fuel.

    “There is nothing wrong with Angolan fuel, as long as it is used within Angola's borders. Every country has its own regulations and laws and Angolan fuel does not meet our required specifications. This is why it cannot be sold, in its current form, within Namibia's borders.”

    She said it is easy to identify illegal fuel by the way it is sold.

    “It is not sold at fully-fledged service stations … it is sold behind closed doors and in small, dangerous and unsafe cannisters.

    “If this matter is not tackled, it can potentially destroy legal petrol stations, causing more job losses and chaos in these difficult economic times.”

    Several service stations at Oshikango have either experienced losses or have closed and illegal fuel traders can now be found as far as Engela, Ongenga, Eenhana, Outapi and even Oshakati.



    ELVIRA HATTINGH

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Company news in brief
  • Company news in briefCompany news in brief Eskom: Plan to restructure debt due in 2019

    South Africa's government is discussing restructuring the debt of ailing power utility Eskom but will only give details of what it plans to do next year, public enterprises minister Pravin Gordhan said.

    The cash-strapped firm said last week it wants the government to take on R100 billion of its debts, about a quarter of its total borrowings. It is also eyeing a steep hike in tariffs in 2019 from the energy regulator.

    "That's an issue that is being discussed in government and sometime in the new year government as a whole will give you some idea of where we are going," Gordhan told reporters referring to the firm's debt of over R400 billion.

    The idea of moving Eskom's debt on to government's balance sheet has unnerved investors as it puts even more pressure on South Africa's sovereign credit ratings, already rated subinvestment by two of the top three agencies.

    Gordhan said there was "no possibility of haircuts on Eskom debt”. – Nampa/Reuters

    Shell reviews deals involving ex-executive

    Royal Dutch Shell has concluded that a Nigerian oilfield sale where it suspects an executive took bribes was not linked to a separate court case in which he and Shell face corruption charges over a US$1.1 billion offshore acquisition.

    The Anglo-Dutch company filed a criminal complaint in March against Peter Robinson, a former vice president for Sub-Saharan Africa, saying he took bribes in the US$390 million sale of onshore Oil Mining Lease (OML) 42 to a Nigerian firm.

    Robinson is also one of several former Shell employees involved in a trial in Milan, in which Shell and Italy's Eni are accused of corruption related to the US$1.1 billion purchase of a giant Nigerian offshore field, Oil Prospecting Licence (OPL) 245. Both the OML 42 and OPL 245 deals were signed in 2011.

    Shell, the largest foreign investor in Nigeria, said that it had completed an internal review of the OML 42 sale process and other deals Robinson was involved in, and it concluded his only violation was related to OML 42.

    Shell, Eni and Robinson deny any wrongdoing in the OPL 245 case. Robinson also denies any wrongdoing in the OML 42 sale. – Nampa/Reuters

    Juventus shares to be added to FTSE-Mib

    Italian soccer champions Juventus, challenging for an eighth consecutive title with superstar Cristiano Ronaldo onboard, will be included in the benchmark FTSE-Mib stock index later this month, the Milan stock exchange said.

    Rumours about the move pushed Serie A champions Juventus up by around 10% on Wednesday before the bourse announcement was made in the late evening.

    The stock will be included in the index, which groups 40 top shares in all, from December 27, it said.

    Juventus first listed in December 2001 and remained little traded until the arrival of Ronaldo from Real Madrid for this season.

    The shares were around 0.64 euro mid-year and jumped as high as 1.80 in September only to fall back. – Nampa/AFP

    Deutsche Bank hit by new laundering report

    Deutsche Bank defended its record in fighting money laundering on Thursday after the Financial Times reported it had processed 31 billion euro (US$35 billion) more in questionable funds for Danske Bank than previously thought.

    A Deutsche Bank spokesman declined to comment on the FT article. He said, however, that it was not Deutsche's responsibility to vet Danske Bank's customers and that business ties with the Danish bank had been cut in 2015.

    The sum came on top of US$150 billion Deutsche cleared for Danske's Estonian branch from 2007-15, meaning it handled four-fifths of the flows from the Danish bank's clients in Russia and the former Soviet Union, the FT reported, citing people familiar with the matter.

    "We have continuously intensified our efforts over the past years against money laundering and tax evasion," Deutsche's chief financial o fficer, James von Moltke, said in a statement.

    The bank is also under investigation in a separate German case linked to the so-called Panama Papers, a trove of documents from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca that was leaked to the media in April 2016. – Nampa/Reuters

    Oil margin put pressure on Trafigura's annual profits

    Global commodity trader Trafigura Group reported its lowest annual net profit in eight years on Monday as a drop in oil trading margins offset a strong performance by its metals and minerals division.

    Traded volumes at its metals division increased by 37% in the financial year that ended on Sept. 30, mainly in coal, which had a "surprisingly strong" year, the company said.

    Trafigura's total earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) for the financial year rose 8% to US$1.7 billion, from 1.6 billion. Gross profit increased to US$2.4 billion, from US$2.2 billion a year earlier.

    Net profit fell slightly to US$873 million from a lacklustre US$887 million in 2017 due to low oil volatility, already its lowest since 2010.

    Revenues rose to US$180.7 billion, from US$136.7 billion in its 2017 financial year. – Nampa/Reuters

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: More villages get toilets
  • More villages get toiletsMore villages get toiletsRemains a challenge in rural Namibia Access to sanitation is elusive for many in Namibia but a new programme has helped four villages solve this problem. Although two northern villages were declared open-defecation-free (ODF) this week, an estimated 1.15 million Namibians, or half the population, still don't have access to proper toilets.

    Lack of safe sanitation, water and hygiene can be deadly, especially to children. About half of the deaths of Namibian children under five years old are attributed to preventable diseases caused by poor hygiene.

    This was part of the message delivered by Anna Shiweda, deputy minister of agriculture, at an event celebrating the ODF status of Eenyama and Okakango Konduda villages in the Eenhana constituency of the Ohangwena Region.

    At Eenyama, 33 households consisting of 270 people now have access to proper toilets. At Okakango Konduda the same goes for 26 households consisting of 268 people. Another village, Ondilinawa, achieved ODF status earlier this year.

    Ondingwanyama village was declared free of open defecation last year.

    Shiweda said another consequence of poor sanitation, hygiene and water supply is the fact that 24% of Namibian children under five are stunted.

    “Namibia faces a sanitation challenge,” Shiweda said, pointing out that an estimated 76% of rural people relieve themselves in the veld.

    Open defecation varies between different regions, she said, with 35% of rural Hardap residents and 80% of Ohangwena residents living without access to toilets.

    In urban areas, open defecation is estimated at 20%, mostly in informal settlements.

    The villages that have attained ODF status did so by means of the Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach, a behaviour change approach recommended in the National Sanitation Strategy of 2008 which was first introduced to Namibia in 2014.

    The programme is being rolled out by the agriculture ministry and its implementing partners - the United Nations Children's Fund (Unicef) and the Namibia Red Cross Society (NRCS).

    It is also supported by the health and urban and rural development ministries and the Ohangwena regional council.

    Through CLTS, communities are empowered to conduct their own sanitation appraisal, make their own conclusions and take action, such as building toilets by using locally available materials and other resources.

    In August, Namibian Sun reported that according to a State of Hygiene in Southern Africa report, only 15% of Namibians have access to a basic latrine, while 3% have limited access to shared toilets and 7% live in unimproved hygienic conditions.

    It said 75% of residents still practised open defecation, contrary to the 50% number cited this week by the deputy minister.

    JANA-MARI SMITH

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    NTF consults on broiler protectionNTF consults on broiler protection The chicken industry in Namibia has major room for growth when one considers that Namibians consume 13 kg of chicken per year while in South Africans eat 38 kg per person per year.

    Currently, the monthly requirement for chicken is roughly 2 500 tonnes and of this, 1 900 tonnes are locally produced, the bulk of which is from Namib Poultry Industries which was established in 2012. Last year, South Africa produced 1.726 billion tonnes of chicken which implies that the Namibian market represents a meagre 2% of that of South Africa.

    These figures were announced by Robert McGregor, an economist of Cirrus Capital, at a workshop held last week by the Namibia Trade Forum (NTF) and other relevant stakeholders.

    The workshop was held with the view of preparing a white paper for the sustainable protection of the local broiler industry.

    “Namibia's consumption of chicken is far lower than that of South Africa which means there is a lot of room for the market to grow,” McGregor said.

    In 2017, the poultry industry contributed roughly N$201 million to the economy, 0.12% of the gross domestic product (GDP).

    If the multiplier effect is taken into account, which includes labour, packaging, transport, utilities and other costs, the total stands at 4.42 which means for each dollar spent on raising the chickens, N$4.42 is pushed into the economy. This increases the industry's contribution to the GDP to 0.7%.

    NPI currently employs 660 of which the majority is blue-collar labour. Moreover, according to McGregor, the costs of production in Namibia are far higher than that of South Africa.

    However, uncertainty over policy is preventing further growth in the industry.

    “Nobody wants to create a monopoly but, measures are required to protect the local industry against dumping,” he said.

    In 2013, import quotas were imposed limiting imports of chicken to 900 tonnes in a bid to protect the local industry. Following this, the South African Poultry Association launched a bid in the High Court to have the import limitations set aside. The application failed but, the South Africans were given permission to appeal and the matter is currently bogged down.

    The uncertainty of this outcome is currently the greatest limiting factor to the development of the local industry.



    Ronelle Rademeyer

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    Fuzile takes IBF Intercontinental titleFuzile takes IBF Intercontinental title South Africa's Azinga Fuzile produced another outstanding performance as he threw a flurry of punches to win the vacant IBF Intercontinental junior-lightweight title when Tanzanian Ibrahim Class quit at the end of round six at the Orient Theatre in East London on Sunday.

    Fuzile has had an outstanding 2018, winning all four fights inside the distance against Immanuel Andeleki (KO 1), Waidi Uman (TKO 8), Malcolm Klassen (TKO 4) and now Class.

    Fuzile was in control from the opening bell but the dreadlocked Class showed courage as he tried to counter the classy South African who scored with stinging right and left southpaw shots to the head and body.

    Class was sent down with a big left hand in the sixth round, but he beat the count and held to the bell as Fuzile punished him with rights and lefts to the end of the round, and it was a completely beaten fighter whose corner decided not to let him come out for the seventh round.

    Fuzile improves his record 13-0; 8 and Class's reported record dropped to 22-5; 10.

    Fuzile is ranked at No. 10 by the IBO and Class at No.38, with the South African listed at No. 9 by the IBF and at No 17 by the WBC.

    In the main supporting bout the South African minimum weight champion, southpaw Xolisa Magusha, retained his title on a majority points decision over Siphamandla Baleni.

    The scores were 116-113 and 115-113 for Magusha and Baleni 116-114.

    Other results: Luyanda Ntwanambi, won pts 10, Adam Mbega (WBO Youth flyweight title); Junior featherweight: Ayabonga Sonjica , won tko 5, Luthando Mbumbulwana.

    NAMPA /ANA

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    Former Man Utd star Park offers to quit Korea youth roleFormer Man Utd star Park offers to quit Korea youth role Former Manchester United star midfielder Park Ji-sung has offered to step down from his youth administrative role at South Korea's football association, officials said yesterday.

    Park, who also played for Dutch giants PSV Eindhoven, was the biggest name to emerge from South Korean football before Tottenham striker Son Heung-min.

    The 37-year-old has pursued a career in football administration since retiring from playing in 2014, and became head of the Korea Football Association's youth strategy department last year.

    But he has submitted his resignation, an official told AFP, adding that the offer was being considered.

    The exact reason for Park's decision was unclear, but he currently lives in England and the official said that he may have been feeling uneasy about the distance from his duties.

    “He wasn't working full time so he faced limitations,” the KFA official said.

    The official added the resignation may also be aimed at creating a bigger role for Michael Muller, a veteran German expert scouted by Park this year as the KFA's chief instructor and youth policy director.

    South Korean football has failed to build on the national side's run to the World Cup semi-finals in 2002 in which Park played a key role.

    At the time of Park's appointment in November 2017, he vowed to develop South Korea's youth football using his abundant experience in Europe.

    NAMPA/AFP

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    Robisch and Looser make a dashRobisch and Looser make a dashElectrifying cycle race sets Namibia alight The usual suspects dominated the solo categories in the Nedbank Desert Dash. Rebecca Robisch; German cyclist - “This was the hardest race ever for me due to the strong headwind that prevailed in the beginning.” Swiss rider Konny Looser (29) once again crossed the finish line of the 14th edition of the Nedbank Desert Dash first for a fourth consecutive time.

    Rebecca Robisch (30) from Germany clinched the women's solo title of the gruelling 373km mountain-bike race from Windhoek to Swakopmund for a third consecutive time.

    Looser, who finished in a time of 14 hours and 22 minutes, said the third stage of the race was the toughest for him.

    “Winning is nice but being on the bike was no fun at all. During the first half we raced against a strong wind and I suffered from stomach cramps. I had to fight. A win is a win and I am happy that I could achieve my goal.

    “I had to be very careful not to over-pace and stayed with the Godwana team to save energy. I am lucky that it worked for me in the end.”

    He added that the mood and vibe of the race served as motivation for him.

    “Riding past Kupferberg is quite spectacular with all the fans watching and cheering the riders on. The whole race is simply great.”

    Asked if he would do the Desert Dash again next year, Looser said he was unsure.

    Robisch, who finished the race in 17 hours and 17 minutes, said she wanted to give up at one stage but her mother insisted that she continue. A turning point for her was the fact that she caught up with Irene Steyn, who was leading the race in the first half.

    “This was the hardest race ever for me due to the strong headwind that prevailed in the beginning. I struggled a lot during the first half of the race and thought of giving up. My mom told me to keep going to the next stage. I started feeling better and drafted with the men to preserve some energy for the end.”

    Robish complimented the organisers on presenting a spectacular race with a familiar feel.

    “I enjoy returning to Namibia and this particular Desert Dash taught me not to give up and never to stop. I however think that I won't do another Desert Dash.”

    Drikus Coetzee, who set the pace from the start and was caught by Looser during the second stage, finished as runner-up in the men's solo category in a time of 14 hours and 56 minutes. Jacques Tattersall was third.

    Irene Steyn finished second in the women's solo category with Ciska van der Byl following in third place.

    The first four-man team to cross the finish line was Gondwana Masters - Piet Swiegers, Rob Sim, Nico Pfitzenmaier and Corrie Muller - in a time of 14 hours and 22 minutes.

    They surprised everybody by outpacing the favoured Nedbank Private Wealth team consisting of Tjipe Murangi, Herbert Peters, Alex Miller and Vianney Links, who finished fourth.

    Hollard finished in second position and Megatech Mannies Bike Mecca in third.

    R&R Importers won the four-member mixed team category followed by Indongo Toyota in second and Team Hollard third. The two-man team event was won by Team Hollard followed by NCCS and team Cycles4U.

    The winning two-woman team was Swakopmund Guesthouse, followed by Paratus.

    Husband and wife Christiaan and Silke Bean of Team Beauty and the Bean won the two-member mixed team event. Team FNB, consisting of Marion Schonecke and Ananias Tamati, finished second. Dalie Maritz and Willie Junius of team Pari Passu came third.

    Carmen Johannes, Jenny Phal, Nicola Fester and Heide Hobohm of team Speedy Sloths clinched the four-woman team category.

    Team Epieq Women, consisting of Lelane van Wyk, Lindie Loock, Charmine Grobler and Mayvonne Swart, finished as runners-up. Swart (16), a learner at Pro Ed Academy, was the youngest rider to complete this year's Desert Dash.

    More than 1 000 riders from 14 different countries participated in the world's longest single-stage mountain-bike race.

    Completing the Dash is an illustrious achievement all cyclists want tick off their list, commented Gernot de Klerk, the head of marketing and communications at Nedbank.

    “The Desert Dash is not only a physical challenge but also a mental endurance challenge. There is no easy or quick way to conquer the Dash, and the time in the saddle before the race, as cyclists say, is what makes all the difference. After all the hard work, the rush of tackling the treacherous route is an experience that stays with you forever.”

    As usual, an electrifying atmosphere prevailed at the starting line at the Grove Mall in Windhoek on Friday at 15:00. Family, friends and cycling enthusiasts welcomed home the weary, but supremely satisfied and proud cyclists at the finish line at Swakopmund's Platz am Meer mall on Saturday.

    Organiser Mannie Heymans expressed satisfaction with the event and said the new finish line at the mall was warranted due to space constraints at Tiger Reef.

    Four solo riders, Uwe Diekmann, Gerhard Gulewitz, Patrick Muppertz and Christoph Meier, participated in the Desert Dash to raise funds for the Pro Namibian Children's home. The home caters to 120 orphans and vulnerable children, and is based at Omomas Farm. The riders managed to raise N$750 000 for the home.

    Solo cyclist Ettienne Soekoe took on the challenge to raise funds for the Insimbi Legacy Projects, a non-profit company raising funds to protect the white rhino. The funds raised are to assist the anti-poaching team in the Bosveld, Speranza and Messina areas in South Africa. The daily protection cost to protect Bosveld, Speranza and Messina is R261. For 365 days the cost is R95 286.

    The Old Dogs for Wild Dogs, a four-person grandmaster men's team, took on the 373-kilometre challenge to raise funds for the Cheetah Conservation Fund. The team includes Len le Roux, one of the founders of the Desert Dash in 2005, Vincent Shaw, Andreas Brückner and Ecki Fyer. The fund aims to reduce human-wildlife conflict in the Otjozondjupa and Omaheke regions.

    LEANDREA LOUW

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    World food prices fall to lowest in more than 2 yearsWorld food prices fall to lowest in more than 2 yearsOil at 12-year dip Dairy prices dropped 3.3% from October to last month, for a sixth straight monthly decline, and meat prices slipped slightly. World food prices declined in November to their lowest level in more than two years, led by declines in vegetable oils, dairy and cereal, the United Nations food agency said.

    The Food and Agriculture Organisation's (FAO) food price index, which measures monthly changes for a basket of cereals, oilseeds, dairy products, meat and sugar, averaged 160.8 points last month, down from a revised 162.9 in October, and its lowest level since May 2016.

    The UN body's Cereal Price Index averaged almost 164 points in November, down 1.1% from October. Vegetable oil prices fell for a 10th consecutive month, by 7.6% on the month and reaching a 12-year low.

    Cereal prices fell partly because new crops weighed on rice export quotations and export competition drove down maize, FAO said.

    Palm oil prices fell considerably "fuelled by both persisting large inventories in leading exporting countries and the recent contraction in global mineral oil prices," it said.

    Soy and sunflower oil prices weakened due to "abundant supplies across the US, the EU and several emerging markets and positive production prospects in the Black Sea region."

    Dairy

    Dairy prices dropped 3.3% from October, for a sixth straight monthly decline, and meat prices slipped slightly.

    FAO said global cereals output in 2018/19 was seen at 2.595 billion tonnes, down marginally from the previous forecast and 2.4% below last year's record high production.

    FAO's forecast for world wheat production in 2018/19 was 725.1 million tonnes, 2.8 million tonnes lower than the previous forecast, "reflecting reduced estimates for this year's harvests in Turkey and the Russian Federation," FAO said.

    FAO's forecast for world cereal stocks at the close of seasons in 2019 was 762 million tonnes, unchanged from November. – Nampa/Reuters

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Kind Mbaeva gives back
  • Kind Mbaeva gives backKind Mbaeva gives backKeeper respects elders For Maximilian Mbaeva, giving is not a problem because he remembers were he came from. Brave Warriors and Golden Arrows goalkeeper Maximilian Mbaeva has supported the Gobabis community by donating N$10 000 to the Epako old-age home.

    The former Desert Rollers player says he felt the need to help the elderly and those in need.

    “I seriously do not even want to be thanked for this because what I did was just out of my own will.

    “It is important to support where you come from because love is the most important thing.

    “I see people being successful but never looking back at their former homes and that is one of the most painful things to me,” Mbaeva says.

    He was a regular starter for Golden Arrows in the South African premiership for almost two seasons, until he suffered a concussion towards the end of the 2016/17 season.

    Mbaeva made his debut for Arrows in August 2014 and went on to make over 80 appearances for the club.

    The 29-year-old goalkeeper's highest number of appearances for Arrows was during the 2014/15 season, when he played 30 matches in league and cup competitions.

    Mbaeva has lost his first place in the Namibian national team to Kaizer Chiefs goalkeeper Virgil Vries.

    “I am still determined to help more people out of generosity because you never know who you will need in the future.

    “The most important thing is I am still happy at the club where I play and I consider myself lucky because of how I treat my elders.”

    STAFF REPORTER

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    Kanalelo leaves Unam for MaritzburgKanalelo leaves Unam for Maritzburg University of Namibia (Unam) Football Club head coach and Brave Warriors assistant coach Ronny Kanalelo has resigned from his club to pursue a coaching career in the South African Premier Soccer League (PSL) with Maritzburg United.

    Speaking to Nampa on Thursday, the former national team captain and goalkeeper said he was offered a job in the Maritzburg team and he took the offer.

    “I will know my role in the technical team by tomorrow. The club knows my capabilities and they also know how passionate I am about coaching. I am looking forward to this new challenge. I know the coach as we worked together before, so I know what to expect,” Kanalelo said.

    He added that he will be available for the Brave Warriors until the expiry of head coach Ricardo Mannetti's contract in the middle of next year, from where he will consider his position as assistant coach.

    Unam Football Club board chairperson Frednard Gideon confirmed to Nampa that they had received Kanalelo's resignation letter.

    “We discussed the issue with the coach and we had no choice but to accept his resignation. Assistant coach James Britz will be in charge until January, from where we will make a new appointment. As a club we wish Kanalelo all the best,” said Gideon.

    He added that they will look at local coaches first before casting their net wider.

    Kanalelo leaves Unam in the relegation zone on position 13 of the 16-member log with one win, one draw and one defeat, giving them four points.

    Maritzburg United are currently being coached by Fadluraghman Davids, who is assisted by Mahier Davids and Siya Mdluli.

    The team is currently sitting in position 12 in the PSL.

    They will play Black Leopards on 12 December at home before travelling to Supersport United in Pretoria.

    They will finish off this year's programme with a home match against Baroka before breaking for the festive season.

    NAMPA

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Nghiwete fights back
  • Nghiwete fights backNghiwete fights backClaims victimisation The suspended NSFAF CEO says the board is not properly appointed. Suspended CEO of the Namibia Students Financial Assistance Fund (NSFAF), Hilya Nghiwete, has filed an application with the High Court in which she claims that the NSFAF board was not properly appointed and has no authority to institute disciplinary steps against her.

    Nghiwete says the board's appointment, composition and constitution was done in terms of the NSFAF Amendment Act of 2014, which is yet to come into force and is therefore invalid.

    Higher education minister, Dr Itah Kandjii-Murangi, in January announced the appointment of the new board chaired by Jerome Mutumba for a one-year term in terms of the NSFAF Amendment Act of 2014.

    However, when Kandjii-Murangi realised that this legislation is not yet in force, board members were issued with new appointment letters - this time for a three-year term – in terms of the NSFAF Act of 2000, read together with the Public Enterprises Governance Act of 2015.

    Nghiwete was then also appointed as an ex-officio member on the board.



    Victimisation

    Nghiwete, in her founding application, claimed to have been subjected to continuous victimisation by the previous and current NSFAF board of directors on “spurious and unfounded allegations”, saying there seems to be a determined effort to unfairly and unlawfully terminate her employment at NSFAF.

    Nghiwete said as soon as the new board commenced its term, it became clear that it wanted to get rid of her and “without hesitation victimised” her.

    This victimisation, she said, particularly came from Mutumba, who among others, made “disparaging and defamatory allegations” against her on NBC's One-on-One television programme without her having been given an opportunity to be heard.

    Kandjii-Murangi in her answering affidavit said she is not aware of any ulterior motive by the current board to get rid of Nghiwete.

    Acting CEO of NSFAF, Kennedy Kandume in court papers filed on behalf of the fund, denied the claims of victimisation, saying the board is trying to resolve allegations of maladministration and misconduct levelled against Nghiwete.

    He said if the board had preferred not to deal with these matters, there is the potential of eroded public trust and dissatisfaction. He also said the former board at no stage took any action to unfairly and unlawfully terminate Nghiwete's contract.

    Kandume further stated that Nghiwete knew all along that the NSFAF Amendment Act had not yet come into force because she – as the CEO of the fund – had at all times operated as if the Amendment Act had come into operation.



    Disciplinary action

    Nghiwete was suspended on 14 April pending the institution of a disciplinary hearing. She registered her objection at receiving the charges formulated against her later than the requisite 14 days.

    She received an electronic unsigned version of the charges on 30 April after it was communicated to her that a forensic investigation of the charges by KPMG would take longer than two weeks.

    A disciplinary hearing was convened for 7 May, but Nghiwete requested an adjournment to secure legal representation.

    She was again served with additional charges on 20 September, and the disciplinary hearing was scheduled for 3 October.

    Despite Nghiwete's argument that the board was illegally appointed and therefore cannot suspend or press charges against her, the chairperson of the disciplinary hearing, Clement Daniels, directed on 9 October that the hearing must proceed.

    Nghiwete said this decision is “unsound and bad in law” for a number of reasons.

    The disciplinary process is stayed until the finalisation of her High Court application.





    CATHERINE SASMAN

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    Swapo reinstates recalled councillorsSwapo reinstates recalled councillors The Swapo Party has resolved to reinstate all six Oshakati town councillors who were recalled last month for not following instructions from the party headquarters.

    The party's Oshana regional coordinator, Samuel Nelongo, said yesterday that the decision was taken on Thursday during an extraordinary regional executive committee meeting.

    The recommendation was then forwarded to the Swapo secretary-general and was endorsed by her on Friday.

    The councillors were recalled because they had defied a directive by secretary-general Sophia Shaningwa regarding the election of office-bearers.

    Their reinstatement was on the condition that they stick to the directive.

    Shaningwa's directive was that Gabriel Kamwanka, who had served as chairperson of the Oshakati town council management committee for seven years, was to be replaced by Onesmus Shilunga, who recently rejoined the council.

    Instead, former mayor Katrina Shimbulu was chosen as the new chairperson instead.

    This resulted in Shaningwa recalling the six councillors.

    “The reinstatement comes with a condition that the councillors adhere to the directive,” Nelongo said.

    This means that Shilunga will serve as the chairperson of the management committee, with Shimbulu and Loise Shivolo as additional members.

    Angelus Iyambo will retain his position as mayor of Oshakati, deputised by Ndamonghenda Hamunyela. Kamwanka and Popular Democratic Movement (PDM) representative Linus Tobias will serve as ordinary council members.

    KENYA KAMBOWE

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    The joy and love in Christmas carols The joy and love in Christmas carols Justicia Shipena

    Some people dislike December because they hate hearing Christmas music everywhere they go, or because standing in those long lines to purchase your favourite snack is unbearable. I don’t think I am one of those people. Christmas music is one of the few things that bridges the gap between different genres and brings many people together.

    There are the classics, the ones that our parents and grandparents grew up with, singing along to. Nat King Cole’s rendition of Silent Night, Bing Crosby and David Bowie singing Little Drummer Boy and Barenaked Ladies’ God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen, are all near the top of my ideal Christmas playlist.

    Then there are the pop carols by NSYNC which is a boy band that broke up in 2002 but their carols such as Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays still continue to bring up cheer to many. Other pop carols include Justin Bieber’s Mistletoe, Band Aid’s oddly racist Do They Know It’s Christmas.

    Most are forgettable. But one of these newer attempts is, in fact, a near perfect Christmas song. Mariah Carey’s All I Want For Christmas Is You is that song which was released 24 years ago and it’s pretty trendy to complain about this song, so I think it’s necessary to defend its honour this and every holiday season.

    Other declarations of love are more subtle, quiet and safe, but Mariah doesn’t want subtle or quiet or safe. In her song All I Want For Christmas Is You, the love Mariah feels is bursting at the seams and there’s nothing she can do but belt a high A about it.

    There’s something liberating about how happy this song is. Mariah’s affections may be unrequited, but she’s not going to let that stop her. Her earnest devotion is probably part of the reason why people think they don’t like it. Her openness and unabashed emotion make them uncomfortable in a culture where we are supposed to hide our feelings all the time. Mariah’s not hiding anything.

    So here is the truth during the Christmas season, no one wants to be alone. Christmas, more than any other holiday, including Valentine’s Day, is about love. From a theological perspective, it’s John 3:16: “God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son that who so believeth in him should not perish but have eternal life.” That’s the greatest love of all.

    However secularly, gifts are bought, cards are exchanged and families and friends gather round all because of love and we come together to remember what’s really important: each other and the love we share.

    Yes, this is a little schmaltzy, but Christmas is the one time of the year when it’s okay to be schmaltzy. Have you seen Love Actually? The theme of that movie is that love actually is all around, but it’s especially all around at Christmas. That’s a theme I can get behind.

    But when you’re surrounded by so much schmaltz and the love is not present, it’s a little less merry and bright. This brings me back to Mariah’s song. I had a conversation with mid-20s woman and she told me that almost every Christmas, she has earnestly sung along because her words resonate. She does not care about the gifts she receives but she just wants love for her own, more than the other person could ever know. All she wants for Christmas is you.

    If this column was part of one of the vignettes in Love Actually, this paragraph would identify who that “you” is, but that’s sort of irrelevant at the moment. The magic of the song is that everyone has a “you”. After all, if the song only resonated with a few people, it wouldn’t be so popular. But many singers have recorded their own, inferior versions because it speaks to all of us.

    Maybe it’s someone you have a crush on, maybe it’s your long-distance girlfriend or maybe it’s your family who you won’t see on Christmas Day. It might be a little needy or selfish, but we all just want love for Christmas. Mariah’s right… no amount of gifts could ever change this human desire.

    In general, I think the many different cultures in Namibia place too strong of an emphasis on romantic love as the most important or only relationship we can have, and that we don’t value our platonic bonds enough. So I don’t mean to suggest that the platonic friendships I will celebrate all month long aren’t as important as a hypothetical relationship with a hypothetical boyfriend.

    After all, my favourite plot in Love Actually is about the friendship between an aging rock star and his manager. The love I have for my family and friends is important and life-sustaining and wonderful. But sometimes, when the mistletoe comes out, and the couples cuddle and I’m left with visions of unrequited love dancing in my head, it’s good to know Mariah’s got my back with the song I’ll be singing in the shower all month long.

    I end by saying, we are all hyped by what we can do and enjoy in the holiday hence I urge you all to do it responsibly. Remember to sing along and happy festive season!

    justicia@myzone.com.na

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Africa Briefs
  • Africa BriefsAfrica Briefs Fitch keeps SA's rating unchanged

    Ratings firm Fitch on Thursday kept South Africa sub-investment grade credit rating steady at subinvestment and maintained its stable outlook, but warned that low growth and the rising debt of state-owned firms posed a risk.

    Africa's most industrialised economy has barely grown in the past decade with fiscal missteps and government corruption contributing to weak business and consumer confidence.

    Fitch rates both Pretoria's foreign and local currency debt at 'BB+', one notch below investment grade.

    "South Africa's ratings are weighed down by low growth potential, sizeable government debt and contingent liabilities," Fitch said in a statement.

    Of the top three ratings firms only Moody's has the country's sovereign rating in investment grade. – Nampa/Reuters

    Deadly ranch invasion shows land-use conflicts in Kenya

    Renewed invasions of private ranches by herders in Kenya's northern Laikipia region a year after similar invasions led to deadly conflicts is a sign of cracks in the country's land use system, experts said.

    A herder was shot dead when police tried to confiscate his cattle after they invaded one of the ranches last week, police and ranchers said.

    Increased droughts due to climate change, as well as population growth and the enclosure of public lands, have pushed many traditional nomads to move onto grazing land on private ranches.

    "This is really putting pressure on normal pastoralists in terms of where they are going to access pasture and water," said Nyangori Ohenjo, programme manager at Centre for Minority Rights Development.

    The conflict in Laikipia highlights the struggle for land between indigenous communities and conservationists across the world, Ohenjo said, and is partly a legacy of Kenya's colonial past. – Nampa/Reuters

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    Clash of the keyboard warriorsClash of the keyboard warriorsNamLAN brings together best electronic gamers Not every sport is about kicking or hitting a ball - some prefer more sedentary pursuits such as computer games. For the eleventh year in a row, the Namibian Electronic Sports Association (NESA) hosted its annual LAN event at the Unam gym hall last week.

    Namibian gamers competed for cash prizes totalling N$30 000.

    The games included FIFA18 and Tekken 7 on PlayStation4, and League of Legends and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive on PC.

    NESA thanked the sponsors - KIA Motors, Monster Energy, Rocomamas, BDO, Radio Energy 100FM, Future CC, MikelJes Music Productions and Link Media - for being part of the initiative.

    “Without their contributions, NamLAN would not be possible. NESA would also like to thank all the volunteers who assisted in making sure that the event ran as smoothly as possible,” the organisers said.



    The winners were:

    FIFA 18

    • Mapenzi Chimana

    • Eugene Morkal

    • Tristan Meyer

    Tekken7

    • Freddy Mazila

    • Flip de Bruyn

    • Shosho Chiinda

    League of Legends

    • Braai Time Gaming

    • Poro Squad

    • RayODT

    Counter Strike: Global Offensive

    • EZK 25:17

    • Braai Time Gaming

    • RayODT

    Assetto Corsa

    • Louis van der Merwe (with a lap time of 01:43:556)

    • Edan Farmer (with a lap time of 01:46:954)

    • David Beukes (with a lap time of 01:46:556)

    Best overall placements for clans

    • Braai Time Gaming

    • EZK 25:17 & RayODT

    • Poro Squad

    Best overall placements for players

    • Jonathan Calitz

    • Flip de Bruyn

    •Tristan Meyer, Freddy Mazila, David Adams, Andries Steyn, Henry Page

    JESSE JACKSON KAURAISA

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: My top picks for 2018
  • My top picks for 2018My top picks for 2018 I was struggling to pick my best columns of the year because they all made an impact but I had to choose just two to remind my lovely readers of what my 2018 has been like. I was struggling to pick my top columns of the year because they all made an impact but I had to choose just two to remind my readers what my 2018 has been like.



    Let's avoid a football disaster

    I am worried about the stampedes that have been occurring at the Sam Nujoma Stadium whenever the national football team plays a big match.

    I am writing this with the tragedy that happened in South Africa in 2013 in mind, where 43 people were crushed to death during a stampede at a game between Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates at Ellis Park Stadium.

    I have observed that many times whenever the Sam Nujoma Stadium is packed to capacity, officials often end up opening the entry gates because people start pressing towards the entry points in large numbers, which creates havoc.

    Just about a week ago when Namibia played Zambia in the Africa Cup of Nations qualifiers, the same thing happened even though the gates were not damaged this time around.

    In 2016, the same thing happened, where people damaged one of the gates after forcing themselves into the stadium during a Cosafa Cup match against Botswana.

    The gates later had to be opened and people who had not bought tickets entered for free.

    Now that was a loss for the NFA which could have made more money from gate takings.

    This kind of pushing and shoving can lead to a disaster and leaves people afraid to go the stadium.

    Some parents want to take their children to watch the national team's games, but they fear that their children could end up trapped in a stampede.

    I understand that MTC recently held a music show at the stadium that was packed to capacity but there was no stampede, unlike at football matches.

    It was said that MTC used more entry points and that made it easy for people to enter the stadium.

    At football matches, only two entry points are used.

    The other problem is caused by football fans who buy tickets just minutes before kickoff.

    Others arrive just before kickoff, which creates long queues at the entry points.

    These habits could result in injury and death because a large number of people force their way into the stadium at the last moment.

    My advice is that the NFA must use all possible entry points to the stadium, especially when Namibia is playing important matches.

    More security guards must be deployed to control spectators who push towards the entry points.



    Education is important for sport stars

    Many sports personalities suffer hardship after they end their careers because they do not have the necessary education to find other jobs.

    We have seen so many sports personalities whose lives have been shattered after retiring even if they had lived a lavish life before.

    It is sad that most of these individuals end up looking as if they never had anything at all.

    The most important cause of all this is because these sports personalities never invested in education.

    It becomes hard for them to find a job because they do not have the necessary qualifications required for a specific job.

    Back in the day at several schools, a person needed a high grading in his/her subjects in order to be part of the school sport team.

    This was a practice which ensured that those who had a passion for sport had to work harder academically in order to be part of the team.

    It is a practice I hope returns in several schools in order to help the talented sports people progress in their studies.

    The benefits of sport are far beyond the impact on physical well-being and the value of the educational benefits of sport should not be underestimated.

    I must also note that it is worrisome that most of these people that fail to have a proper life after their sport careers end are those that played football.

    I have observed that our premier league clubs turn a blind eye to helping their players in terms of advising them to get a proper education.

    That is why we see most of our footballers on the streets after ending their sport careers.

    We also can't shy away from the fact that there is a huge gap between the educational standards of most rugby players compared to football players.

    If one has to take a look at most of the players playing rugby at the moment, we can see that many of them are either studying or have a decent job.

    A different story can however be told about most of our footballers because they only focus on playing football and settling for a sub-standard life.

    I know there are those that would say they do not have the funds in order to pursue their academics.

    However, I must say that there are those that can afford to study, but they still prefer to stay away from academic-related activities.

    One cannot also just say that not all football players are shying away from studying.

    Romario Ndjavera, Ronald Ketjijere and Brian Bantam are a few examples of the footballers who focused on their studies while playing the beautiful game.

    These guys are very talented in football, but they saw that they had to invest into education because they will not play the beautiful game forever.



    jesse@namibiansun.com

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    Suitable for the Namibian contextSuitable for the Namibian context We were pleased to see that the justice minister, Sacky Shangala, has held consultations with regards to sales in execution of homes. He met with stakeholders in the industry on Thursday of last week. Of late, there have been several media reports of homes being taken from their owners, in most cases those most vulnerable, due to unpaid municipal accounts or bond instalments overdue.

    According to Shangala, the matter of educating the public on their responsibilities for home loans is very important. However, one of his suggestions is that banks develop some sort of system where, if a bond holder loses his or her job, a 'payment holiday' can kick in.

    Shangala suggested six months where the bank expects no instalments and the homeowner has some time to either secure new employment or, can put the home on the market.

    According to the Bank of Namibia's regulations, commercial banks have the responsibility to litigate if a bond has not received payment after 90 days. On the 91st day, the bank must litigate.

    While we agree that it is ultimately up to the homeowner to contact the bank should they not be able to make payments, Namibia has special circumstances where bond holders may not understand the gravity of not making any payments.

    Banks are not in the business of owning houses but as the system stands, they can auction that property off and if the outstanding loan is not settled by that sale, they simply move again after the homeowner to fully settle the loan.

    The banks have more protection than the people. A payment holiday would be a great window of relief for many in this country.

    Namibians are struggling to get by in these trying times and home ownership is often the result of years of battling to qualify for a loan and then pay it off. To provide some relief, especially to those most vulnerable would, in our view, be very suitable for Namibian conditions.

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Nam remains in junk grip
  • Nam remains in junk gripNam remains in junk gripMoody’s keeps negative outlook Moody’s estimates that, in the absence of shocks, government’s fiscal consolidation path is achievable. Renewed and persistent downward pressure on the South African rand, and the Namibian dollar which is pegged to it, would raise the burden of US dollar-denominated debt which Moody's currently estimates to be around 11.4% of GDP as of 2017. – Moody’s Moody’s on Friday keep Namibia’s credit rating at junk and maintained its negative outlook for the sovereign.

    “The negative outlook reflects Namibia's persistent vulnerability to a range of shocks that would weigh on revenue, increase financing costs and, as a result, weaken fiscal strength and raise liquidity and external vulnerability risks,” Moody’s said.

    It added that the affirmation of the Ba1 rating reflects Namibia's gradually improving medium-term growth prospects and moderate wealth levels that support the economy's shock absorption capacity.

    Moody’s estimates that, in the absence of shocks, government’s fiscal consolidation path is achievable. Government plans a gradual fiscal consolidation, with the deficit narrowing to 4.5% of gross domestic product (GDP) in the current fiscal year ending March 2019 and 4.0% for 2019/20, from 5.0% of GDP in 2017/18 and a peak at 8.3% in 2015/16.

    Combined with improving but still moderate nominal GDP growth, it would slow but not halt the increase in the debt burden, to around 46.7% of GDP in 2019/20 from 42% in 2017/18, Moody’s said.

    “At these levels, the debt burden is higher than the median level for Ba1-rated sovereigns (32.9% in 2017). A relatively broad revenue base and moderate overall cost of debt supports debt affordability.

    “Moody's estimates that interest payments absorbed around 8.9% of revenue in 2017, comparable to the median level of 9.3% for Ba1-rated sovereigns. However, consolidation at the projected pace would not quickly remove the sovereign's vulnerability to a range of potential negative developments that would weigh on revenue and/or raise financing costs,” the agency said.

    SACU

    Moody’s warned that “Namibia is and will, in the absence of faster consolidation, remain vulnerable to lower SACU revenue (about one third of total revenue) than currently assumed by the government and Moody's”.

    Related to SACU revenue, with about 20% of exports shipped to South Africa, Namibia's economic environment remains closely tied to that of its main trading partner, Moody’s said.

    “Moody's expects a gradual increase in GDP growth in South Africa but the significant challenges it faces in achieving sustained robust growth point to downside risks that would spill over and dampen Namibia's government revenue,” it said.

    Government revenue is also partly linked to commodity prices, Moody’s continued. “The royalties and income from the diamond sector and from other mineral ores provide a source of revenue for the government that is vulnerable to production or price shortfalls.”

    While the government plans several measures to improve revenue generation capacity and tax administration, including establishing a new revenue agency planned for 2019, the effectiveness of these measures in raising revenue in a stable growth and commodity price environment and in improving the resilience of revenue to weaker growth and prices developments is untested, according to the rating agency.

    It added that a large wage bill which accounts for around 50% of government expenditure constrains the government's capacity to cut spending and restore fiscal consolidation should revenue collection be lower than currently expected.

    Turbulence

    Namibia's fiscal outlook is vulnerable to a tightening in financing conditions, in particular external financing conditions, potentially resulting from turbulent global financial markets, Moody’s said.

    “Renewed and persistent downward pressure on the South African rand, and the Namibian dollar which is pegged to it, would raise the burden of US dollar-denominated debt which Moody's currently estimates to be around 11.4% of GDP as of 2017.

    “Should prospects of slower fiscal consolidation dent the confidence of domestic banks in macroeconomic stability, the cost of financing domestic debt, including a large stock of T-bills (11.6% of GDP in October, 2018) would rise and rapidly weaken debt affordability,” Moody’s said.

    Namibia also has a sub-investment rating at Fitch Ratings.

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Street kids want to zula
  • Street kids want to zulaStreet kids want to zulaMost street kids have homes A study on Windhoek street children shows that most of them have homes to return to but they enjoy living without adult supervision and earning money by illicit means. A Unam study has found that street children return to the streets where they engage in prostitution, mainly because they get used to being their own bosses and making their own money.

    The study found that the majority of Windhoek street children were born in Windhoek, with a few who hail from Zimbabwe and South Africa, while those from outside Windhoek are predominantly from Rehoboth and Keetmanshoop. There are a handful from Gobabis and Oshikango as well as Lüderitz and Swakopmund.

    The Demographic Profile of Street Children: A study of Windhoek, 2015, was commissioned by the gender equality and child welfare ministry to determine the socio-demographic characteristics of street children in Windhoek, as the population remains unknown.

    The study compiled by Unam social work students found that the majority of the street children are boys between the ages 11 and 18 who are able to return to a family home, and that the majority of them are Damara-speaking with the smallest number speaking Shona as home language.

    The study also found that the majority of these street children have only attended school to grade 8.

    The study also made two important distinctions, namely 'children on the streets', which refers to children who have homes to return to but are on the street to earn money, and 'children of the streets', which refers to homeless children who have no families. The former group is the majority.

    The study also showed that most of these children grew up with single mothers and grandparents.





    Those who grew up with other relatives or a stepparent are at risk of living on and off the streets.

    The study also indicated that the overwhelming majority of street children are boys (84%), and girls or young women at 16%.

    “The lesser reasons why the children are pushed onto the streets are hostile home environments such as alcohol abuse and divorce, as well as their own defiant behaviour such as the use of illicit drugs and non-adherence to a structured environment. Primarily, poverty drives these children to the streets,” the report states.

    It adds that a sense of belonging has considerable influence over street children's decision to stay on or off the streets.



    Means of income

    According to the study, street children's primary source income is begging and stealing (58%), followed by prostitution and selling illicit drugs.

    The majority of street children were born in the capital while some hail from southern Namibia and surrounding towns.

    The border and coastal towns of Namibia are prone to the presence of street children as the highest percentage outside Windhoek first lived on the streets in these towns, the study found.

    Street children also confirmed that they had been approached by drug dealers who wanted them to sell illicit drugs.



    The majority of the children are often rounded up by the police, their own parents or caregivers, ministry officials and staff from the government after-school centre.

    The study also found that while most of the street children indicated money in their pockets will keep them off the street, about half of them have no parents to return to who can support them financially.



    Recommendations

    The study recommended the development of targeted risk programmes for boys.

    It also recommended a strengthened monitoring and reporting system of foster placements beyond the superficial provision of basic needs by the social welfare sector to identify children at risk of maltreatment, defiant behaviour and assessing if caregivers still wish to foster or care for a child.

    The study also suggested that there is a need to strengthen the legal framework to identify child prostitution and to address the reasons why minors are taken and held at police stations.

    JEMIMA BEUKES

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    Hambukushu chief gets supportHambukushu chief gets support Supporters of Hambukushu chief Erwin Munika Mbambo believe that certain top government officials are behind a committee trying to overthrow the chief.

    This allegation was made on Saturday at Mukwe in the Kavango East Region, where hundreds of people came together to show their support for Chief Mbambo.

    Talking to Namibian Sun on the sidelines, some supporters claimed that the committee trying to overthrow the chief was not doing it in the interest of the tribe but to serve the interest of certain individuals in government who want easy access to land in the Hambukushu area.

    “It is no secret that in other parts of the country, access to land is a challenge and now they are targeting our land through this committee.





    “Unfortunately our chief is a straight talker and values the land he administers and that is a characteristic that others don't like. That is why they will only have their way if they remove him,” one supporter said.

    The committee chaired by Casius Mukenah last month held a referendum to determine whether Mbambo should remain the chief of the Hambukushu people.

    Mukenah said out of 2 931 votes only 222 voted in favour of Mbambo and, therefore, he should step down immediately.

    However at Saturday's meeting Mbambo's supporters said the referendum was illegal.

    They argue that the committee's claims that the chief is blocking development are baseless.

    They say it is the government's obligation to steer development and not that of the chief, as he does not receive a budget for developmental projects.

    “How is the chief blocking development? The chief is just against the sale of land like it is happening in other traditional authorities who receive N$20 000 one-off payments from those so-called investors who put up lodges and then make millions from our land,” another supporter said.

    “In fact people in other traditional authorities along the Okavango River who sold their land to investors today do not have access to the river anymore, which is something our chief does not support and now he is declared an enemy of the people.”

    Alfons Dikuua, a member of the Hambukushu Traditional Authority, explained how a chief can be replaced.

    That can only happen if a chief dies, or cannot fulfil his duties and appoints a capable person to rule on his behalf, Dikuua said.

    Another way in which a chief can be removed is if he is convicted of a serious crime. In such case, the royal family would get together and nominate a successor.

    “If the reigning chief passes on, he leaves a message which is vested with the elders within the royal family. The elders will then discuss the matter with the senior councillors, who announce the name of the incoming chief,” Dikuua explained.

    When asked why the traditional authority did not accept the committee's referendum, given that Mbambo had succeeded Alfons Majavero in the same way, Dikuua said the correct procedures were not followed.

    At Saturday's gathering Mbambo did not talk to his people. He merely observed how they danced and praised him for being a good chief.

    KENYA KAMBOWE

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  • 12/10/18--14:00: Stars aim to fight back
  • Stars aim to fight backStars aim to fight backA weekend of draws The weekend saw only two Namibia Premier League teams getting maximum points, with the other matches ended in a draw. African Stars coach Robert Nauseb has vowed to fix the team after a disappointing 5-1 defeat to Black Africa on Sunday.

    The Reds were humbled by their rivals who displayed some magical football throughout the match.

    “It was a difficult time for us but we will bounce back no matter what.

    “We have a very big game ahead of us and that is why we need to go back to the drawing board and fix everything.

    “I believe that the players we have are capable of picking themselves up,” Nauseb said.

    In other league action, Unam FC were held by Julinho Sporting at the Rundu Sport Stadium.

    Tura Magic dropped two points following a 1-1 draw against Life Fighters.

    Tigers FC were successful and beat Civics by a single goal.

    Okahandja United and Young African played to a 1-1 draw, while Eleven Arrows were held by Young Brazilians.

    Black Africa are leading the log with 13 points from five matches followed by Mighty Gunners on 12 points.

    Citizens FC also started the season well and are in third position with nine points.

    Newly promoted Young Brazilians have already shown glimpses of survival and are fourth in the premier league with eight points.

    Civics, Orlando Pirates and Okahandja United are rooted at the bottom of the table.

    The Civilians are yet to register a win during the 2018/19 Namibia Premier League season.

    Citizens boss David Goagoseb said he was happy with his team's performance so far.

    “We started the season off well and I just hope that we can continue like this throughout the entire season.

    “I believe that the spirit in the team is very high and I hope we can carry on the momentum.”

    JESSE JACKSON KAURAISA