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Tells it All - Namibian Sun

older | 1 | .... | 794 | 795 | (Page 796) | 797 | 798 | .... | 1152 | newer

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: First-year survival kit
  • First-year survival kitFirst-year survival kitCoping with first semester failure With winter school and preparations for supplementary examinations in full swing, The Zone spoke to seasoned university students about the best coping methods for those who failed their first semester exams. Tunohole Mungoba

    According to university graduates, tertiary studies are never an easy ride.

    One has to experience a few bumps and glitches before successfully walking out of a university with your hard-earned degree.

    Many first-year university students can attest to this fact, as they confront the spectre of having failed a few modules in their first semester.

    They will now be forced to write a supplementary examination or repeat the module.

    Namibia University of Science and Technology (Nust) SRC president, Marvellous Shilongo, says the most important thing for first-year students to remember is that university and high school are not the same thing. “University requires another level of thinking. If you are one of those learners that memorises your notes during your study sessions, you will not cope at university. Always try your best to think outside the box,” she urged.

    Shilongo says failure does not mean the end of your life.

    “It just simply means it (your life) has been put on hold for a while.”

    She, however, says it should not become a norm for students to get comfortable with writing supplementary exams.

    “Some people opt to skip the first exam and sit for the second opportunity exams, because they have more time to study, which is fine. Our institution offers help to any of our students who struggle with exams,” said Shilongo.

    She listed a lack of taking responsibility as one of the factors which can lead students failing at university.

    “Many students who were at schools that didn’t teach them responsibility and who were spoon-fed really struggle. It is really important to note that university involves a lot of freedom. A learner that passed with 25 points in five subjects could perform better than a learner who passed with 50 points in five subjects (at school). It all boils down to responsibility,” she said.

    Nust provides the opportunity to struggling students to make use of the mathematics and science tutorial centre on campus and they are also welcome to sit in during distance learning lessons.

    “It is absolutely free. We have the best science and mathematics students who help during these tutorial classes.”

    Shilongo urged students to speak to campus counsellors and see if they need any psychological help. “Graduating is very important, but it should never consume you. If you feel you are slowly getting depressed, you should always remember to take a break.”

    University of Namibia SRC president Tuhafeni Kalola says the institution offers winter and summer schools. However, not everyone qualifies for the winter school.

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: First-year survival kit
  • First-year survival kitFirst-year survival kit With winter school and preparations for supplementary examinations in full swing, The Zone spoke to seasoned university students about the best coping methods for those who failed their first semester exams. Coping with first semester failure

    Tunohole Mungoba

    According to university graduates, tertiary studies are never an easy ride.

    One has to experience a few bumps and glitches before successfully walking out of a university with your hard-earned degree.

    Many first-year university students can attest to this fact, as they confront the spectre of having failed a few modules in their first semester.

    They will now be forced to write a supplementary examination or repeat the module.

    Namibia University of Science and Technology (Nust) SRC president, Marvellous Shilongo, says the most important thing for first-year students to remember is that university and high school are not the same thing. “University requires another level of thinking. If you are one of those learners that memorises your notes during your study sessions, you will not cope at university. Always try your best to think outside the box,” she urged.

    Shilongo says failure does not mean the end of your life.

    “It just simply means it (your life) has been put on hold for a while.”

    She, however, says it should not become a norm for students to get comfortable with writing supplementary exams.

    “Some people opt to skip the first exam and sit for the second opportunity exams, because they have more time to study, which is fine. Our institution offers help to any of our students who struggle with exams,” said Shilongo.

    She listed a lack of taking responsibility as one of the factors which can lead students failing at university.

    “Many students who were at schools that didn’t teach them responsibility and who were spoon-fed really struggle. It is really important to note that university involves a lot of freedom. A learner that passed with 25 points in five subjects could perform better than a learner who passed with 50 points in five subjects (at school). It all boils down to responsibility,” she said.

    Nust provides the opportunity to struggling students to make use of the mathematics and science tutorial centre on campus and they are also welcome to sit in during distance learning lessons.

    “It is absolutely free. We have the best science and mathematics students who help during these tutorial classes.”

    Shilongo urged students to speak to campus counsellors and see if they need any psychological help. “Graduating is very important, but it should never consume you. If you feel you are slowly getting depressed, you should always remember to take a break.”

    University of Namibia SRC president Tuhafeni Kalola says the institution offers winter and summer schools. However, not everyone qualifies for the winter school.

    “Your continuous assessment (CA) marks plus your examination mark should amount from 45 to 49% for you to qualify for winter school which has been on-going for the past two weeks now,” says Kalola.

    “However, with winter school, you need to pay the same amount the module costs to have winter school. Modules begin from N$1200 and above. We also have special examinations which are written after the first exams. These are only provided for very special cases such as medical reasons,” he explained.

    Kalola says failure is never expected and he advises students that it is not the end of the world.

    “Having too much pride can cause a lot of damage in university. Just because you were an A* student in high school, you now know everything. It is a whole new different game and one needs to focus on grasping as much content as possible,” he said.

    According to Kalola, the university does experience a few glitches when it comes to rolling out supplementary exams.

    “The university lecturers and students experience immense pressure as there is no exact number of students writing sups. This includes the quality of the marking as well” he says.

    Kalola advised students to always accept their failure and try to improve their next result.

    “In life, it is always best to learn from your mistakes and make sure you study extremely hard and also to pass your supplementary exams,” he said.

    Failure and its psychological effects

    Windhoek based clinical psychologist, Cynthia Beukes says that failure is largely dependent on your perspective.

    “If you regard failure as an isolated incident and are confident that you are able to master the work, failure will only be a hurdle and it will not affect you that much. If however you focus on the failure you will be affected and this will hamper your success,”

    “The manner in which you respond to failure is largely influenced by your self-esteem. Those with higher self-esteem will regard it as a hurdle to overcome and forge ahead” explains the clinical psychologist.

    Beukes says there are also negative effects that are associated with failure and students should make sure it does not consume them.

    “Failure has the ability to erode your self-esteem. Failure may make you view yourself negatively, make you view your world as a negative place and make you view the future as bleak. You may be depressed and not see the need to try again” she narrated.

    She also mentioned that “some people may develop perfectionistic tendencies living with a constant sense of failure, despite seeing evidence to the contrary.”

    Beukes urges parents to not make it difficult for their children writing supplementary exams as they are already struggling to cope.

    “It can be very difficult for parents when their children fail because parents may view their children as an extension of themselves. Additionally they may have extra financial burden as a result of the child's failure.”

    She further advised parents to be more supportive to their children.

    “The shame they feel due to the disrepute as well as the financial pressure and various other reasons, parents may lash out. Understand that failing is not a voluntary thing. No one actively seeks to fail. If your child failed, remember that they are going through the same disappointment, shame and self-loathing as you are but at a greater scale. Be compassionate. Listen with an empathetic ear and see where your child may need support in future.”

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    Lexus LC named Coupe of the YearLexus LC named Coupe of the YearLC 500 Limited Edition to be released In the Auto Express 2018 Driver Power Survey Auto Express editor-in-chief Steve Fowler - “The Lexus LC is every bit as special to look at as its concept, and to drive one is just the same.” Only a few months after being named Best Manufacturer in the Auto Express 2018 Driver Power customer satisfaction survey, Lexus continues to set the pace with the announcement that the luxury LC coupe has also won the prestigious Coupe of the Year award.

    The annual Driver Power survey is based on the opinions of more than 80 000 UK motorists, offering criticism – or praise – in nine categories and 31 different areas.

    “Our Driver Power satisfaction survey allows owners to leave no stone unturned when giving feedback on their cars,” said automotive managing editor, Stuart Milne. “To be crowned the best, a manufacturer can have no slip-ups, and this year the competition was extremely tough.”

    Lexus owners have already rated the brand strongly across the board, topping the rankings for interior quality, comfort and build quality. But for this award it was the more emotional element of the sleek, concept-like LC that drew particular praise.

    “When Lexus revealed the LF-LC concept at the 2012 Detroit Motor Show, few people thought the car would make it to the showroom looking that good – including us. Surely Lexus wouldn’t be brave enough to bring out a production car that bold,” Auto Express editor-in-chief Steve Fowler went on to explain.

    “Rarely are we so happy to be that wrong. The Lexus LC is every bit as special to look at as its concept, and to drive one is just the same.”

    In collecting the award, Lexus UK director Ewan Shepherd said that, “the LC has driven home the message that our brand is one of the most visionary, original and exciting out there. With LC we have shown these are not just words but that our bold vision for the future of Lexus goes beyond concepts and into showrooms.

    “We’re delighted that our flagship coupe, which has created such a halo effect for our brand, has been recognised by Auto Express.”

    The Southern African market can look forward to the upcoming LC 500 Limited Edition to be introduced in late August 2018. This Limited Edition LC will be offered in extremely limited numbers, available in a V8-powered engine, featuring a dazzling, iridescent new shade of blue (called Morphic Blue) that takes vehicle colour to a new level. - MotorPress

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: Online photo ban a concern
  • Online photo ban a concernOnline photo ban a concernSick lawyer delays murder trial While there has been support for the ban of trophy hunting pictures on social media, some experts are concerned about where this type of government control may end. Although the recent ban on social media photos of trophy hunted wildlife has been applauded as the ministry of environment's attempt to protect Namibia's hunting industry from anti-hunting lobbyists, some stakeholders are worried about the long-term ripple effects of a state-imposed big brother watch on advertising and online expression.

    The introduction of a new hunting permit condition last week by the ministry that forbids the posting or sending of trophy hunting photographs on public platforms following widespread international calls to boycott Namibia as a tourism destination, has fuelled the debate whether the ban could open the floodgates to future state restrictions on online expression and advertising.

    Gitta Paetzold of the Hospitality Association of Namibia (HAN) told Namibian Sun that HAN has been flooded by anti-hunting lobbyists threatening a boycott of Namibia as a tourist destination under the hashtag #NotmyHoliday.

    She said despite online claims,

    however, that thousands of potential tourists are no longer considering the country as a tourism destination, HAN “is not aware of major cancellations of bookings made for Namibia in recent weeks, despite some of the emails and social media posts claiming people have struck Namibia off their bucket-list”.

    Paetzold cautioned, however, that while the association understands the ministry's intention to ban photos of trophy hunted wildlife “as this seems to provide ammunition for the lobbyists and animal protectionists”, HAN is worried about the wider impact of such a ban.

    “We are somewhat concerned that the call by the minister could set a precedent in terms of controlling advertising in Namibia, with product and service providers then being forced to have their branding and marketing material 'filtered' by authorities first.”

    Paetzold supported the call by the Namibian Professional Hunting Association (Napha), which has also expressed concern, to meet with the ministry to “find a way forward in the interest of positive marketing and messaging around Namibia's sustainable hunting practices”.

    Paetzold said the issue of hunting versus photo tourism is “an old one here in Namibia” and a balance is crucial in ensuring that international travellers continue to visit the country.

    “Social media needs to be handled with care and sensitivity and we should not allow it to be abused for cheap and uninformed lobby work and activities by those who do not know, nor have an interest in the full picture of Namibia.”

    She said the country has been globally hailed as having created areas “where people and wildlife live in relative harmony side by side and where the country and its people have committed themselves to the sustainable use of resources”.



    Watchdog concerns

    Maximilian Weylandt of the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) said the restriction by the ministry is worrying in terms of “the relationship between government and the freedom of speech online”.

    He said the need to “suppress expression merely for the fact that it brings negative public relations is concerning to me. As a matter of principle I think this would set a bad precedent.”

    Weylandt cautioned while there should be exceptions that need to be clearly set down in law, such as the distribution of child pornography, “government patrolling social media to impose sanctions for content it does not approve of” would not only be an inefficient waste of scarce resources, but raises serious questions of government interference.

    “You might agree with the ban on hunting photos, but what if government decides to start imposing bans on posting other content that show Namibia in a negative light? This is not a road we should go down.”



    Industry guideline advice

    In a statement issued on Friday, Napha welcomed the ministry's intention but criticised the lack of prior consultation with industry stakeholders.

    Napha has requested a meeting with the ministry to clarify the scope of the restrictions and to advise on future guidelines for responsible advertising for the industry on social media, websites and brochures.

    Napha noted that it will also advise the ministry “to continue to condition all quota settings and permits on the restriction on advertising of specific trophy animals”.

    It further noted that Napha suggests the approval of any advertisements for specific animals “should be obtained from the Director of Parks and Wildlife”.

    Napha president Danene van der Westhuyzen underlined that the issue of posting trophy hunting photos online has been a long-standing dilemma and members had been warned “against insensitive advertising on social media and the internet which can possibly lead to outbursts by animal rights groups against hunting in general”.

    She said despite the warnings many individuals have not complied with the request and “this, together with recent uproars on human-wildlife conflict issues and a lot of noise on social media platforms without valid facts and information, found the minister with no option but to react”.

    She said the minister's statement was “made with the intention of improving the safeguarding of trophy hunting in Namibia, and we are advising the public and our members to support him in this”.

    Van der Westhuyzen nevertheless underscored the crucial need for advertising and said the ministry has been advised on previous occasions to “not purposefully hinder any company from being able to advertise its services, accommodations and experience to the clients”.

    JANA-MARI SMITH

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    Sick lawyer delays trial in love triangle sagaSick lawyer delays trial in love triangle saga The trial of Gobabis resident, Rachel Rittmann, who allegedly connived with her lover to murder her husband in August 2013, has seen another postponement due to the absence of her state-funded lawyer.

    The trial was scheduled to kick off before High Court Judge Christie Liebenberg yesterday, but could not proceed because Rittmann's defence lawyer Hipura Ujaha is on sick leave for three days.

    A medical certificate showing that the lawyer suffers from severe hypertension was presented before court.

    The case was postponed to Thursday this week to allow the lawyer to recover and come to court to defend his client.

    State advocates Martino Olivier and Ethel Ndlovu, who are representing the prosecution in the matter, did not object to the postponement of the case.

    The 46-year-old Rittmann is charged in the matter with her lover, Ryno Ricardo du Preez, 34, in respect of the death of her husband Rudolf Rittmann, whose burnt remains were found in his car on the Windhoek-Gobabis road on 23 August 2013.

    The trial is set to run until 15 August 2018.

    The date for the trial was only decided upon after reports were released by two private psychiatrists - Reinhardt Sieberhagen and Gerhard Marx - showing Rachel is fit to stand trial and is not suffering from any mental illness as she has claimed since June last year.

    On 20 June 2017, Rachel, through her defence lawyer Ujaha, asked the High Court to undergo 30 days of mental evaluation at the Windhoek Central Hospital's psychiatric unit.

    She was observed by the two private psychiatrists to determine her mental status prior to, at the time, and after the alleged commissioning of the offence after she told the court she has a history of anxiety and depression.

    Rachel and Du Preez face one count of murder each; a count of conspiracy to murder; a count of defeating or obstructing the course of justice; a count of violating a dead body by setting it alight as well as a count of malicious damage to property.

    She allegedly mixed unidentified tablets into her husband's drink and he became drowsy.

    She then called in co-accused Du Preez, who was waiting nearby, to kill him.

    Rudolf was stabbed 20 times with a sharp object, presumably a knife, while he lay in a state of confusion in his bed.

    The two accused then loaded his body into his car and drove it up to the Kappsfarm area, east of Windhoek and a few kilometres from the police checkpoint, where the burnt car was found.

    They allegedly set the vehicle on fire in an effort to cover their tracks.

    Rittmann is being held at the Klein Windhoek Police Station, while Du Preez is being held at the Windhoek Correctional Facility's holding cells until Thursday when they return to court for the start of their trial.



    NAMPA

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: Company news in brief
  • Company news in briefCompany news in brief WhatsApp details Eskom's spy game

    Former Eskom executive Matshela Koko allegedly connived with a Mpumalanga man to get one of his colleagues fired at the state-owned enterprise.

    Koko had previously denied any link to Eskom employee Mandla Mokoena, who allegedly hired three men to spy on Group Capital executive Abram Masango and other Eskom officials stationed at Kusile Power Station, to find any “dirt” on them that could lead to their removal from the power utility.

    One of the men, whose name is known to City Press, deposed a two-page affidavit at Witbank Police Station on March 14. In the document, he alleged that he was tasked with spying and was paid by eWallet for his services.

    -Fin24

    MTN Nigeria yet to file IPO application

    MTN Nigeria is yet to file its application for an initial public offering (IPO), Nigeria’s securities regulator said on Sunday, a much-anticipated share listing that could value the business at around US$5 billion and help revitalise the local stock market.

    The Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC’s) statement came after domestic media reported on Thursday that the local arm of the South African telecoms giant was ready for its shares to be listed.

    “Neither MTN Nigeria Limited nor any of its advisers or representatives has filed any application with the SEC regarding the said IPO,” the regulator said.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    MTN Uganda says security personnel raided its data centre

    MTN Uganda, a unit of the South African telecoms firm, said security personnel had raided its data and disconnected four of its servers.

    The firm said in a July 3 letter to the state-run telecommunications regulator that it had “reported to police a case of illegal intrusion into the data centre and the disconnection of the four information servers.”

    The regulator Uganda Communications Commission (UCC)’s top official confirmed to Reuters receipt of the letter.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    Huawei says does not expect US sanctions

    China’s Huawei, the world’s largest maker of telecommunication network equipment, does not see itself becoming the target of US sanctions and will keep buying US chips this year, one of its three rotating chairmen told a French newspaper.

    Huawei HWT.UL, also the world’s third-largest smartphone maker, is a private company but has found itself battling perceptions of ties to the Chinese government, which it has repeatedly denied.

    Several US lawmakers last month claimed its research funding to American universities posed a “significant threat” to national security, the latest difficulty Huawei has faced operating in the United States.

    -Nampa/Reuters

    BP in lead to acquire BHP's US assets

    BP Plc is in the lead to acquire the US onshore shale oil and gas assets of BHP Billiton Ltd after submitting an offer worth well in excess of US$10 billion, people familiar with the matter said on Friday.

    The move represents a big bet by BP on US oil and gas production at a time when energy prices are rebounding. It would allow it to significantly rebalance its business with oil production, after focusing largely on natural gas assets.

    -Nampa/Reuters

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    There is no miracle - ShifetaThere is no miracle - Shifeta Environment and tourism minister Pohamba Shifeta has urged religious leaders in Namibia to preach the real gospel and start telling their followers the truth.

    Shifeta said that many Namibians have become lazy because of churches telling them to do nothing but wait for God to perform miracles in their lives.

    “There are some churches telling people not to work and that they should wait for God to perform miracles on them. This is not the reality and I am urging religious leaders to start preaching the true gospel and telling people the truth. There is no such thing like manna falling from heaven. People need to work hard for themselves because God will never perform miracles like that,” Shifeta said.

    He said this while addressing the community of Okapya village near Ondangwa during the inauguration of the Endjala Traditional House of the John and Penny (J&P) Group.

    Shifeta urged people to utilise their mahangu fields and make sure they produce enough food for their families. He said that people must at least be able to produce 30% of their food consumption by themselves.

    “People are now migrating to towns just to live in kambashus and shanty houses and then they start calling on the government to give them drought relief food. Why must government give these people drought relief food? They must go back to their houses and work on their mahangu fields,” he said.

    Shifeta also urged traditional leaders to protect their communities against the exploitation of land by business people through sand mining. He said his ministry has temporarily allowed sand mining while it is drafting the necessary policies that will protect the environment against excessive and illegal sand mining.

    “It is not that we are against sand mining, we are only trying to protect the land and its resources for the benefit of the people and future generations,” he said.

    On Saturday, the minister also addressed the commemorations of the arrival of the Finnish Missionaries in the country 148 years ago to establish the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Namibia's (ELCIN) mission at Engela parish and urged the church to start playing its role in the protection of the environment.



    ILENI NANDJATO

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: Caprivi 'agitators' arrested
  • Caprivi 'agitators' arrestedCaprivi 'agitators' arrestedPolice say they know objective of meeting The Zambezi police arrested five Caprivi Concerned Group leaders the weekend, saying their intelligence informed them the meeting was to agitate for secession of the region. The police in the Zambezi Region on Sunday arrested five leaders of the Caprivi Concerned Group (CCG) at Liselo village, some 10km outside Katima Mulilo.

    The Namibian police's regional crime investigation coordinator, Deputy Commissioner Evans Simasiku, confirmed the arrests to Nampa.

    He said a case would be opened by the police and the five would be charged with sedition, incitement of public violence and contravening article 21 (2) of the Namibian constitution, which deals with national security and public order.

    The group was arrested after they attempted to hold a public meeting at Liselo.

    According to Simasiku, based on their investigations, the agenda of the meeting was to organise and mobilise those who allegedly still harbour ideas to secede the Zambezi Region from the rest of the country.

    He said the group wanted supporters to have a demonstration and demand that police officers who were involved in the arrests of August 1999 be prosecuted.

    In the then Caprivi in August 1999, an armed conflict erupted between the Caprivi Liberation Army (CLA), a group aiming for the secession of the Caprivi Strip led by former politician Mishake Muyongo, and the Namibian government. The main eruption occurred on 2 August when the CLA launched an attack in Katima Mulilo, occupying the state-run radio station and attacking a police station, the Wanella border post and an army base. Namibian armed forces quashed the attempt at secession within a few days.

    The CCG also apparently wanted to demand that the graves of those who died during this conflict be known.

    The group further allegedly wants to advance the activities of Muyongo, the exiled former DTA and United Democratic Party (UDP) president, to secede the Zambezi Region from the rest of Namibia.

    Simasiku said “though the group wants to hide from the truth, the Namibian police have evidence that they are planning to secede the region through the moral support of the banned UDP”.

    He added: “The mission and vision of the Caprivi Concerned Group is very clear and in addition, they are still saying Muyongo is the president of UDP and that of the Caprivi Strip, now Zambezi Region.”

    An attempt by the CCG to hold a meeting two weeks ago, for which they called a media briefing, was also stopped by the police.

    The arrested members were expected to appear in the Katima Mulilo Magistrate's Court on Monday if their charges were finalised, or then Tuesday if not, Simasiku said.

    NAMPA

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: Three landmines detonated
  • Three landmines detonatedThree landmines detonated Three R2M2 anit-personnel landmines were discovered under the NamPower power line near Ruacana and were destroyed under a controlled detonation by the police

    A Tsumeb-based contractor was working on the lines when the landmines were found.

    Inspector Lineekela Shikongo, police spokesperson for Omusati, could not confirm whether the landmines were remnants of the liberation struggle but confirmed that the mines are of South African origin.

    They were designed to injure people walking.

    “This obviously implies that they could be remnants of the border war. Ruacana was one of the areas where battles took place and we urge residents to be alert. Should they find something suspicious, they should report it to the police immediately and should not touch it,” he said.

    Shikongo added that the controlled explosion was successful and there was no damage to infrastructure or any injuries reported.

    The contractors working on the line would not comment and referred all enquiries to NamPower.

    Reportedly, South African forces planted landmines at 409 power poles between Ruacana and the Werda gate during the liberation struggle. They were also strategically placed near the hydro-electric power station to prevent sabotage of the power line to Windhoek.

    Namibia is a signatory to an international accord against landmines and according to a report submitted by the country in 2009, all national clean-ups of landmines were completed in 2001.

    Several landmines have been discovered and destroyed since them.

    In the report, Namibian authorities admitted that there are challenges with artillery that has not been detonated and there are regular but isolated reports of landmines and hand grenades being discovered.

    MgM, a German organisation 'People against Landmines', cleaned up a section of the Ruacana power line in 1999. The organisation also did work in Angola and Mozambique.

    ELVIRA HATTINGH

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    Moulding youth through apprenticeships Moulding youth through apprenticeships NTA announces apprenticeship funding agreement Justicia Shipena



    The Namibia Training Authority (NTA) has announced additional apprenticeship funding agreements with employers under the work-integrated learning Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) pilot project on 5 July in Windhoek.

    In March the organisation entered into apprenticeship funding agreements with 14 employers. A total of 16 training institutions registered by the NTA and accredited by the Namibia Qualifications Authority (NQA) support the assessment of 300 apprentices under the pilot project.

    The pilot project is guided by the underlying principles and requirements stipulated in the TVET policy, to ensure that key and critical processes are tested and verified. The principles include that all apprentices receive a minimum allowance, that training must be based on a qualification registered by the National Qualifications Framework (NQF), that theoretical training must be conducted by a registered and accredited TVET institution and that a training plan, specific to the qualification, must form part of the apprenticeship contract.

    Employers must be approved by the NTA to register apprentices and upon the successful completion of the assessment, the apprentice must receive a recognised certificate.

    According to NTA CEO Jerry Beukes, the TVET project, which they have implemented with local employers, training intuitions and other partners such as the Namibia Employers Federation (NEF), provides an increasing appreciation of its potential in addressing youth employment, while improving firm-level productivity, enhancing national economic competitiveness and accelerating the shift to a knowledge-based society.

    Beukes noted the weight of international evidence supports TVET’s importance in preparing graduates for work-readiness and with industry-relevant skills.

    “No TVET system can ever be considered healthy and relevant if it does not include a robust and appropriate component under which young people can be taken in by employers and trained as well as monitored under work conditions towards attaining national qualifications,” he said.

    Beukes said the NTA has now taken steps towards re-introducing apprenticeships as a key sub-component of work-integrated learning in Namibian workplaces.

    “By doing so this gives us the chance to boost access to equitable and high quality TVET opportunities for young people wishing to embark on technical and vocational career paths,” he said.

    Beukes said the pilot project targets a wide array of training areas, including occupations in hospitality and tourism, automotive mechanics, manufacturing, ICT, business management and agricultural fields.

    Speaking at the same event, Tim Parkhouse, NEF secretary-general, said the NEF and GAN Namibia are pleased to be part of this apprenticeship programme and they appreciate and applaud the NTA for this.

    Parkhouse pointed out that the unemployment crisis in Namibia and the devastating effect it has on the youth makes this programme a small but a vital step in addressing the issue. He also urged the young women and men selected to be hard workers.

    “Be grateful that you have this opportunity, take this opportunity with both hands and work at it; be prepared to put in hard work and sometimes extra hours without expecting extra pay. Do not waste time and money; you have an opportunity that so many others would dearly love to have,” he said.

    Parkhouse also thanked the employers that are prepared to invest time, money and equipment in young people.

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    Nam-mic now shareholder in GondwanaNam-mic now shareholder in GondwanaTransaction to expand tourism group The capital invested will be used for developments like The Desert Grace and the new lodge in the King Nehale Conservancy. We are obsessed with sustainability and therefore we do not practise inclusivity on the strength of envisaged legislation, but rather because we believe it is the right thing to do. – Gys Joubert, MD: Gondwana Holdings Staff Reporter – Gondwana Holdings Ltd last week became Nam-mic Financial Services Holdings’ first strategic partner outside the financial sector, following a year of negotiations.

    The deal was made possible by the Gondwana group’s transformation to a holding company in November 2017. A strategic policy change at Nam-mic also established the enabling environment for the transaction.

    With the signing of the shareholding agreement last Tuesday, Nam-mic became a 10% shareholder in Gondwana Holdings. The capital invested flows directly into the expansion of the tourism group and will be used for developments like The Desert Grace, opening on 1 November, and the new lodge in the King Nehale Conservancy with construction commencing within the next few months.

    “We are obsessed with sustainability and therefore we do not practise inclusivity on the strength of envisaged legislation, but rather because we believe it is the right thing to do,” said Gys Joubert, managing director of Gondwana Holdings.

    “We want to actively build Namibia’s future, not only having sustainability at heart, but also the people of our country and their well-being. We passionately believe tourism can change the future of our beautiful country but for that to happen the benefits must be shared inclusively, from shareholder level to the communities where we operate,” Joubert said.

    Walter Don, chief executive ofiicer of Nam-mic Financial Services Holdings (NFSH), said: “We are joining Gondwana with the best of intentions.”

    ‘Cultural fit’

    According to Don, NFSH wants to get involved and add value to Gondwana. “We are glad that we found a partner in the tourism sector who is a cultural fit and shares the same values,” he said.

    NFSH is a broad-based black economic empowerment company with the vision “to sustainably change/impact the lives of the communities in which we operate”. All its shares are owned by affiliated unions of the National Union of Namibian Workers (NUNW). Other strategic partners are Capricorn Investment Holdings, Santam Namibia and Sanlam Namibia Holdings.

    Since its establishment in 2001, NFSH has successfully evolved into a socio-economic powerhouse beyond its 93 000-strong membership base.

    Upon completion of the restructuring process in November 2017, the Gondwana group issued shares to all of its 800 employees as a once-off gesture of thanks to staff for laying a solid foundation for the company to grow into one of the largest hospitality groups in the country.

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    VIP officer arrested for pedestrian's deathVIP officer arrested for pedestrian's death A VIP directorate police inspector was arrested on Saturday for allegedly driving without a licence and causing an accident in which a pedestrian was killed.

    According to the police, the pedestrian died about 33km from Omuthiya near Uuhama location, after he was knocked over by the unlicensed driver.

    The accident occurred on the Omuthiya/Ondangwa road at about 10:00 on Saturday, when the driver of a Toyota Auris knocked over a pedestrian who was trying to cross the road.

    The pedestrian died on the spot and was identified as 40-year-old Festus Indileni Amweelo from Eyamba village in the Okatope area.

    The 55-year-old suspect has been arrested.

    In another incident in Windhoek, a passenger was killed after the driver, who was allegedly under the influence of alcohol, lost control of a vehicle.

    The accident occurred on Sunday at about 01:37 at the corner of Independence Avenue and Luther Street near Government Office Park.

    It is alleged that six Angolan students were driving in a black Toyota Wish when the 25-year-old driver lost control of the vehicle and it hit a street light. An unidentified passenger, who was sitting in the back behind the driver, died instantly. The driver was tested for alcohol and was found to be over the limit at 0.37mg/1.

    He was arrested.

    In another incident on Saturday at Gibeon, a man stole a car and bumped two women while reversing.

    The suspect apparently stole the car keys at the Dolphin Stream Bar on Saturday night. When he got into the Toyota Corolla and reversed, he knocked over two women who both sustained leg injuries.

    The man then drove to Mariental, where the car was recovered by the police. The suspect was arrested.

    At Keetmanshoop it was reported that a black Audi A4 (registration number unknown) ran over a 10-year-old boy and sped off. The accident happened in the Sonop location on Saturday at about 09:45. The boy sustained serious leg injuries and is in a stable condition in hospital.

    The suspect is unknown.

    Also on Saturday, a 58-year-old man lost control of his car and it overturned multiple times on the Okatana/Oshakati main road. Moses Johannes was travelling from Okatana to Oshakati when the accident occurred.

    He died upon arrival at the Oshakati hospital.









    ELLANIE SMIT

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: NAC faces N$23m lawsuit
  • NAC faces N$23m lawsuitNAC faces N$23m lawsuitEngineering firm sues over airports A consulting engineering firm has approached the High Court in a bid to compel the Namibia Airports Company to settle an outstanding bill totalling over N$23 million for work done. The controversial Ondangwa and Hosea Kutako airport upgrades have made a turn in the High Court, where consulting engineering firm Aurecon Namibia is suing the Namibia Airports Company (NAC) for failing to cough up over N$23 million it is allegedly owed.

    The lawsuit relates to consulting services provided by Aurecon in relation to phase zero and one of the northern airport upgrades, for which the firm says it is owed N$3 194 336.52 in respect of value-added tax (VAT) for services rendered during 2015 and 2016. In the second claim, Aurecon wants the NAC to pay N$227 283.99 for additional consulting services on phase zero and one, which included meetings with the Oshana governor and Ondangwa mayor.

    It also wants payments to the tune of N$250 000 for determining the pavement classification number (PCN) calculation for the Hosea Kutako International Airport. In its third claim, the engineering firm alleged it provided design work to the value of N$8 517 576.04 including VAT, and supervisory services, which cost N$10 951 169.21 for phase two and three of the Ondangwa facility. Aurecon was contracted by the NAC to provide consulting services for the detailed design, site supervision and contract administration of the Ondangwa Airport pavement rehabilitation and upgrade. The application was yesterday scheduled before Judge Herman Oosthuizen for an interlocutory hearing. Aurecon, in their particulars of claim, alleged they entered into a written “contract for consulting services” with the NAC, which was represented by its former chief executive Tamer El-Kallawi. The NAC allegedly agreed to pay Aurecon for the services rendered, amounting to 10% of the project's construction costs.

    The amount accrued interest at the prime lending rate determined by the Bank of Namibia. The firm maintained the NAC is obliged to pay them on the presentation of invoices within 30 days of receipt of each invoice, and that failure to do so would accrue interest at the prime rate.

    “The NAC did not obtain an exemption from VAT for this project and consequently VAT is payable on the amount,” Aurecon argued in terms of the over N$3 million being claimed as a VAT payment. The consulting services for the Hosea Kutako airport were reportedly at a special instance and on request by the NAC during March 2015 to October 2016.

    “Despite demand, the NAC has neglected to pay Aurecon the said amount, which is due and payable,” the engineering firm alleged. Aurecon further maintained it had complied with all its obligations under the agreement.

    According to the firm, the NAC was represented by its former engineering executive, Courage Silombela, who on 7 June 2017 acknowledged in writing the parastatal's indebtedness to Aurecon in the amount of N$20 434 986.95. Aurecon's lawyer wrote to the NAC and recorded the outstanding debts and requested the reasons for the subsequent payment delay. Lot Haifidi, strategic executive for corporate governance at the NAC, said in his sworn statement that Aurecon did not plead properly why it contends it is entitled to the amount of N$197 638.25, excluding VAT. He argued in terms of the contested N$3 194 336.52 in VAT that Aurecon does not have sufficient particulars on whether it indeed paid VAT on the amount invoiced.

    He said on the second claim, Silombela did not have the authority to request Aurecon to perform work outside of the scope of the contract entered into between the two parties.

    On the alleged services rendered relating to determining the pavement classification number calculation for the Hosea Kutako International Airport, Haifidi stated that Silombela was authorised to procure the services of Aurecon. Although he admitted that the company provided design services for phases two and three, he said with regard to the claim for supervision services, the NAC is at pains to admit a claim while the second phase has not yet commenced. He further said the phase two agreement is the subject of a court review and that Aurecon has not rendered supervision services to the NAC in terms of this phase.





    FRED GOEIEMAN

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    Land conference wheels finally in motionLand conference wheels finally in motion JEMIMA BEUKES



    The lands ministry has finally confirmed the country’s much-anticipated second national land conference will take place from 1 to 5 October at the Safari Court Hotel in Windhoek.

    Ministry spokesperson Chrispin Matongela said preparations for conference were in full swing.

    “We have now secured the Safari Court Hotel and Conference Centre for the venue. We will be sending out additional information once Prime Minister Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila has sent out the official announcement. We will then give more information to the public,” he said.

    Uhuru Dempers, convener of the Civil Society Working Group on Land Reform, said they have been invited by the prime minister to serve on a high-level committee tasked with organising the land conference.

    “We have attended two meetings so far. The consultations are starting next week in the regions and the entire July will be dedicated to regional conferences and this is where stakeholders will be invited to present their position papers. And also at the national conference, we have been invited to present our position paper on the draft agenda,” said Dempers.

    Landless People’s Movement (LPM) deputy leader and chief strategist Henny Seibeb, however, said they have not been informed or invited to attend the land conference, but will be sharing their plans with the public during a press briefing later this week.

    “As far as LPM is concerned we have not been invited to the national land conference and we have not received any written or verbal communication from the preparatory committee. Not from the prime minister, minister of land reform or even from President Hage Geingob himself. As it stands, we are not invited. We are cut out from the land conference. What we shall do and what we plan to do will be revealed on Wednesday,” he said.

    Popular Democratic Movement (PDM) leader McHenry Venaani confirmed being invited to be part of the high-level committee.

    “The PDM will be having consultations in the regions and we will have our land conference in September this year,” said Venaani.

    Commenting on the LPM’s exclusion from the high-level committee, Matongela said it is unfair for all political parties and concerned groups to expect to be invited to be part of this committee.

    According to him they have invited key stakeholders that present a certain sector in the country.

    “Nangof (the Namibian Non-Governmental Organisations Forum) represents a lot of organisations; you can imagine if we invite everyone. You cannot expect the whole country to be on the high-level committee. The regional consultations are there and they can be part of those consultations,” he said.

    The leader of the country’s oldest political party, the South West Africa National Union (Swanu), Dr Tangeni Ijambo, said it is a pity they have not been invited to give input, as part of the organising committee.

    The party had also not been notified of the official dates for the land conference, he added.

    “Swanu is the one party that is consistent when it comes to the call for land for the people. One wonders if those that are invited are not are in cahoots with the government.”

    Direction

    Although it is unclear at this point what the exact agenda for the conference will be, it is certain that ancestral land and expropriation with or without compensation are going take centre stage.

    Ancestral land is a major sticking point, given that the first land conference in 1991 had left this issue to simmer, amid a fresh push by pressure groups.

    During his State of the Nation Address (SONA) earlier this year President Geingob said ancestral land restitution would be discussed at the upcoming conference.

    Also on the agenda would be the willing buyer, willing seller principle; expropriation in the public interest with just compensation, as provided for in the constitution; urban land reform and resettlement criteria and the veterinary cordon fence.

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    Transferring generational wisdomTransferring generational wisdom Justicia Shipena

    I am fairly certain there have been discussions about the deterioration of society for as long as mankind has been able to sit around a fire and communicate.

    The next generation has been the older generation’s scapegoat for thousands of years. The young and rebellious are the ones to be held responsible for the loss of dignity, family values and other signs of society’s cruel demise.

    In an attempt to prevent this inevitable doom, the older generations set out to educate and inform their inheritors, in order to impart to them the vast wisdom that comes with life experience.

    Today, wisdom is passed on through a variety of avenues: Teacher-to-student, mentor-to-mentee, peer-to-peer and friend-to-friend. But perhaps the most formative relationship is that of parent and child.

    Society understands it is the responsibility of parents to familiarise their children with the ways of the world, to help them seek out their place in it and perhaps even to raise children who will preserve their values.

    This is certainly true of my own experience. My parents were my first teachers, and as they are quick to remind me, their lesson plans are far from complete.

    They are good at what they do, and as I have grown up I have often wished that I had kept some kind of running record of the lessons they have taught me - whether those lessons were intentionally conveyed or not.

    About four weeks ago I was sitting in a coffee shop, my eyes glued to my cellphone.

    I came across a blog by Walker Lamond titled ‘Rules for my Unborn Son’.

    In this blog, Lamond has created a kind of movement for imparting wisdom. Since the beginning of the blog he has posted 485 rules and compiled them into a book.

    The blog provides a collection of rules for “raising a thoughtful, adventurous, honest, hardworking, self-reliant, well-dressed, well-read and a well-mannered young gentleman”.

    In short, I would call it a tall order.

    An additional sentimental sucker punch is learning that Lamond started jotting down ideas for his rules after his father passed away. He began the project in earnest when he was waiting for the birth of his own son.

    In my view it is unsurprising that many of Lamond’s rules are distinctly of the ‘father-to-son’ variety.

    Number 49: ‘Call your mom’; number 36: ‘If you absolutely have to fight, punch first and punch hard’ and number 22: ‘Girls like boys who shower’.

    But there are also plenty of cautions to be found in the seemingly limitless stream of parental rebukes. Timeless classics include rule Number 3: ‘When shaking hands, grip firmly and look him in the eye’, while number 169 says: ‘Be nice to your sister. You are her confidante, cheerleader, and bodyguard’.

    There is also salient advice in number 16: ‘You are what you do, not what you say’ and my favourite is number 261: ‘Admit you are wrong. Be convincing’.

    Despite the often negative implications that comes with the word ‘rules’ (unfair, limiting and inconvenient), Lamond’s blog is far from a tedious series of mini-lectures.

    Instead it reads like one man’s attempt to document everything others has taught him and what he has learned on his own, and then manufacturing those lessons into something manageable and entertaining.

    And it is very entertaining. He offers jokes with ironic humour and openness. The entries are often widespread, with supplementary songs (dubbed ‘required listening’ by the author) and also includes photos and quotes from the wise and famous. In this sense, the blog doubles as a kind of crash course in culture.

    Perhaps best of all, the blog is open to suggestions. Readers are encouraged to submit their own maxims. This contributes to the feeling that while the project started as something rather personal, it has evolved into an engaging, collaborative forum for people to share their life lessons.

    It does not bother me that Lamond is yet to release a set of rules for his daughter. I find the vast majority of his rules to be entirely applicable to my own life. I am also anxiously waiting for someone to set out rules for their daughter and I know for sure it will benefit me and many of my peers.

    For instance, Lamond’s rules that prove particularly relevant for college students are gems like number 384: ‘All drinking challenges must be accepted’; number 375: ‘Don’t pose with booze’ and number 99: ‘Nothing good ever happens after 3am, I promise’.

    And finally number 252: ‘If you attend a late night after-party, have exit strategies’.

    It’s safe to say that nearly everyone’s first college year could have benefitted from those pieces of advice.

    Lamond’s rules are doing the older generation proud and the range of subject matter he covers is impressive and speaks to the larger idea that as a parent, your primary motivation is often to protect your child; to save him or her from hurt, from embarrassment and from an often daunting world.

    “Lamond is covering all the bases. That’s what being a parent all is about,” my dad said, when I mentioned I would be writing this column.

    “A sun tan is earned, never bought.”

    That’s rule number 434, by the way.

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    Return all skulls before reparationsReturn all skulls before reparationsNeed proper burial Swapo MP Ida Hoffmann says the human remains still in Germany or elsewhere should be repatriated en masse. Founder of the Nama genocide discussion and chairperson of the Nama Genocide Technical Committee, Ida Hoffmann, says all human remains of Namibian origin still in Germany must be returned before talks of reparations can be done.

    “The matter we are dealing with is a holy case. For us it is a sacred and noble cause and must be handled with dignity and respect. Our ancestors will never be able to speak on their own behalf. We are their voices and whatever we do must be done with honesty,” Hoffmann said.

    Hoffmann is referring to a recent statement reportedly made by the German special envoy for the genocide negotiations, Ruprecht Polenz, who said that the next restitution of 22 skulls of Namibian origin Germany to Namibia will be in late August.

    She said there are many more skulls in Germany that ought to be returned.

    The first consignment of 20 skulls were returned in October 2011 and in March 2012 a further 35 skulls were repatriated.

    She said there are still 14 skulls at the University of Freiburg, which were ready for repatriation already in 2011.

    Another three skulls were identified at the University of Freifswald and another at the Focke-Museum in Bremen.

    Hoffmann said there are also skulls in Hamburg, Frankfurt and in the United States of America.

    “Why are the Namibian remains being brought back bit by bit?” questioned Hoffmann.

    She reiterated that all human remains must be returned before any real discussions about reparations can be done.

    “Customarily, you never discuss heirlooms when the body is still in the mortuary. Our ancestors' bodies are still in the mortuaries of universities and museums. This is disrespectful towards our ancestors who need a proper burial,” Hoffmann said.

    She said whatever reparations the German government might agree to pay will be the heirloom of the Ovaherero and Nama.

    She bemoaned the fact that there have not been any formal burials of the human remains except the 24 bags of bones retrieved by the Roads Construction Company (RCC) on road works in southern Namibia and buried in 11 coffins by Hoffman and the late chief Dawid Fredericks with no assistance from the government or other traditional authorities.

    Hoffmann said a number of bones have also been identified at Charlonton Bay near Lüderitz that have yet to be collected and treated with due respect.

    “What game is the Namibian government playing? Why are the human remains, accompanying documents and the Witbooi bible, which is in the Linden Museum in Stuttgard, not returned? Is the government postponing matters?” Hoffmann asked.

    Catherine Sasman

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: A huge stink
  • A huge stinkA huge stink Thousands of Namibians continue to bear the brunt of poor water and sanitation services, rampant in most parts of our country. Almost every town finds itself confronted by this challenge, which has mostly been left to spiral out of control. The need for proper sanitation infrastructure in our communities cannot be overemphasised. In fact, in 2015 the United Nations declared sanitation a universal human right. However, as a nation we are still struggling to cope with our sanitation problems, especially when it comes to the most vulnerable citizens of our society. The situation on the ground is so dire, to the extent that thousands of our people still practice open defecation. It must be noted that the absence of adequate sanitation has a serious impact on the health of children and the elderly, who are exposed to such utterly unhygienic conditions. This has given rise to the transmission of diseases such as cholera, diarrhoea, hepatitis E and polio, among others. Since last year the authorities have been hard at work trying to contain a hepatitis E outbreak in Windhoek that has claimed 17 lives so far. The outbreak has also spread to the Omusati and Erongo regions in the process, thus putting thousands of lives at risk. Again this outbreak has been fuelled by a lack of proper sanitation in informal settlements and government must be called out for a lack of investment in sanitation services for the poor and downtrodden members of our society. Building sanitation capacity should be given higher priority in our country, given the high levels of inequality still prevalent across Namibia. Equally important, government and its partners must adopt a proactive approach to address this crisis, before things get more out of hand. Tackling poor sanitation and ensuring clean water access for all our citizens should definitely be considered a priority at this stage, and not an afterthought.

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    NamBrew remains sure bet in first half-yearNamBrew remains sure bet in first half-yearLocal Index up 3.4% in six months Nearly N$6 billion worth of shares were traded on the Namibian Stock Exchange in the first two quarters of 2018. Jo-Maré Duddy – Namibia Breweries has emerged as the star on the Local Index of the Namibian Stock Exchange (NSX) during the first six months of 2018, with the company ending June 15.3% higher than it started off the year.

    NamBrew ended June at N$44.98 a share, N$5.96 a piece higher than its opening price for 2018. Compared to the end of June 2017, NamBrew’s share price has climbed by N$11.67 or about 35%.

    Only three of the ten companies listed on the Local Index ended June on a higher note than it kicked off the new year. Letshego Holdings Namibia is up 0.25% or 1c, while Nimbus Infrastructure’s share price boasted an increase of 4.86% or 51c a piece. Nimbus listed as the first capital pool company (CPC) on the NSX last October, and was reclassified as part of the Main Board on 29 June.

    Losers

    Namibia Asset Management (NAM) is the biggest loser on the Local Index so far this year. It started 2018 at 72c a share. By the end of June, it was 11.1% down to 64c a piece.

    Nictus Holdings Namibia shed 4.76% to end the first half-year 9c a share lower at N$1.80. Capricorn Investment Group was 77c or 4.28% lower at N$17.23, while FNB Namibia Holdings dropped N$1.65 or 3.54% per share. Oryx Properties ended June at N$20.20 per share, a decrease of 39c or 1.89% compared to the beginning of January. Bidvest Namibia lost 6c or 0.77% to end the first six months of the year at N$7.78 per share.

    The preferential shares of Stimulus Investments remained flat at N$121.29 a piece.

    Trading

    About N$103 million worth of shares in total were traded on the Local Index during the second quarter, bringing the total for the first half-year to some N$377 million. During the first six months of 2017, total trade of about N$358 million was recorded, of which approximately N$100 million was in the second quarter.

    Moneywise, FNB Namibia clinched the bulk of trade during the past quarter, with nearly N$53.56 million worth of shares in total changing hands. This was followed by Oryx with total trade of nearly N$25.71 million.

    Other companies’ total trade during the quarter under review was: NamBrew (nearly N$11.96 million); Capricorn (N$5.03 million); Stimulus (N$3.28 million); Letshego Namibia (N$1.89 million); Bidvest Namibia (N$1.18 million); Nimbus (N$384 900) and NAM (N$16 695).

    On the Overall Index of the NSX, total trade during the first half-year of 2018 amounted to about N$5.9 billion. Of this, some N$2.8 billion was during the past quarter. During the first six months of 2017, shares worth about N$8.9 billion in total were traded on the Overall Index, with some N$5.6 billion recorded in the second quarter.

    The Local Index ended June at 619.96 points, up 20.31 points or 3.39% since the beginning of the year. Compared to the end of June 2017, the index gained 49.56 points or 8.69%.

    The Overall Index ended the second quarter at 1 283.68 points, down 15.99 points or 1.2% from the beginning of 2018. Compared to the end of June 2017, the index gained 270.17 points or 26.7%.

    By comparison, the JSE All Share Index retreated 3.2% so far this year, while it is up 11.6% from the end of June 2017.

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: Totem
  • TotemTotem Quote of the day

    We are obsessed with sustainability and therefore we do not practise inclusivity on the strength of envisaged legislation, but rather because we believe it is the right thing to do. – Gys Joubert, MD: Gondwana Holdings

    Stat

    N$2.2 billion

    Is the value of boilers imported into Namibia during the first quarter of 2018, boosted by growth with China and the US.

    -Namibia Statistics Agency

    Focus

    Budget

    Deep cut for government stores

    Government has allocated N$1.7 million towards the renovation of government stores and reproductive services in 2018/19.

    -Ministry of Finance

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  • 07/09/18--16:00: Born without arms
  • Born without armsBorn without armsBut Ndeyapo never shies away from hard work Ndeyapo Haufiku does not want anyone's sympathy and has big dreams for her five children. Ndeyapo Haufiku, 42, a resident of Okaandje village in the Ongwediva constituency of the Oshana Region, was born without arms; but this has never stopped her from doing whatever she wants to.

    Haufiku, a single mother of five, said she does not consider herself “disabled”, as the only thing she cannot do is cultivate a mahangu field.

    “I am a very hardworking single woman. I am raising my five children on my own and I do everything for them. Whenever they are returning from school they will find me having already cooked food for them. I wash their clothes and bath them, especially the little ones, and I also make sure the house is clean,” Haufiku said.

    She said the only thing that makes her feel uncomfortable is when people pity her because she does not have arms.

    “I am not disabled. My legs are my arms and I can do a lot of activities that people with arms are not doing. The only thing I do not do is to cultivate the mahangu field, but I can pound mahangu and do other things. I am so thankful to God that he gave me wisdom and strength and that I do not sleep at home and wait for people to help me,” she said

    Haufiku said she is the second eldest of her mother's eight children.

    She attended Eluwa Special School in Ongwediva, where she failed grade 10 in 1995.

    She then came home to stay with her mother, until her death in 2005.

    Haufiku said her mother taught her how to do most household chores and use a hand operated sewing machine.

    “When we grew up as children my siblings used to rely on me to help them with their work. I used to cook for them and do other work,” she said.

    The Oshana regional councillor for the Ongwediva constituency, Andreas Utoni, said his office is aware of Haufiku, but they hardly see her looking for support, unlike other people with disabilities.

    “Haufiku is very hardworking and does not look to government for help all the time. The only time you see her at the office is when she needs her or her children's papers to be signed. She is very good inspiration for other people with disabilities and for those who are not having any disability, but are finding it hard to work for themselves,” Utoni said.

    Haufiku said she is praying to God to bless her children, so they do well in school.

    She wants them to be able to create a better future for themselves.

    She said her eldest child completed grade 12 last year, but did not obtain enough points to be admitted for tertiary studies.









    Her second eldest is in grade 10 and she is also doing well at school.

    Haufiku said she and her five children receive monthly social grants from government, and she is very thankful.

    “The money is okay, but even though it does make a difference, it is not easy, especially when it comes to assisting children with their school needs. Every day they require lunch boxes, they need to look neat and I also have to dress them. I am also thankful to my neighbours. They are so helpful, especially with the mahangu field work. They are always there to help us,” she said.

    ILENI NANDJATO

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