Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Tells it All - Namibian Sun

older | 1 | .... | 825 | 826 | (Page 827) | 828 | 829 | .... | 912 | newer

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: Double book launch
  • Double book launchDouble book launchEmbracing the culture of reading On 24 August, it will be a good day for Namibian bookworms as two authors release their works to the public. Local authors Goodwill Domingues and Renatus Imalwa will be launching their books 'A Code Named Progress' and 'Kanime' on 24 August at the National Library of Namibia. Domingues, who has another book to his name The Philosophy of Progress, says writing has been a passion for him and says it comes easy. Having sold over 400 copies thus far, he believes there is a reading culture in Namibia and we need more authors.

    “The Namibians are waking up in terms of having a general reading culture although many still doubt the quality of local content. Those who dare to read however find out a much different story and their perceptions change,” said Domingues.

    The books are from two different worlds and they explore the interest of both fiction and non-fiction lovers. 'Kanime' is based on a little boy from the Uukwambi tribe of the Oshiwambo people who finds himself in hazing situations.

    “Kanime finds himself searching for a lost Oshiwambo tribe, but before he does he meets many enemies. The book covers the many aspects of the Oshiwambo people including mythical creatures and the story of the cattle raiders,” said Imalwa.

    'A Code Named Progress' by Domingues is non-fiction book that explores the many aspects of life regarding the human mind and ideas that keep people ever struggling to make major shifts in their experience of life. According to him, the book makes mind-grappling claims regarding the human condition and brings to the surface many sensitive areas of life.

    “My book has many stories surrounding reality and what it truly means to live a life filled with expectation and triumph. Julius David wrote the foreword. He is the founder Windhoek Group of Companies, so make sure to keep an eye out for it,” he said.

    The event is expected by packed with people from all walks of life with performances by ML Samuel Ngodji, Anna Shalihu and Luis Munana. Tickets for the double launch are priced at N$300 and are available for reservation at truthtonep@gmail.com which includes both books and dinner.

    June Shimuoshili

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: Hip-hop artist ProKid dies
  • Hip-hop artist ProKid diesHip-hop artist ProKid dies The family of hip-hop artist ProKid has confirmed that he died on Wednesday night after suffering a seizure.

    The family of 37-year-old artist whose real name is Linda Mkhize released a statement saying he was visiting friends when the seizure occurred. Paramedics could not revive him. Fans and colleagues in the music industry have taken to social media with tributes to the artist. Fellow hip-hop artist Proverb called ProKid a legend, while Tweezy said he was inspiration.

    ProKid's numerous albums, including the 2005 debut 'Heads and Tales', 'Dankie San' in 2007, and 'Snakes & Ladders' in 2009, earned him a numerous awards from the HYPE Awards and the Channel O Music Video Awards but he never managed to scoop a Sama.

    His family has asked for privacy and details on his memorial and funeral service will be announced in due course. ProKid is survived by his mother Fikile Mkhize, his father Zwelakhe Kheswa, his wife Ayanda, and his three-year-old daughter Nonkanyezi, his brothers, and extended family.

    Hip-hop artists including Slikour of Skwatta Kamp, JR and AKA, all paid tribute to the Number One Soweto Boy – as he usually referred to himself – saying that he had inspired their music journeys and had always remained humble.

    “There would be no charts to top, no deals to sign, no tours, no nothing without Linda Mkhize and what he did for this industry and that's the sh*t we got caught up in, too busy with our own nonsense to reach out to our own big brother and talk to him, sit with him. Appreciate him,” AKA tweeted.

    The National Freedom Party leader, Zanele KaMagwaza-Msibi, on Thursday described Mkhize as a rare breed and a trendsetter who was always dedicated to his craft and wanted to excel.

    “One of the important things we will always remember ProKid with is his clean life, dedication and courage to excel. He was a rare breed of musician who never forgot his roots and, more importantly, who never allowed his celebrity status to get better of him as he remained humble all the time,” Magwaza-Msibi said in a statement.

    NAMPA/ANA

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: Company news
  • Company newsCompany news Apple's mettle in India tested in squabble

    In India, the world’s second-biggest smartphone market, Apple Inc’s normally deft management of government relations is being put to a fresh high-stakes test.

    For almost two years, Apple has battled India’s telecom regulator over a demand that it allow the use of the government’s anti-spam app. Non-compliance, the watchdog threatened last month, could result in phones being “derecognised” from the country’s networks, meaning they would no longer function.

    It is just one of several headaches the Cupertino, California-based company is nursing in India - a market it calls a top priority but where it has just 1% share.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    Fox's formal bid opens final chapter of Sky battle with Comcast

    Twenty-First Century Fox Inc has triggered a 46 day deadline to raise its bid for Sky in a battle with Comcast CMCSA.L for control of the British pay-TV group.

    Under British takeover rules, Rupert Murdoch’s Fox now has until September 22 to trump Comcast’s 14.75 pound per share offer for Sky, which values the broadcaster 25.9 billion pounds (US$33 billion), after it formalized its own 14 pounds per share bid.

    Comcast gatecrashed Fox’s attempt to buy the 61% of Sky that it does not already own earlier this year and the US cable giant’s latest, higher offer, which it submitted in July, has been recommended to shareholders by the broadcaster’s independent directors.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    Appeal lost over Anheuser-SABMiller merger

    A federal appeals court on Wednesday rejected an antitrust challenge by 23 beer drinkers to Anheuser-Busch InBev SA’s US$107 billion purchase in 2016 of SABMiller Plc, which they claimed would thwart competition and raise prices in the US beer market.

    The 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals in Portland, Oregon said SABMiller’s agreement with antitrust regulators to divest its U.S. beer business, by selling its stake in the MillerCoors joint venture to Molson Coors Brewing Co, would prevent increased concentration in the industry.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    Boeing sees more delivery delays

    Boeing Co, the world’s largest planemaker, said on Wednesday it expects delivery delays of its hot-selling narrowbody aircraft to continue deeper into the year as it grapples with delays of fuselages and engines from suppliers.

    “You saw some of that making its way into 2Q deliveries a little bit, and you’ll see more of that in Q3 where we’ll expect to have deliveries lower than our production rate,” Boeing Chief Financial Officer Greg Smith told an analyst conference.

    “And so therefore you’ll see a much more heavily weighted Q4,” Smith added. “Those jobs are now in our factory and each one of those suppliers is getting more on track,” he said.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    Glencore posts record interim profit

    Glencore posted record interim profit and cut debt to below target, but left investors guessing about what it will do with all the extra cash.

    The world’s biggest commodity trader said it would continue to focus on cutting its debt and returning money to shareholders. However, it failed to increase its interim dividend or expand an existing buyback at a time when rivals are paying out more to investors. That may leave the door open for more deal-making by billionaire chief executive officer Ivan Glasenberg.

    -Fin24

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: The thing about blessers
  • The thing about blessersThe thing about blessersDangers, risks, poverty and greed all play a role The culture of 'blessers' and 'sugar daddies' is omnipresent, both here and elsewhere as bling, greed and poverty drive the practice. Recent research by reviews.org, focusing on trends on Google searches indicates that the highest search volume in South Africa are for 'sugar daddy' sites. The research was based on trends in 112 countries and looks at the most 'indulgent' sites searched for.

    This may be due to the current economics in the region and world at large and some say that most seem to be looking for relationships where there is monetary benefit.

    Namibia appears to be no different.

    While the terms 'blesser' and 'sugar daddy' are thrown around in slay queen conversations, concerns are raised about the health risks and the general dangers that come with what some refer to as 'glorified' prostitute behaviour.

    The image of the traditional sugar daddy has changed from middle-aged men wearing Omega sandals, half open shirts with a golden chain dancing on the top of their bulging kapundas, to sleek tenderpreneurs in either Louis Vuitton suits or designer tracksuits driving either a black G-wagon or the latest BMW SUV.

    Social commentator Ngamane Karuaihe-Upi, also known as Uncle G, in an interview with tjil said that we have damaged societies and this is caused by capitalism. He says society is teaching the youth to get what they want even if it means taking a short cut due to lack of social safety nets.

    “If Namibia is to become serious about changing the situation, we will have to have decent free education, healthcare and housing, because if we have all of that, what young person will sleep withan old man for the same things?” he questioned.

    A local 'blessee' or 'sugar baby' spoke to tjil on condition of anonymity. She said she has no choice because her parents are very poor and cannot pay her tuitione fees. Her loan application was also not approved she had to find a different way of breaking the poverty cycle.

    “I know it is scary and dangerous but the money is worth it. They make you do things and all you can do is cry yourself to sleep, but at least your tuition fees are paid. Many of them understand that I'm doing it for school so when I stress on safety, they go with it,” she said.





    The dominating perception is that poverty is driving the 'blesser' culture yet in many cases,this is not true. One girl, who identified herself as Queen, comes from a well-off family but her family's money is not enough for her.

    “I like looking and smelling good and being the centre of attention. These men want to give you money because you are beautiful, so why not take it? People know that I have blessers, it's an open secret but it's my business. I live in an apartment where I don't pay rent because they pay for me. Life is good for me, I do medical check-ups every two months and I'm on the pill. We use protection but only sometimes. They pay more when there is no protection.”

    Slay queens are identified as young ladies who drive expensive cars, live in certain apartment blocks and wear only imported clothing and shoes. This notion was however denied by Namibian socialites Maria Nepembe and Dillish Mathews who are usually on the controversial side of such habits.

    Many believe they are sugar babies.

    The two stars said that they have never received any financial assistance from men in exchange for money and that a woman at the end of the day, has the right to fall in love with whomever they want.

    “You can never do well and having your own thing going on without people assuming that there's a blesser behind it. It's always women, this women that. How do you know that women aren't the ones blessing men? We are all equipped to work hard and earn our own money,” said Nepembe.

    “Women shouldn't engage themselves in relationships that can turn out to be dangerous and unhealthy just for a little slayage, but you are entitled to love whom you want, it's your prerogative. Everyone is going through the economic crisis, it doesn't exempt men. Run your own race,” said Mathews.

    Human rights activist Rosa Namises expressed her empathy with girls that are in unloving, cold and exploitative conditions. She recalls sex work being something that was done secretly but now it is being practised at “bus stops in the neighbourhood” and in the open. Namises says this is young girls looking for love and they do this because nobody tells them what is right or wrong. She further said that these girls are at risk in terms of sex as not all of them have the power to demand protection or to even get their money.

    “Having girls that are in such relationships tells a story about our society. It means we have abandoned our children instead of guiding them and being there for them. Sleeping with sugar daddies is also sex work. I am hopeful and I'm doing the little I can but it is not enough and we all have a role to play. We need to go back to culture and see how things were done,” she said.

    June Shimuoshili

    0 0

    AB InBev to build new brewery in fast-growing MozambiqueAB InBev to build new brewery in fast-growing Mozambique Anheuser-Busch InBev, the world’s biggest brewer, will start building a more than 2 million hectolitre a year brewery in Mozambique in the second half of next year, the company’s Africa head said on Tuesday.

    The Mozambique investment will look to fend off competition from rival Heineken, which is the middle of building a US$100 million brewery in the southern African country.

    It will also help AB InBev keep pace with demand in a market that saw growth over more than 20 percent in the first half of this year, Ricardo Tadeu, the company’s Africa zone president told journalists in Johannesburg.

    “It’s a reflection of how much we have been adding on the continent, constantly aiming for growth and putting the money where our mouth is,” he said.

    Tadeu said the company was not ready to disclose the size of its investment in the new facility, but added that the land acquired for the project would allow for further expansion of brewing capacity in the future.

    AB InBev already brews the 2M and Laurentina brands in Mozambique in another brewery.

    Substantial gas reserves discovered off Mozambique’s Indian Ocean coastline more than a decade ago were expected to jumpstart its economy. But progress in setting up the infrastructure to tap them has been glacial, slowing the pace of investment in many sectors.

    AB InBev paid roughly US$100 billion to buy rival SABMiller in 2016, giving it a substantial presence on the continent of more than a billion people.

    It has operations in 15 markets mainly in southern and east Africa, but also Ghana and Nigeria in West Africa.

    It announced plans in March to invest US$100 million in a new 1 million hectolitre per year brewery in Tanzania, where beer volumes jumped by a fifth last year and its local unit Tanzania Breweries already runs four facilities.

    “We’re very excited about Africa because we have experience in Latin America and Asia. Some people look at Africa and see a lot of volatility, uncertainty. We see opportunity,” said AB InBev CEO Carlos Brito, who was visiting South Africa.

    “For us, Africa is definitely the place to be.”

    -Nampa/Reuters

    0 0

    Cape Town housing market continues to cool Cape Town housing market continues to cool Affordability imporoves Cape Town is in for a considerable period of slower house price growth "Sellers get an idea in their heads that house price growth is massive and then - often after price growth has dropped - they still have it in their heads that their property must be worth more."- John Loos, household and property sector strategist at FNB This until affordability has meaningfully improved, John Loos, household and property sector strategist at FNB, told Fin24 on Tuesday.

    In his view, the current trend of slowing house price growth in the Cape Town metro largely has largely been driven by some years of significant deterioration in housing affordability.

    The trend of slowing house price growth has now even spread to more affordable residential areas.

    At the same time, Loos says despite house price growth having slowed down, Cape Town is still the most expensive city in SA and will probably retain this position in the long term. This is despite Gauteng offering higher salaries, and due to Cape Town's geography creating a greater scarcity of land.

    "House price growth in Cape Town had to slow down. When a market gets as hot as the huge house price inflation a year or two ago, you will find a certain element of speculation, of people trying to make huge capital gains," Loos told Fin24.

    "Sellers get an idea in their heads that house price growth is massive and then - often after price growth has dropped - they still have it in their heads that their property must be worth more."

    In the second quarter of 2018, Cape Town’s estimated average house price growth rate was 8.7% year-on-year (y/y). This was the 8th consecutive quarter of a slowing house price growth rate from a 10-year revised high of 15.4% recorded in the 2nd quarter of 2016, according to the FNB 2nd quarter 2018 City of Cape Town Sub-Regional House Price Indices.

    Sub-regions

    Furthermore, 9 out of 12 sub regions in the metro have experienced slowing y/y house price growth in the second quarter of 2018.

    Loos told Fin24 that the only regions in the Cape Town metro that did not show slowing house price growth were the Helderberg region (Somerset West; Strand; Gordons Bay); the suburbs just east of the CBD (Woodstock; Salt River; Pinelands); and the Cape Flats.

    The most expensive sub-region - the Atlantic Seaboard - has seen average house price growth slow the most sharply off the highest base - from a revised multi-year high of 27.7% y/y in the final quarter of 2016 to 1.9% by the 2nd quarter of 2018. It now has the slowest price growth of all the regions in the metro.

    The City Bowl has gone from its revised multi-year y/y growth high of 23.9% in the 2nd quarter of 2016 to 9.7% by the 2nd quarter of 2018.

    The Southern Suburbs - also regarded as one of the three most expensive sub-regions in the city - saw further slowdown from 8.6% in the prior quarter to 7.4% in the 2nd quarter of 2018. This is after it reached a multi-year high of 15.9% in the 2nd quarter of 2015.

    The Western Seaboard sub-region (including Blouberg, Milnerton and Melkbosstrand) saw a slowing in y/y price growth - from 14.3% in the 3rd quarter of 2017 to 10.2% by the 2nd quarter of 2018.

    The sub-region around Bellville and Parow in the northern suburbs saw price growth slow from 11.9% y/y in the final quarter of 2017 to 11.2% in the 2nd quarter of 2018.

    The Durbanville-Kraaifontein-Brackenfell sub-region also started to slow slightly, from 10.1% growth in the 1st quarter of 2018 to 9.9% in the 2nd quarter.

    Loos believes the drought may have had some cooling impact on the Cape Town housing market, due to its negative impact on the Western Cape economy, but he does not see the recent rains in the Cape reversing the slowing down trend in the near-term.

    "My view has always been that, with or without the drought, house price growth in Cape Town would cool off. It is unrealistic to expect house prices to continue growing at the pace they did," Loos told Fin24.

    "It is about affordability. Ultimately house prices just become too expensive as it outgrows salaries and making even some 'aspirant migrants' think twice."

    The FNB Estate Agent Survey shows that first time home buyers have battled to enter Cape Town’s housing market in recent years. The level of first time buying in the region (8.57%) is already significantly lower than in other metros in the country.

    "This slowing may also be in part due to poor home affordability in Cape Town, with other major coastal regions in South Africa offering many more affordable alternatives for aspirant 'semi-grants' to the coast from inland regions such as Gauteng," said Loos.

    "We remain of the opinion that Cape Town’s house price growth will continue to slow in the near term and move into a lengthy 'benign' period in line with the broader SA housing market, while incomes in the region gradually catch up with prices."

    -Fin24

    0 0

    Tackling human-snake conflictTackling human-snake conflictWindhoekers urged to take part in online survey Snake catchers have over the past three years removed more than 500 snakes from suburbs and informal settlements in and around Windhoek Namibian snake experts are urging Windhoekers to take part in a quick online survey in which they describe any brushes with snakes, in order to find ways to address human-snake conflict.

    Francois Theart, who has long worked to bust myths around snakes and campaigns for their rescue and release, instead of killing, says while much has been done to investigate carnivore-human conflict, little has been done to address increasing human-snake conflict, especially in urban areas.

    “There is no management plan for snake conflict and we are trying to come up with a viable, proven and tested way on how to mitigate conflict between humans and snakes.”

    Theart said snake catchers have over the past three years removed more than 500 snakes from suburbs and informal settlements in and around Windhoek, indicating that encounters, and possible conflict, between humans and snakes, is high.

    In line with this, the snake research project at Nust has posted on easy to answer online survey consisting of 13 questions, titled 'Human-snake interactions in and around Windhoek'.

    The survey can be accessed on the Snakes of Namibia Facebook page, and consists of easy to answer questions that range from how often a snake has been seen, where and what a person's response was to the event.

    “What this will do is enable us do come up with an idea of what people's reactions are. Do they think of it as a negative encounter? Do they prefer to kill snakes or do they call out for help.”

    Of the responses collected so far, 51% of respondents said they called a snake catcher to remove the snake, 22% of respondents said they tried to kill the snake and 10% admitted they tried to catch it.

    Theart's advice is to leave the snake alone and call a catcher, if possible, while keeping a careful distance and an eye on the snake.

    Snakes form a vital part of a healthy and balanced ecosystem, feeding on pests such as rodents and reducing the risk of diseases spread by pest species.

    Snakes also form part of the diet of various other animal species. Theart warned that if they are killed at unsustainable levels, ecosystems will suffer.

    Snake venom is used to produce a variety of medicines, including pain, anti-clotting and heart medication.

    “Without these misunderstood animals we might never find a cure for cancer, HIV or Parkinson's disease,” he told Namibian Sun during a previous interview.

    JANA-MARI SMITH

    0 0

    Efundja access roads progressing wellEfundja access roads progressing well The Roads Authority's N$112-million flood mitigation project, which aims to build 25 new gravel access roads to 33 flood-prone schools and clinics in the Omusati and Ohangwena regions, is in full swing.

    The building of the roads and culverts has been subcontracted to Kettu Investment, Sash Trading, Moza Investment, Eponga and Tangeni and Odjove jv N'olune under the supervision of the RA and WML Consulting Engineers.

    The RA says it is satisfied with the quality of work done so far, eight months into the 15-month project.

    “The main objective of this project is to provide access to schools and clinics during flood periods. The project is expected to be completed by March 2019 and so far it is progressing well, and 43% of the work has been completed,” says RA spokesperson Hileni Fillemon.

    “The project has been split into six construction lots with different lengths of access roads to be constructed. Five lots are currently under construction.”

    Former works minister Alpheus !Naruseb commissioned the project last year as part of a climate-change mitigation programme co-funded by the government and the German development bank KfW.

    !Naruseb said they were expected to apply labour-based construction methods.

    Fillemon says the RA has adopted a capacity building approach that differs from previous labour-based contracts in Namibia.

    “The objective is to provide opportunities for emerging contractors who gained experience on previous labour-based projects as SME contractors and have successfully participated in the emerging contractor courses offered by the RA.”

    During the past rainy season, 64 schools were closed in Omusati, and 19 309 pupils were sent home because of the seasonal efundja flooding.

    At the launch at Okalongo in Omusati, !Naruseb said the road project was an effort to alleviate the plight of rural communities in Ohangwena and Omusati during the rainy season when access to services is cut off.

    The Oshana, Omusati and Ohangwena regions are prone to seasonal flooding that makes roads impassable during the rainy season. The three regions form part of the Cuvelai Delta that starts in Angola and ends at the Etosha Pan.

    ILENI NANDJATO

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: Cowards kill women - PDM
  • Cowards kill women - PDMCowards kill women - PDM Popular Democratic Movement (PDM) Ohangwena regional coordinator, Hidipo Hamata, says women are dying like “cockroaches, rats and flies at the hands of cowards who call themselves men”.

    He was reacting to the murder of a 38-year-old woman by her ex-boyfriend at Etomba village in the Ondobe constituency about a week ago.

    “This sad news has affected us tremendously in a negative way, as our women continue to perish in ways that can only be perceived as barbaric and evil… Their deaths can be likened to those of cockroaches, rats and flies, at the hands of cowards who call themselves men - people that society regards as responsible men,” Hamata said.

    He said women play a very important role in society and therefore men should always respect them and avoid senseless acts of abusing them or taking their lives.

    “We want to remind the men of Ohangwena and of our neighbouring regions that women are an integral part of our society by nature and thus play various significant roles.”

    Hamata believes the issue of GBV can be tackled if people uphold their Christian teachings and cultural values.

    “The PDM therefore urges all men from the Ohangwena Region to work together as a collective to ensure that gender-based violence is curbed... This can be done by upholding our Christian teachings, upholding our cultural values and by understanding our constitution that provides for the protection of human life.”

    KENYA KAMBOWE

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: MTN shares slide 6%
  • MTN shares slide 6% MTN shares slide 6% Mobile telecommunications company MTN reported a 6.96% decline in headline earnings per share, for the six months ended June 30.

    The share price, which opened at R113.50, dipped just over 4% following the release of the interim results on Wednesday morning. By 11:41, its shares had slid nearly 6% to trade at R107.33.

    The group reported a decline in headline earnings per share (HEPS) from 231 cents to 215c. The HEPS were negatively impacted by a swing of 21c in the contribution from associates and joint ventures, according to the report.

    HEPS were also impacted by interest on a regulatory fine in Nigeria, foreign exchange losses and gains.

    Excluding these items, HEPS declined from 346c to 280c, the report read.

    The group, however, reported improvements in service revenue, up 10.2%, driven by voice revenue growth. Overall revenue came to R62.8bn, down 3.1% from R64.8bn reported for the same period last year. Operating profit was up 4% to R10.8bn, from R10.4bn. Net profit declined 5.2% from R5.2bn reported previously to R4.9bn.

    Net debt increased to R69.8bn, from R57.15bn reported at the end of the 2017 financial year. This was impacted by the weaker rand and the payment of the final dividend under the previous dividend policy, the report read.

    An interim dividend of 175c per share was declared.

    'Encouraging'

    CEO Rob Shuter said the group had an encouraging first half, with improved operational performance across markets such as Nigeria, Ghana and South Africa.

    "We resolved some key regulatory issues in Cameroon and Benin, launched the initial public offering of MTN Ghana and made progress on the IPO of MTN Nigeria.

    "As part of our ongoing portfolio review, we agreed to the sale of MTN Cyprus.

    "During the period the US announced the decision to withdraw the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action with Iran and will re-impose economic sanctions with the country. The first round of sanctions came to effect on August 7 and the second round will come into effect on November 5.

    "The sanctions may limit the ability of the group to repatriate cash from MTN Irancell, including future dividends," MTN warned.

    MTN said it would continue to monitor the situation. So far MTN has repatriated approximately €88m (approximately R1.36bn) from MTN Irancell.

    This includes €61m relating to the full 2017 dividend due and a further €27m of historic dividends.

    "Opportunities for repatriation within the legislative framework continue to exist, however MTN Group has not factored these into our cashflow forecasts," the report read.

    The group’s target growth is 10% to 20% for the medium term. "We are confident that MTN remains well placed to deliver on our medium-term guidance," the report read.

    -Fin24

    0 0

    Bakkie collides with elephantBakkie collides with elephant A double-cab bakkie collided with an elephant on the Nkurenkuru – Rundu main road early Wednesday morning.

    Deputy Commissioner Andreas Shilelo of the Kavango West police said the accident happened at Namavambi village at around midnight.

    Shilelo said the bakkie, with two occupants, was travelling from Nkurenkuru to Rundu when it hit the elephant.

    The driver, who sustained serious injuries, was transported to the Rundu state hospital.

    The elephant left the scene and its condition is unknown.

    Shilelo said Namavambi community members had told the police that they had seen about seven elephants in the area.

    He said the ministry of environment and tourism was tracking the elephants.

    0 0

    Court orders King Elifas to testifyCourt orders King Elifas to testify Oshakati High Court judge Maphios Cheda has granted an order that compels Ondonga king, Immanuel Kauluma Elifas, to give oral testimony in the matter in which a group of councillors are challenging their dismissal.

    Cheda yesterday ordered that the legal teams set a date within 14 days on which the king will be required to testify.

    The court also ordered the six respondents in the matter to settle the legal costs for themselves and the applicants, in terms of the application brought to have the king testify.

    In July last year, King Elifas dismissed the traditional councillors and the fallout is still continuing.

    They are former traditional authority chairperson Peter Kauluma, former secretary Joseph Asino, senior headman for the Ondangwa district John Walenga, former Oshikoto governor Vilho Kamanya, Kashona kaMalulu, Tonata Ngulu and Fillemon Nambili.

    The dismissed leaders, through their lawyer Elize Angula, assisted by George Coleman, made a submission on 30 July that King Elifas must give oral evidence.

    The king's lawyer, Elia Shikongo, assisted by Sandra Miller, objected on the grounds that the applicants wanted to test the king's mental capabilities.

    Last year, Elifas appointed popular northern businessmen Erastus Mvula and Ondangwa mayor Paavo Amwele to replace Walenga as the senior headmen responsible for the Ondangwa district.

    Rainhold Nepolo replaced Asino in the Oniiwe district, Naeman Kambala took over from Kamanya at Amuteya, while former president Sam Nujoma's bodyguard Nepando Amupanda was appointed as secretary and also took over from Kauluma at Ongula yaNetanga.

    Elifas and his five new councillors are the respondents.

    The dismissed councillors remain the gazetted traditional leaders of the Ondonga community and are currently operating from Onethindi as community court justices and assessors, under the justice ministry.

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: Cops defend heavy-handedness
  • Cops defend heavy-handednessCops defend heavy-handednessNanso cries foul over ‘savage tactics’ The police claim they used minimum force during a student protest earlier this week. The police insist they operated within the parameters of the law, amid allegations that they beat and chased students from the city centre to the edges of Katutura during a protest action earlier this week.

    On Tuesday a group of students staged a peaceful protest at the higher education ministry, demanding that it make funds available to the Namibia Students Financial Assistance Fund (NSFAF) to pay their fees.

    The students were confronted by allegedly overtly aggressive Special Reserve Force members.

    Police spokesperson Deputy Commissioner Edwin Kanguatjivi said yesterday the students had refused to leave the ministry building after their meeting with minister Itah Kandjii-Murangi.

    That, he said, prompted the police to employ minimum force.

    He said minimum force may include rubber bullets, water cannons and stun grenades.

    In response to accusations that some students were wounded by the police, Kanguatjivi said no complaints had been laid in this regard.

    “When people are running, sometimes there are stampedes; these people could have fallen,” he said.

    The Namibia National Students Organisation (Nanso) has accused the police of brutalising students and abusing their powers to remove them from the minister's office, adding that their protest was peaceful and orderly.

    It added that armed police officers removed their negotiating team from the minister's boardroom during the negotiations.

    “The removal was humiliating, degrading and an insult to our human dignity and personal integrity. Our benevolence and pure intentions were further reciprocated by nothing but savage antics, as the special field force were called to a peaceful gathering… to assault students with disdain and horrific brutality, which inflicted serious injuries on many of our students, resulted in the seizure of students' personal belongings,” Nanso said.

    It also alleged that some students were unaccounted for, but the police denied having arrested anyone.

    Kandjii-Murangi said the police's behaviour was uncalled for.

    According to her there was no need to become violent. She added the students should also not have resisted police instructions to vacate the premises. “The students came really in a peaceful manner and they were very well organised,” she said.

    According to Nanso, a new contract breaching the terms agreed upon by NSFAF and students in 2015 was drafted, meaning that students would now need to add a certain amount to the fixed non-tuition N$17 000 grant given to all funded students.

    “The N$17 000 is not enough and most of us will not be able to afford the remaining amount in order to settle our tuition and non-tuition fees, which may lead to some of us not writing examinations and getting our results,” the students said. During the protest they demanded that this contract be terminated as soon as possible and should the minister fail to advocate for this, she too should terminate her contract as minister. Kandjii-Murangi, however, informed the students that NSFAF had indeed fulfilled its promise to the students, adding that it had paid the students' full tuition fees, although cases may arise in which students are required to use their own money to supplement the tuition and non-tuition fees paid by NSFAF due to the differences in fields of study.

    The minister urged the students to understand the current situation and help meet the government halfway, until such time the government is back on its feet.

    0 0

    Enhancing economic growth through SMEsEnhancing economic growth through SMEs The Namibia Procurement Fund (NamPro Fund), in partnership with Pupkewitz Megabuild, recently concluded a two-day SME training workshop held at the Nust Hotel School which focused on skills transfer in the area of financial and tax management.

    As drivers of local economic growth, SMEs are often a source of great innovation and diversity, providing employment and tax revenue, and these companies are emerging as key instruments in poverty reduction. Operators in this sector need to be adequately equipped so as to foster national economic growth. This makes the need for services offered by institutions such as NamPro Fund, Pupkewitz Megabuild and Deloitte & Touche all the more pertinent to Namibian economic development. The NamPro Fund and Pupkewitz Megabuild have scheduled further training for SMEs which will take place in Keetmanshoop and Walvis Bay later this year.

    The SME development officer of the Centre for Enterprise Development at Nust, Helena Ilovu, added, “The lack of adequate financial management skills is one of the biggest obstacles facing many Namibian SMEs. These SMEs fail to operate profitably because SME owners are not adequately capacitated to manage their business finances, so much so that some SMEs are forced to suspend operations because they are unable to pay their employees on time or even pay back their loans to financial institutions.”

    According to a World Bank report, SMEs are playing an increasingly important role in addressing urgent developmental challenges in emerging economies. These entities constitute a major source of employment and generate significant domestic and export earnings. According to a study from the International Finance Corporation, SMEs account for more than half of all formal jobs worldwide, and their share of aggregate employment is comparable to that of large firms.

    However, only a few of the operators within this sector have been able to identify and capitalise on the opportunities available to them. This is due to the fact that in sub-Saharan Africa, SMEs are severely hampered by an under developed business environment.

    A Menon Business Economics report states that bureaucratic red tape, corruption, complex entry regulations, and others, provide few incentives to become (or remain) active in the formal part of the economy. The report goes on to add that in many of these countries, a large share of SMEs is not participating in the formal economy. Without being a formal enterprise, access to finance, new market opportunities and public sector services are severely hampered.

    In Namibia, the Namibian Business and Investment Climate Survey indicates that SMEs and SME owners have not really explored the possibilities in the Namibian SME space. The survey indicates that there is a definite need for greater skills development within the sector in Namibia in order to realise broader national economic growth, especially the enhancement of soft skills, such as financial management.

    0 0

    2018 Namibia Employee Benefit Survey 2018 Namibia Employee Benefit Survey Mari-Nelia Hough



    The results of the 2018 PwC Namibian Employee Benefit Survey was recently published.

    The research was conducted to ascertain the benefit trends utilised by Namibian organisations, in both the public and private business sectors, for the attraction, engagement and retention of key skills in a highly competitive marketplace.

    This publication provides Namibian organisations with a best practice guide and provides detailed guidance in terms of their decision-making processes. Where meaningful, both the employee level and the business sector analysis has been provided.

    Survey background

    The Total Guaranteed Package (TGP) concept has been firmly entrenched in organisations for years. The unintended consequence thereof, however, is reducing the perceived value and importance of benefits.

    A typical TGP comprises around 30% benefits. These typically include retirement, medical aid, a housing and vehicle allowance, and in some instances, a guaranteed end-of-year bonus.

    Employees focus on TGP and do not always consider the value of these benefits and the real costs or savings therein.

    For example, retirement funding at rates well below market costs, due to closed funds with significant negotiating power.

    While paying a higher TGP to employees is costly and might differentiate you from the market, having a detailed benefit structure that is attractive to your employees’ individual needs will make your company’s reward structure distinctive from the market.

    There is, however, very little known trends in the market on how to effectively apply a comprehensive benefit structure and actual practises are broad with no guidelines.

    The 2018 PwC Namibian Employee Benefit Survey is a comprehensive publication that will provide Namibian organisations with a best practise guide in making informed decisions regarding their employee reward systems or at a minimum provide a ‘checklist’ of typical benefits utilised in the market.

    This guide will provide the ability to benchmark the competitiveness of benefits, such as leave, housing and travel allowances, retirement funding, medical coverage, etc. and communicate the market practices effectively to employees.

    This publication provides detailed and current benefit trend information for employee policies and benefits across a broad spectrum of industries.

    It is clear from the analysed market trends that very few guidelines existed within Namibia and companies were forced to ‘invent’ their own application rules of benefits.

    Furthermore, it is vital to not only have a feel for what the market is doing, as there is no ‘one size fits all’, but more so, companies need to know what employees’ specific needs are in this regard. Take the time and effort and allow them to voice their needs either informally or with a formal employee survey.

    We hope that this publication and future publications in this regard will provide you with the best practises to build on those employee benefit structures that will not just differentiate your organisation from the rest, but put you at that distinctive level to be the employer of choice to your employees.

    Mari-Nelia Hough is the senior manager: people & organisation: reward at PwC Namibia

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: Helena’s colourful journey
  • Helena’s colourful journeyHelena’s colourful journey Helena Haitembu is a mechanical graduate and an auto technician at Pupkewitz BMW. Octavia Tsibes

    Haitembu breaks barriers in the mechanic industry

    Her journey has not been colourful and took her away from her original path of becoming a travel agent.

    “My initial vision was to be a travel agent, but a new path for me began with my brothers, when they decided to groom me into this very path,” she said.

    “I first started working and training as an auto technician under my brother, Onesmus Haitembu’s supervision.”

    She said her brother decided to enrol her at a vocational training centre (VTC) and paid her fees.

    While she was still at the VTC, she did internships at various places that played a huge role in who she has become today.

    “I left the VTC in 2015 and started working at Danric Auto, which has now been taken over by Pupkewitz BMW.”

    Pupkewitz Group is a proud company with a rich heritage, rooted in this beautiful country.

    Recognised as a market leader and contributor to key sectors of the country’s economy, the legacy of the group and its founder, the late Harold Pupkewitz, is built on a rich history of entrepreneurship and economic transformation.

    Over the years, Pupkewitz and its various divisions have invested extensively in the development of Namibia and the social progression of her people, through various and targeted projects and initiatives. The group looks forward to more strategic partnerships, aimed at continuously creating exciting opportunities towards equitable and sustainable development, as outlined in the Fifth National Development Plan (NDP5), the Harambee Prosperity Plan and Vision 2030.

    Haitembu says being a female auto technician has its challenges, especially when your capabilities are sometimes underestimated.

    “But I enjoy the challenge, which I regard as one of my hobbies. Never let your gender decide what you are supposed to be and who you are supposed to be. My job changed how I look and how I act, but I am okay with it. I encourage every female to become pilots if they want to, to become miners if they want to, to pave roads if they want to and to fix cars if they want to.”

    Haitembu says one should always chase your dreams.

    “Do not stray on behalf of others, because it is your journey to walk, not theirs, and you decide what happens. Always stay focused, love one another and work together.”

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: SOE infighting
  • SOE infightingSOE infighting It is no secret the Namibian economy is in trouble and that state-owned enterprises (SOEs) over the years have gobbled up millions in taxpayer money in terms of bailouts.

    However, Namcor has seemingly bucked this trend over the years by actually staying afloat and registering profit. In terms of its retail aspirations, the company is hoping to rake in millions while it is also likely to be faced with the management of the soon-to-be completed national oil storage facility at Walvis Bay. However in the midst of all these challenges, the parastatal seems to be more focused on internal battles, pitting current CEO Immanuel Mulunga against the board led by lawyer Patrick Kauta, for reasons that still remain a mystery to taxpayers. Namcor recently charged Mulunga after he was initially placed on compulsory leave to allow for smooth investigations by an audit firm. Questions have been asked about the motive of the investigation as well as the associated costs, which reportedly topped over N$4 million. The Namcor board has been at pains to explain their decision to enlist a private auditing company without the necessary procurement procedures being followed. This has heightened fears regarding a possible plot to remove the accounting officer for whatever reasons. The Namcor board's actions mirror that of their counterparts at TransNamib, who also allegedly didn't follow proper procurement procedures in appointing a law firm to oversee a disciplinary process for one of its executives. In this case the CEO of the company was not even consulted and the question remains how a board can be involved in the day-to-day running of such an important parastatal like TransNamib. This meddling in affairs holds dire consequences for corporate governance and it increasingly seems as if there are simply personality clashes involved, instead of moves to bolster the efficient running of an entity. We would like to remind those involved that state entities should be run in the interest of the taxpayers and should not be a playground to settle personal scores.

    0 0

    Namibia takes over SADC committee chairNamibia takes over SADC committee chairRegional summit focuses on infrastructure The 38th SADC summit started in Windhoek yesterday and will run until 18 August. The 38th Southern African Development Community (SADC) summit started with the handing over of the Standing Committee of the Senior Officials chairpersonship yesterday.

    Namibian international relations permanent secretary Selma Ashipala-Musavyi took over the chairpersonship of the standing committee from outgoing chair Sandile Schalk from South Africa.

    In her acceptance speech, Ashipala-Musavyi said Namibia was honoured to assume the chairpersonship of the organisation, whose objectives are to address socio-economic challenges in the region.

    Other objectives include achieving development and economic growth, alleviating poverty and enhancing the standard and quality of life of the people of southern Africa and supporting the socially disadvantaged through regional integration.

    The summit is taking place under the theme 'Promoting Infrastructure Development and Youth Empowerment for Sustainable Development' and will end on 18 August.

    Ashipala-Musavyi said the theme illustrates that infrastructure development and youth empowerment are vital in driving SADC toward industrialisation and addressing the socio-economic realities of the continent.

    “I am pleased to state that there have been notable progress in many sectors, especially infrastructural connectivity, economic development and trade, as well as ensuring that peace and security prevails in the region,” she said.

    She added that it is crucial that the organisation implements programmes and strategies that member states have commonly adopted, for the benefit of all its people.

    Schalk said the organ has a collective responsibility to substantially improve the quality of life, opportunities and prosperity of the people of southern Africa through the realisation of sustainable economic development and regional integration.

    He said by following the priorities set out in fundamentally adopted frameworks including the Regional Indicative Strategic Development Plan, the SADC Industrialisation Strategy and Roadmap and the Strategic Indicative Plan of the Organ, it continues to advance the region.

    “These strategies and frameworks are all linked to the overarching SADC objectives of regional political and security stability and economic development through increased market integration,” Schalk said.

    The chairperson and vice-chairperson of the standing committee are appointed from the member states that hold the chairpersonship and vice-chairpersonship of the council.

    NAMPA

    0 0
  • 08/09/18--16:00: Klein speaks agriculture
  • Klein speaks agricultureKlein speaks agricultureDoing what he loves best Arnold Klein says his passion for agribusiness drives him. Octavia Tsibes

    Arnold Klein took up the position as CEO of one of the largest agribusinesses in Namibia, Agra, in 2015.

    Over his years in service of this company, Klein has brought many changes - from changes in the culture, attitude and work ethics of employees, to turning around the retail and wholesale sides of the business. Agra has in its 38 years of existence, established itself as a business with a strong business ethic that prides itself on its service to its customers.

    Klein is a born Namibian and grew up on a farm in the south of Namibia. After primary school he furthered his schooling and studies in Stellenbosch, South Africa. He obtained his honours degree in 1991, qualifying as an agricultural economist.

    “I started at Agra in 2003 as manager of the retail and wholesale division and served in this position until I was appointed as CEO. My passion for agribusiness drives me,” Klein says.

    Before his career in agribusiness, he was employed by the government at the directorate of planning as an agricultural economist. Here he gained experience in the agricultural sector, focusing on agricultural policies, production economics, food security and international trade.

    The experience he gained helped him a lot when he entered the private sector, where he was later appointed as general manager of the Hardap Cooperative in 1996, a position he held for more than seven years.

    Pull-out: “We at Agra believe in the significance of our company, a key partner and role-player in the agricultural industry, creating prosperity and providing a better life for all Namibians.”

    Agra’s products and services have expanded to serving agriculture as a whole, through its retail and wholesale business, auctioneering services, properties division, DIY offering, hunting and outdoor ranges, as well as training and consultancies provided by Agra ProVision. Agra serves as a one-stop shop for the entire community through its countrywide branch network and its wide range of products.

    Agra’s vision, with Klein at the lead, is to be a resource for growth, living the purpose of creating prosperity and improving the quality of life of all Namibians.

    Fact box

    · Klein owns a farm, thus knows the challenges and expectations of a farmer.

    · Klein loves to travel and experience different cultures, he believes that any insight gained in life also helps in business.

    · Besides being a serious and results-driven leader, Klein has a creative and artistic side and loves to paint.

    · He also enjoys adrenalin sport activities; it gives you a different perspective and makes you forget about your stress, he says.

    · He loves and respects nature and is passionate about agriculture and business.

    · Klein believes that working and living with passion, taking ownership and responsibility and being consistent are the most important factors for a life of excellence. The same goes for success in a business, where excellent customer service will always attract more clients and increase market share.

    0 0

    2018 Namibia Employee Benefit Survey 2018 Namibia Employee Benefit Survey The results of the 2018 PwC Namibian Employee Benefit Survey was recently published.

    The research was conducted to ascertain the benefit trends utilised by Namibian organisations, in both the public and private business sectors, for the attraction, engagement and retention of key skills in a highly competitive marketplace.

    This publication provides Namibian organisations with a best practice guide and provides detailed guidance in terms of their decision-making processes. Where meaningful, both the employee level and the business sector analysis has been provided.

    Survey background

    The Total Guaranteed Package (TGP) concept has been firmly entrenched in organisations for years. The unintended consequence thereof, however, is reducing the perceived value and importance of benefits.

    A typical TGP comprises around 30% benefits. These typically include retirement, medical aid, a housing and vehicle allowance, and in some instances, a guaranteed end-of-year bonus.

    Employees focus on TGP and do not always consider the value of these benefits and the real costs or savings therein.

    For example, retirement funding at rates well below market costs, due to closed funds with significant negotiating power.

    While paying a higher TGP to employees is costly and might differentiate you from the market, having a detailed benefit structure that is attractive to your employees’ individual needs will make your company’s reward structure distinctive from the market.

    There is, however, very little known trends in the market on how to effectively apply a comprehensive benefit structure and actual practises are broad with no guidelines.

    The 2018 PwC Namibian Employee Benefit Survey is a comprehensive publication that will provide Namibian organisations with a best practise guide in making informed decisions regarding their employee reward systems or at a minimum provide a ‘checklist’ of typical benefits utilised in the market.

    This guide will provide the ability to benchmark the competitiveness of benefits, such as leave, housing and travel allowances, retirement funding, medical coverage, etc. and communicate the market practices effectively to employees.

    This publication provides detailed and current benefit trend information for employee policies and benefits across a broad spectrum of industries.

    It is clear from the analysed market trends that very few guidelines existed within Namibia and companies were forced to ‘invent’ their own application rules of benefits.

    Furthermore, it is vital to not only have a feel for what the market is doing, as there is no ‘one size fits all’, but more so, companies need to know what employees’ specific needs are in this regard. Take the time and effort and allow them to voice their needs either informally or with a formal employee survey.

    We hope that this publication and future publications in this regard will provide you with the best practises to build on those employee benefit structures that will not just differentiate your organisation from the rest, but put you at that distinctive level to be the employer of choice to your employees.

    Mari-Nelia Hough is the senior manager: people & organisation: reward at PwC Namibia

older | 1 | .... | 825 | 826 | (Page 827) | 828 | 829 | .... | 912 | newer