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Tells it All - Namibian Sun

older | 1 | .... | 759 | 760 | (Page 761) | 762 | 763 | .... | 1152 | newer

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    Etosha fence will take ten more years Etosha fence will take ten more years ELLANIE SMIT

    Over the past six years only 112 kilometres of the boundary fence of the Etosha National Park has been upgraded and it will take ten years or more to complete the remaining 712 kilometres.

    The ministry estimates that the construction of the remainder would cost N$419 million at current prices and could create many jobs, says the director of wildlife and national parks, Colgar Sikopo.

    This statement was made by the tourism ministry after a video clip was circulated on social media showing the poor condition of the park fence.

    According to Sikopo, the boundary fence is extremely long, measuring 822 kilometres bordering the Oshikoto, Oshana, Omusati and Kunene regions.

    The existing boundary consists of various types of fences, the predominant one being a game-proof fence. There is also an 80-kilometre-long, 1.2-metre-high stock-proof fence. This fence was erected in the early 1960s and has deteriorated in some areas.

    Since 2012, the ministry has started erecting an electrified, elephant- and predator-proof fence.

    The budget allocations for this exercise have been as follows: N$35 million for 2012/13, N$40 million for 2013/14, N$40 million for N$2014/15, and N$20 million for 2015/16.

    In the financial year 2016/17 an amount of N$29 million was allocated but it was then reduced to N$14.5 million, and in 2017/18 only N$12 million was allocated. For this financial year, N$23.8 million has been allocated.

    Sikopo said at the current rate of work the upgrade of the fence would take another ten years or more.

    Although Etosha has no African buffaloes, which can be carriers of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), the virus is highly contagious in cloven-hoofed animals.

    “We are therefore aware that it is of great importance to ensure that control measures such as the fencing of the park are in place and enforced because any outbreak of this disease among livestock can have a devastating effect on both the livestock and wildlife sector.”

    Anthrax had been reported in Etosha in the past and it was important to keep livestock out of the park to prevent contagion, he said.

    Elephant- and lion-proof fences cost more than N$689 285 per kilometre, which means that the remaining 712 kilometres of fencing will cost the government N$491 million at current prices.

    “We are aware that some parts of the cattle-proof fence are in bad condition as a result of destruction by elephants on a daily basis, especially during the wet season. The most affected area is the northern boundary cattle-proof fence.”

    Sikopo said this fence stretches from where the new fence stops at Aupindi corner to the area west of Onanke to Kleinrivier. This area is impossible to reach from the park during the rainy season. Elephants regularly escape from the park in the area from the Ekuma River, past the Oshigambo River up to Kleinrivier.

    During the dry season surface water in that area becomes too salty for the elephants and they move south and east, deeper into the park.

    However once the rains start and surface water is available, elephant herds move out of the park looking for summer grazing.

    Six staff members stationed at Onanke have to maintain this portion of the fence and are allocated only one government vehicle.

    “It is not possible to bring in more staff to maintain the fence as the other available staff are tasked to attend to issues of wildlife protection and law enforcement given the current levels of poaching of rhinos and elephants, as well as attending to incidents of human-wildlife conflict on a daily basis.”

    Sikopo said it was also unfortunate that the Directorate of Wildlife and National Parks had over 400 vacant positions across the country.

    Budget constraints were another major challenge but the ministry was doing its best to do more with less.

    “We are looking at all possible ways to keep up with the maintenance of the boundary fence of Etosha including moving staff from other duty stations in the country to Etosha,” said Sikopo.

    The ministry urged communities and farmers around Etosha not to panic, as the situation was receiving immediate attention.

    Etosha is one of the largest and oldest national parks in Africa and is Namibia’s number one tourist destination. It is home to 114 large and small mammal species more than 400 recorded bird species, scores of reptiles and even a fish species. The park was proclaimed in 1907 and has a size of 22 935 square kilometres.

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    Jobless nurses turn to GeingobJobless nurses turn to GeingobWant foreigners to cease nursing by 30 July Registered nurses, who remain unemployed due to health ministry budget cuts, say the government has chosen to leave them out in the cold and want foreign nurses to cease their work by 30 July. Unemployed registered Namibian nurses are calling on President Hage Geingob to address their plight, saying the future of the healthcare system is at stake.

    In a media statement issued by the group's spokesperson Junias Shilunga, they expressed their dissatisfaction with health minister Bernhard Haufiku and are calling on Geingob to intervene.

    “The unemployed registered nurses of Namibia hereby express our profound disappointment and disbelief at the manner in which the government is treating us. While it seems to have noted with 'great concern' the conditions in which we have been made to live, the government has chosen to leave us in the cold,” Shilunga said.

    “We are calling the president of the republic, Dr Hage Geingob, to assist and intervene in this matter, which has crippling effects on the future of our healthcare sector in Namibia.”

    In April, Haufiku announced a 6.1% ministry budget cut for the 2018/19 financial year, which has negatively impacted the employment opportunities of hundreds of nurses who were awaiting employment.

    The decision by the health ministry to freeze all nursing posts for the current financial year has seen graduates having to look for alternative means of employment, contrary to what they studied for.

    This week Namibian Sun ran an article about a 42-year-old mother of three, who is a 2018 University of Namibia (Unam) nursing graduate. She has been forced to work as an assistant vendor at the Oshakati Open Market.

    Shilunga also pointed out the recent announcement made by Haufiku that the ministry will be renewing the contracts of foreign nurses is not fair, as it undermines the knowledge gained by Namibian nurses.

    “On 18 May 2018, we learnt with deep shock that Haufiku had made a U-turn to renew and extend the foreign nurses' contracts, whose contracts ended last year. Despite the health ministry indicating last year they will not renew the contracts of foreign nurses, in order to create room for new graduates, government have maintained its position of leaving hundreds of young Namibian nurses on the street,” Shilunga said.

    He added they are giving the foreign nurses until 30 July to cease working, in solidarity, in order for Namibian nursing graduates to be absorbed.

    “This should not be looked at as an anti-Pan-Africanism action, but our brothers and sisters from other countries should understand the situation we are living in, knowing well that nursing is a practice. It is difficult for qualified nurses to spend more than seven months without practice, as this will lead to them forgetting and clinical negligence at work.”

    KENYA KAMBOWE

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    Etosha fence will take ten more years Etosha fence will take ten more years ELLANIE SMIT



    Over the past six years only 112 kilometres of the boundary fence of the Etosha National Park has been upgraded and it will take ten years or more to complete the remaining 712 kilometres.

    The ministry estimates that the construction of the remainder would cost N$419 million at current prices and could create many jobs, says the director of wildlife and national parks, Colgar Sikopo.

    This statement was made by the tourism ministry after a video clip was circulated on social media showing the poor condition of the park fence.

    According to Sikopo, the boundary fence is extremely long, measuring 822 kilometres bordering the Oshikoto, Oshana, Omusati and Kunene regions.

    The existing boundary consists of various types of fences, the predominant one being a game-proof fence. There is also an 80-kilometre-long, 1.2-metre-high stock-proof fence. This fence was erected in the early 1960s and has deteriorated in some areas.

    Since 2012, the ministry has started erecting an electrified, elephant- and predator-proof fence.

    The budget allocations for this exercise have been as follows: N$35 million for 2012/13, N$40 million for 2013/2014, N$40 million for N$2014/15, and N$20 million for 2015/2016.

    In the financial year 2016/17 an amount of N$29 million was allocated but it was then reduced to N$14.5 million, and in 2017/18 only N$12 million was allocated. For this financial year, N$23.8 million has been allocated.

    Sikopo said at the current rate of work the upgrade of the fence would take another ten years or more.

    Although Etosha has no African buffaloes, which can be carriers of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), the virus is highly contagious in cloven-hoofed animals.

    “We are therefore aware that it is of great importance to ensure that control measures such as the fencing of the park are in place and enforced because any outbreak of this disease among livestock can have a devastating effect on both the livestock and wildlife sector.”

    Anthrax had been reported in Etosha in the past and it was important to keep livestock out of the park to prevent contagion, he said.

    Elephant- and lion-proof fences cost more than N$689 285 per kilometre, which means that the remaining 712 kilometres of fencing will cost the government N$491 million at current prices.

    “We are aware that some parts of the cattle-proof fence are in bad condition as a result of destruction by elephants on a daily basis, especially during the wet season. The most affected area is the northern boundary cattle-proof fence.”

    Sikopo said this fence stretches from where the new fence stops at Aupindi corner to the area west of Onanke to Kleinrivier. This area is impossible to reach from the park during the rainy season. Elephants regularly escape from the park in the area from the Ekuma River, past the Oshigambo River up to Kleinrivier.

    During the dry season surface water in that area becomes too salty for the elephants and they move south and east, deeper into the park.

    However once the rains start and surface water is available, elephant herds move out of the park looking for summer grazing.

    Six staff members stationed at Onanke have to maintain this portion of the fence and are allocated only one government vehicle.

    “It is not possible to bring in more staff to maintain the fence as the other available staff are tasked to attend to issues of wildlife protection and law enforcement given the current levels of poaching of rhinos and elephants, as well as attending to incidents of human-wildlife conflict on a daily basis.”

    Sikopo said it was also unfortunate that the Directorate of Wildlife and National Parks had over 400 vacant positions across the country.

    Budget constraints were another major challenge but the ministry was doing its best to do more with less.

    “We are looking at all possible ways to keep up with the maintenance of the boundary fence of Etosha including moving staff from other duty stations in the country to Etosha,” said Sikopo.

    The ministry urged communities and farmers around Etosha not to panic, as the situation was receiving immediate attention.

    Etosha is one of the largest and oldest national parks in Africa and is Namibia’s number one tourist destination. It is home to 114 large and small mammal species more than 400 recorded bird species, scores of reptiles and even a fish species. The park was proclaimed in 1907 and has a size of 22 935 square kilometres.

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  • 05/31/18--16:00: Meet Afrox’s rising star
  • Meet Afrox’s rising starMeet Afrox’s rising starShelva-Lee Markowitz is the procurement officer at Afrox Namibia. She delivers services across the country and offers limitless opportunities to those who are curious about the company. Gabby Tjiroze

    Her job is basically buying and enquiring about services and goods for the Afrox Namibia branch.

    “Currently I am a one-man show, doing the work in my department countrywide. I enjoy negotiating and partnering with customers and suppliers. The opportunities granted to me has allowed me to expand my skills and grow professionally,” says Shelva-Lee.

    She joined Afrox in 2010 as a sales representative and then moved into a supervisory level within the sales department. She later worked her way up and rose to become a procurement officer a year after serving as sales supervisor.

    She shared some of her biggest challenges.

    “The lack of urgency that we experience in Namibia really puts one behind, and it is quite stressful, especially if you are a fast worker and have deadlines to be meet. I really hope we relook those policies to understand customer service, as service providers in the country,” she said.

    Shelva-Lee, who holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree obtained from the Management College of Southern Africa, says she sees herself as a go-getter and is never afraid to take on tasks.

    “I am not afraid to ask questions and take on new challenges, and I see a lot of my peers are afraid, because they feel they will be seen as dumb or nagging. The only way to learn is to ask questions. The world that we live in today requires one to ask, as technology evolves,” she says.

    A say in the office

    “Being the only representative in charge of procurement for a country usually requires a lot of mail checking. I get thousands of mails; replying and meeting people, suppliers and vendors,” Shelva-Lee explains.

    She also spoke enthusiastically about what young people could gain by choosing the right career path.

    “You should stay committed to your dreams and focus; no success comes easy. It takes hard work, commitment and determination.”

    She plans to further her studies and get her MBA and also move up the ranks and expand her horizons, by representing Afrox at a continental level.

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  • 05/31/18--16:00: A mother first, then a poet
  • A mother first, then a poetA mother first, then a poet Elizabeth Joseph

    Careers spoke to Elmarie Lewis, office supervisor for Spar Namibia, about her ideas on how to stay proactive and deliver exceptional results.

    Before stepping into this position, Lewis was a part of various corporate teams. After matriculating from Academia Secondary School in 1997, Lewis started working for a local jewellery store in Windhoek for two years.

    Right after she turned 20, Lewis joined several other companies and worked mostly in the finance departments.

    “I’ve always been numerical and knew that I will be successful in any field, if I set my mind to it,” she says.

    Lewis then decided to broaden her horizons and started working for Kuehne & Nagel, which is a logistics company. She worked there for four years.

    In 2014, Lewis stared working at the Spar Namibia regional office as an office supervisor and has been in the position since.

    Lewis is in charge of all import permits for Spar’s Namibian stores. Adhering to the Namibian constitutional laws, she also deals with all the legislative requirements of the Spar Namibia Group.

    Some of the character traits she says one should have is energy and good numerical skills. She also loves interacting with different people and says she uses every opportunity to learn.

    “One needs to be focused, energetic, numerical, very patient and a people’s person. Your character does not have to define you, it’s how you interact with others.

    Expectations are not created, it’s the mindset of how you want others to treat you,” she says.

    Lewis is inspired by her three children and hopes to provide a stable and secure future for them. “They give me the determination and the strength to put my best foot forward in everything I do.

    “I made subconscious decisions that, whatever I put my mind to, I will achieve. I believe being focused and having a positive mindset will not restrict you from getting what you want and can have,” she adds.

    Short-term goals for Lewis include pursuing motivational speaking, as this has always been her dream. She is also a poet outside of work and hopes to go public with her poetry.

    She has great goals for the company as well. “I love working at the Spar regional office Namibia. We work together not just as a team, but as one big happy family. I believe that we are a successful retail company, not just for the brand name Spar, but because of our passion, entrepreneurial and family values,” she says.

    Lewis enjoys the quiet scenery in the neighbourhood in which her family lives, and uses as much time as she can get to perfect her poetry pieces. She further loves cooking and spending quality time with loved ones.

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  • 05/31/18--16:00: Nudo rift deepens
  • Nudo rift deepensNudo rift deepensRival factions expel each other The two Nudo factions, both claiming to be the legitimate leadership of the party, have suspended each other as party representatives in parliament and local authorities. The National Unity Democratic Organisation's (Nudo's) drama is deepening, as both factions are now suspending each other and it remains unclear who the real leadership is.

    The party's third elective congress ended in chaos last week when one group declared themselves the legitimate leadership of the party. The other group, under the leadership of party president Asser Mbai, insisted the congress never took place.

    Mbai, whose term expired in February, claimed that it was extended until a congress could be held.

    At a media briefing yesterday Mbai announced the suspension of five party leaders, including Esther Muinjangue and Josef Kauandenge.

    He added that Kauandenge and two other local authority councillors were recalled from the Windhoek, Swakopmund and Okakarara local authorities pending investigations.

    That, he said, had been resolved at a national executive committee meeting held on Wednesday.

    “The meeting resolved to take disciplinary measures against party members who misbehaved during and after the congress as provided for in the party code of conduct,” said Mbai.

    He added the chaotic congress cost the party N$500 000, and they would have to seek a bank loan to pay for the next congress.

    Shortly afterwards Kauandenge and Muinjangue issued a parallel statement announcing the suspension of Mbai and Meundju Jahanika as members of parliament.

    Muinjangue laughed off Mbai's announcement and said he had no power to suspend them.

    In a joint statement issued by her and Kauandenge, they said they were the legitimate leaders of the party following the congress resolution over the weekend.

    “Under their leadership this party has lost over N$500 000 that disappeared under their watch which they haven't accounted for yet, and hence we will also call upon the Anti-Corruption Commission to investigate this case,” the statement said. The group indicated that the National Assembly would soon be informed of their decision.





    JEMIMA BEUKES

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    Get a true taste of Namibia Get a true taste of Namibia Leonard gives in-depth knowledge of guiding Leonard Vehonga Kandjiriomuini, who started out as a tour bus driver, takes us through his journey in the tourism industry - his trials, tribulations and the perks of being a tour guide and a safari specialist. Gabby Tjiroze





    Leonard Vehonga Kandjiriomuini, who has been in the tourism industry for more than 20 years, is the owner of Ombaue Tours & Safaris. He says the industry has evolved and has become one of the biggest contributors to the GDP in the country.

    “When I started, the industry was still small and new, so there was basically nothing happening, but as I see today the number of visitors has significantly grown over the years and every part of the country has become an attraction, whereas in the earlier days it was just Etosha, Swakopmund etc.,” said Kandjiriomuini.

    He described how he always wanted to be in the tourism industry.

    “As a young boy I was always fascinated by nature. Whenever we headed to the village, I’d always be captivated by trees, rocks or anything outstanding, I used to know all the trees in my village, and so whenever I was on the road, I’d always explain to my siblings what tree a specific tree was and what its purpose is. And now I am fully into the industry and loving it,” he said.

    An ideal guide should have limitless knowledge of their environment and ecology.

    “It has been always enjoyable and there are always so many new things to learn; it is an interesting field, to tell people about your country. Being a guide, has allowed me to unconsciously search for moments that left me feeling amazed with unforgettable experiences. Before I tour, I always do extensive research about a place and its historical background etc. You can never say you know everything because every day you learn something new. It requires one to read and know more about your country, because sometimes a tourist will ask you a question you least expect, so it’s always better to be in the loop,” said the safari specialist.

    His experience

    Kandjiriomuini started working as a tour bus driver in 1997 at SWA Safaris, where he was employed for about six months.

    He then relocated to the south and worked for Wolwedans Lodge as a field guide, where he led small group of tourists into the field and showed them prominent natural resources in the south. Later on he wanted to expand his skills and expertise, so he moved back to Windhoek. He worked for Trans Namibia Tours, (later known as Oryx Tours) as a tour guide from 1999 until 2000. He then worked as a senior tour guide at African Extravaganza until 2006. He became an independent guide and developed his clientele, although it wasn’t an easy ride.

    “In 2006, as I was touring one day, it just hit me that I needed to do this on a part-time basis and that’s when I went into freelancing. It was no walk in the park when I started, because I had to create a clientele plus do administration work, so all this was new to me and I had trouble functioning. I could go for months without a trip and that meant no bread on the table,” he said.

    As the years went by, he later took up the further challenge and opened his own tour company -Ombaue Tours and Safaris - in 2009. He took the name from his homestead village in Epukiro in Omaheke Region. It means ‘a rock’. His company mostly specialises in small groups of travellers and tailor-made tours.

    “By the time I opened up Ombaue Tours, I had developed a contact base. At first business was good and I got tours, but later, with the economic crunch, it really hit the business hard. I specialise in small groups of travellers and tailor-made tours, which essentially gives a group what they want for seven to eight days.

    “When I freelance, I mostly do big tours where I work with two to 40 people on big busses. When I started touring, I only toured Namibia and later southern Africa. I then expanded my horizons and tried something new. I have toured Ethiopia since last year. That was my best experience, learning about a country far from yours, and if you love your job it is always the best thing to do. I love nature and so on,” he explained.

    Educational journey

    Kandjiriomuini enrolled at the Namibia First Aid Training School in 2008 for a First Aid Course certificate and also did a two-year course at the Namibia Academy for Tourism and Hospitality (NATH), he completed a tour guiding course and obtained a Badge 3 certificate. He matriculated from Dawid Bezuidenhout High School.

    Hiccups on the road

    “One of the biggest challenges I experience is marketing the business to an international audience. As a small to medium enterprise, this type of industry relies mostly on tourists and then you have to set up agents in certain countries and that requires money, which is a huge challenge,” said Kandjiriomuini.

    In 2012, he attended the roadshow organised by the Namibia Tourism Board in United Kingdom, and also attended the Tourism Indaba in Durban in 2013, where he marketed his business internationally.

    He pleaded with the ministries of home affairs and tourism to think of ways to train immigration and customs officials in service delivery.

    “Most tourists complain about rude officials at the airport or hotel where they are booked in. And whenever this happens the tourists blame you for everything and it also affects the flow of business, as they think we are not hospitable. These are everyday stories that I have to deal with. If the ministry could give training to the officials about service delivery to tourists, it would make each and everyone’s job very easy. Mostly tourists come here to explore the country and not to be exploited,” he added.

    “As a guide you have to learn and understand your tourists, be polite and patient. Tourists are very interesting people and they always make sure they play their part by being friendly. They end up becoming your family; because imagine being on a tour for about 20 days, you get to know their ups and downs.”

    Kandjiriomuini, who is passionate about his country, further advised Namibians to develop a culture of travelling.

    “Namibia is a beautiful country with so many lovely places to see, but our people do not show interest in touring the country; our visitors know more about our country. If someone would want to explore Namibia to the core, I would recommend Sossusvlei. I think it sticks out because it is so unique and is possibly Namibia’s best known attraction. The largest red dunes that surround it are white, and the clay pan is what stands out. The dunes are the highest in the world. Who wouldn’t want to see that?”



    Kandjiriomuini is currently on a tour in Damaraland at Vingerklip Lodge, with a group of 22 tourists from China.

    Free time

    When he’s not touring he is home with his wife and three children. He’s also a farmer and enjoys going to horse racing and watching news.

    Besides being a tour guide, he is also a philanthropist; he has built a small nursery school at his homestead to help the San children with basic education.

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    5 Ways to Improve Your Work-Life Balance Today5 Ways to Improve Your Work-Life Balance Today 1. Know that there is no 'perfect' balance.

    Don't strive for the perfect schedule; strive for a realistic one. Some days, you might focus more on work, while others you might have more time and energy to pursue your hobbies or relax on the couch with your loved ones. Balance is achieved over time, not each day.

    It is important to remain fluid and constantly assess where you are versus your goals and priorities. At times your children may need you, and other times you may need to travel for work; but allowing yourself to remain open to redirecting and assessing your needs on any day is key in finding balance.

    2. Prioritize your health.

    Your overall health should be your main concern. If you've been struggling with anxiety or depression and think therapy would benefit you, fit those sessions into your schedule, even if you have to leave work early or ditch your evening spin class. If you're battling a chronic illness, don't be afraid to call in on rough days. You'll only prevent yourself from getting better, possibly causing you to take more days off in the future.

    3. Make sure you like your job.

    If you hate what you do, you aren't going to be happy, plain and simple. You don't need to love every aspect of your job, but it needs to be exciting enough that you don't dread getting out of bed every single morning.

    4. Don't be afraid to unplug.

    We live in a connected world that never sleeps. Cutting ties with the outside world from time to time allows us to recover from weekly stress and gives us space for other thoughts and

    It's important to take a step back to physically and mentally recharge. If you are surrounded by good people at work, a vacation should be easy to take.

    5. Make time for yourself.

    Whether you take a walk in the park, get a massage or take a hot bath, it's important to always set aside an hour a week to do something for yourself. Additionally, you should focus on surrounding yourself with loved ones rather than making excuses to be alone all week. Just because work keeps you busy doesn't mean that you should neglect personal relationships.

    Realize that no one at your company is going to love you or appreciate you the way your loved ones do. Also remember that everyone is replaceable at work, and no matter how important you think your job is, the company will not miss a beat tomorrow if you are gone.

    www.businessnewsdaily.com

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    Fully equipped NYS irrigation farm lies idleFully equipped NYS irrigation farm lies idle The National Youth Service (NYS) has been accused of not using its farm at Berg Aukas to create jobs for young Namibians.

    The government spent millions on farm implements and an irrigation system, but all this equipment is standing idle.

    The farm is located at Berg Aukas, 15km east of Grootfontein. It was donated to the Namibian government by Goldfields Namibia in 1990, together with the Berg Aukas youth vocational training centre, which used to be an agricultural school.

    In 2008 the youth ministry handed over the farm to the NYS, which was established in 2005.

    A source privy to the ministry's affairs, speaking on condition of anonymity, says the NYS is under-utilising the farm, which is equipped with a sophisticated irrigation system.

    “This farm was very active when it was under the youth ministry. After it was handed over to the NYS nothing much has been happening. The NYS is lacking creativity and innovative ideas that can help the youth,” the source said.

    The source said further the whole farm is geared for food production, with an underground pipeline network distributing water from boreholes. It also has a reservoir holding more than one million litres, which pumps water directly onto the fields.

    The source accused the NYS of not doing anything to create jobs for the youth. He said if fully utilised, the farm could create thousands of jobs.

    “The farm has tractors and harvesters for various farming activities.

    Most of the equipment is new, as some was bought in 2003 and others were bought in 2008 when the farm was handed over. There is no reason for the NYS not to fully utilise the farm.



    “These tools and equipment were bought with state money to be used at the farm to create employment for the Namibian youth, however they are just standing there and some of them were never used since they were bought in 2008,” the source said.



    When Namibian Sun visited the farm last month, less than a hectare was being cultivated. Staff at the farm said there were fewer than ten employees and only a small piece of land was used to produce maize, watermelons and vegetables such as spinach, cabbage, onions and green peppers.



    They said there is an unused piggery which could hold more than 200 pigs. They said the piggery had never been used since it was set up.



    The NYS is a youth development service institution, established by the National Youth Service Act of 2005.



    Its objectives are to train young people, involve them in national development efforts, encourage youth volunteerism, and facilitate youth contribution to socio-economic development, poverty alleviation and national food security.



    Efforts to get comment from the NYS failed, as its spokesperson, Johanna Kambala, could not respond to the enquiries.

    ILENI NANDJATO

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  • 05/31/18--16:00: Deadbeat opposition
  • Deadbeat oppositionDeadbeat oppositionDespite Swapo disunity, no challenger on the horizon Even as Swapo battles disunity following a bruising elective congress last year and ongoing attacks on the Harambee gospel by its estranged former youth leaders, opposition parties are still unable to make any inroads. Namibia's opposition parties are once again expected to fight it out for the crumbs from the main table when election 2019 rolls around.

    This is according to political analysts, who continue to monitor the state of the ailing opposition in the country, as parties stumble from one crisis to another.

    This is despite Swapo being in the throes of a massive hangover following its 2012 and 2017 elective congresses, where two factions went at each other tooth and nail, and the aftermath included the firing of Team Swapo faction leaders Jerry Ekandjo and Pendukeni Iivula-Ithana from President Hage Geingob's cabinet.

    Irrespective of the Swapo turmoil, experts believe the ruling party's road to the victory in the 2019 parliamentary and presidential elections is all but sealed, due to the mediocre state of opposition politics in Namibia.

    Social and political commentator Uazuva Kaumbi believes the chaotic elective congress held by the National Unity Democratic Organisation (Nudo) this past weekend, the power tussle that has crippled the former official opposition the Rally for Democracy and Progress (RDP) and the money woes and infighting in the Workers' Revolutionary Party are adding insult to injury.

    The former official opposition party, the Congress for Democrats (CoD), has over the past five years also drifted into complete oblivion and barely exists, after being dogged by several court cases involving leadership disputes.

    The current official opposition, the Popular Democratic Movement (PDM), which is trying to shed its apartheid-linked history as the DTA, also faces an uphill battle as it attempts to build on the 2014 general election results.

    In the 2014 presidential poll, Geingob, who will again be the Swapo candidate, after his Team Harambee faction decimated Team Swapo in the ruling party's November congress last year, won a mammoth 86.73% of the votes on offer. His tally of votes ended on 772 528.

    In a distant second place was the PDM's McHenry Venaani, who garnered 44 271 votes, or 4.97%

    The late Hidipo Hamutenya, who was still with the RDP at that stage, before returning to Swapo received a measly 30 197 votes or 3.39%.

    Nudo's candidate Asser Mbai received 16 740 votes, while the rest of the presidential candidates results make for even more woeful reading.

    In the parliamentary elections, Swapo received 80%, tallying 715 026 votes, while the opposition battled it out for the rest of the crumbs.

    Kaumbi said the last thing Namibia's already frail political opposition needs at this point is leadership squabbles and infighting, which will result in parties posing no threat to Swapo's hold onto power.

    “Unfortunately the chaos that is so supreme in opposition parties must be properly analysed to see what the causes are. What needs to be done is to find out what drives it. Is it the salary of being in parliament, because that is what it looks like from the outside? I have not seen a statement from the opposition on what solutions they are going to bring if they are elected,” he said.

    Another political commentator Ndumba Kamwanyah echoed Kaumbi's sentiments, saying the opposition in Namibia is weak and struggling to get anywhere near claiming power.

    “Of course we must be careful not to generalise, as the PDM is more organised, but in general parties are struggling. We also see that when people lose out on a position they are retreating and using ethnicity to drive their power-hungry agendas. There is clearly very little drive for ideology and it is more about power,” he said.

    According to Kamwanyah many opposition parties have been very quiet over the years and many have forgotten about them.

    He said they should therefore reintroduce themselves before next year's election.

    “At a time like this they must clean their houses and address these factional politics, which causes more divisions, because if they don't then they will be disappointed miserably during the elections next year,” he said.

    Kamwanyah also believes that most opposition parties are tribally-orientated which makes it difficult for them to garner support in other communities.

    He believes the time has come for opposition parties to penetrate other communities and not only to concentrate on their strongholds.



    Coalition moves

    Venaani said he has already began rolled out the PDM's election campaign and is hopeful that his coalition outreaches will be successful.

    Following a visit to Kenya in 2016 by the PDM, Nudo and the United Democratic Front (UDF), the parties announced they were looking at the feasibility of forming a coalition to contest next year's elections.

    A commission has been created, but the negotiations are going very slowly, according to Venaani.

    He, however, said he is hopeful the talks it will indeed pay off, adding he has been working with political parties individually and in groups to popularise the coalition idea.

    “There are some minor differences but it is not fundamental differences. It is the most logical thing to do, because some parties will not even survive at the polls. But PDM believes deals must be struck as early as possible,” said Venaani.

    He added his party is in full election mode and has already started printing promotional material.

    Political commentator Hoze Riruako said while divisions are not visible from outside, the ruling party must urgently deal with brewing internal tensions.

    He believes there is a need for the Swapo's top management to massage these undercurrents, in order to make sure it will not impact next year's elections.

    “The divisions, as they now are, are not too visible, but there is something brewing. It is so important for Swapo to manage divergent opinions now. No doubt, the firing of party stalwarts will have an impact on the party. But the top management need to deal with it now, after all 2019 is just around the corner. It cannot be left until the last minute,” Riruako added.

    JEMIMA BEUKES

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    Valombola not a danger to public safety - magistrateValombola not a danger to public safety - magistrate Commissioner for refugees Likius Valombola has been released on N$15 000 bail by the Windhoek Magistrate's Court following his re-arrest for allegedly shooting and killing a youth leader in an apparent road rage incident.

    Valombola, the state had argued this week, is a flight risk and may abscond if granted bail.

    However, Magistrate Antonious Shapumba ruled yesterday that Valombola be released, adding there no evidence to sway the court to believe he is a violent person or that he is danger to public safety.

    According to the magistrate the accused denied being the aggressor during the incident.

    “The accused has the right to liberty and his continued custody prejudices that right,” Shapumba said.

    Turning to the evidence of the police, the magistrate said for most of the part, it is “unreliable and contradictory”.

    Valombola is alleged to have shot 27-year-old Helao Ndjaba - a former Namibia National Students Organisation (Nanso) national executive committee member - on May 19 in Katutura.

    The 53-year-old home affairs official was re-arrested in Opuwo on 23 May after he was suspiciously released on a warning a few hours after the shooting, allegedly without appearing before a magistrate.

    Ndjaba was shot twice in the forehead.

    Shapumba said the Ndjaba family had objected to bail and maintained the victim was a young entrepreneur, who owned a printing business.

    He was the only breadwinner for his siblings.

    However, the magistrate said the court considers the criminal history of the accused in any pending charges.

    “The court also considers the likelihood of accused absconding, interference with the police investigation, interference with state witnesses and the likelihood of him committing schedule one offences,” Shapumba said.

    He added although Valombola indicated he has relatives in America and Britain, there is no evidence he was or is in contact with them.

    “There is no evidence he attempted or is planning to flee or to abscond from his trial and that he will abandon his family,” Shapumba said.

    He said it is unlikely Valombola will interfere with the police investigation and that he will interfere with state witnesses, as well as endanger the safety of others.

    Shapumba said although there was public interest shown in the matter, through a peaceful demonstration, and the interests of the administration of justice is sufficient to reject bail, there was no petition or memorandum provided to the court as evidence that the release of the accused will undermine those interests.

    According to Valombola, an argument started when Ndjaba and others in a Toyota Corolla blocked the road in Katutura through which his vehicle was supposed to pass, which was driven by his son.

    The boys in the Toyota Corolla approached Valombola's car, allegedly in an aggressive manner, and he claims to have fired shots into the air.

    When he was asked why he did not report the incident to the police he allegedly said: “I was not aware that any of my shots struck someone. I had no intention to shoot and kill anybody.

    Ndjaba died on Monday after spending days on life support at the Katutura hospital intensive care unit (ICU).

    There has been a massive public outcry in the aftermath of the incident, with members of the public accusing the police of favouritism towards Valombola.

    Sisa Namandje represented Valombola, Arrie Husselman was the prosecutor, while Ruth Herunga represented Ndjaba's family.

    FRED GOEIEMAN

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    Operational efficiency favours Stimulus shareholdersOperational efficiency favours Stimulus shareholdersDividend payments up 57% Stimulus Investment Limited yesterday released its financial results for the year ended 28 February 2018, which show a 57% increase in dividends that it attributed to operational efficiencies at its portfolio companies. “Increased focus on investee companies to streamline operations and operational efficiencies is expected to yield positive results.” – Pieter Laubscher, executive director, Stimulus NDAMA NAKASHOLE

    Due to its investee companies’ capability to deliver products and services to their customers in the most cost-effective manner possible while still ensuring the high quality of its products, service and support, Stimulus Investments Limited’s portfolio delivered strong dividend payments.

    Stimulus Investments Limited’s portfolio delivered dividend payments totalling N$50.88 million, the company announced yesterday during the presentation of its financial results for the year ended 28 February 2018.

    The private equity investment company, which focuses on acquiring interests in established, high-cash-yielding businesses, last year paid out share dividends of N$32.29 million.

    Stimulus executive director Pieter Laubscher said the company’s results should be seen against the background of the economic downturn, and despite these challenges, “the Stimulus portfolio performed well.”

    The strong dividend payments were achieved through continued healthy dividend payments by investee companies as well as the sale of the Joe’s Beerhouse property.

    There was no portfolio growth in terms of independent valuations, which the company says is reflective of the tough economic environment and commensurate effect on company earnings.

    High dividend payments combined with negligible portfolio growth resulted in the reduction of net asset value per share to N$133.52 (N$141.78 in 2017).

    Total return on the Stimulus portfolio stood at 3.44%, which Stimulus chief executive officer Josephat Mwatotele described as “flat growth”. The company’s return on portfolio was 10.90% last year.

    The company’s uninvested capital halved to 8% due to additional investments made.

    The company says there was a strong focus on operational efficiencies without compromising sustainability of investee companies.

    Environment

    Namene Kalili, the group economist of FNB Namibia, which has ownership in Stimulus, reiterated the weak economy that the year had to put up with. In his presentation, Kalili said while mining, manufacturing, and utilities were among the few sectors that saw positive growth, many other sectors experienced negative growth during the year.

    As much as the economy is growing, the 2018 economic growth is concentrated on specific sectors and Kalili said he does not think it will be felt in the pockets.

    “Imagine if you get a 1% increase for your salary, will you be happy?” he said.

    Although liquidity improved somewhat, the Namibian economy remains in a vulnerable position, according to him, and the outlook in the short-to-medium term remains challenging.

    Beating the tough

    Given the difficult economic conditions, growth in the private sector has been constrained and many of Stimulus’s investee companies have not been immune to the downturn and thus the flat portfolio growth.

    Significantly, the Stimulus team applied its efforts to provide strategic guidance to ensure that each portfolio company was optimally positioned both strategically and operationally, to handle the challenging economic environment in the best possible manner and make them well placed to deliver accelerated results when the economy improves, the company said yesterday.

    “Stimulus has grown from the first Namibian private equity fund to the largest due to the combination of patient capital and an experienced, long-standing management team,” the company said yesterday.

    In 2017, Stimulus deployed additional capital of N$60 million within its portfolio as part of its approach to help investee companies grow their businesses, diversify, unlick value and support their long term strategy.

    “Stimulus remains committed to achieving the best long term outcomes for its businesses and its investors,” it further said.

    Portfolio

    Without going into details due to the individuality of the private companies it has shares in, Laubscher said its two portfolio companies, Plastic Packaging Group and Cymot group, in which Stimulus own 44.58% and 31.46% shares respectively, maintained their Angolan operations on a “wait-and-see basis”.

    “We are cautiously optimistic about these Angolan operations,” he said, adding that they will head to the Angolan factory of the Plastic Packaging Group soon, which focuses on plastic blow-moulding and extrusion. According to Laubscher, Plastic Packaging has renewed focus on Namibian business and it is on a positive group earnings trend.

    Nashua, the office automation supply business, in which Stimulus owns 26% shares, has seen steady growth in the core business.

    With a strong focus on operational efficiencies, Namibia Media Holdings, in which Stimulus owns 100% and 80% of the company’s divisions, was also not spared from the decline in advertising as well as tight competition in printing business.

    Stimulus also owns 47%, 67.7%, 45% and 20% shares in Neo Paints Holdings, Solar Saver, Walvis Bay Stevedoring and Polyoak Namibia respectively.

    Leading

    Despite the fact that the fund’s profit for the year declined to N$4.9 million (N$11.8 in 2017), Stimulus says it expects no meaningful improvement in trading conditions in the next 12 months.

    “Increased focus on investee companies to streamline operations and operational efficiencies is expected to yield positive results,” said Laubscher.

    According to him, the core investment team remains strategically involved since inception and that new appointments will be made as portfolio grows.

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  • 06/03/18--16:00: Under-23s off to China
  • Under-23s off to ChinaUnder-23s off to ChinaDream team chases recognition abroad Namibia's under-23 team will take on China in two friendly matches, which will serve to sharpen their skills ahead of the battle to qualify for the 2019 continental showpiece in Egypt. The national under-23 national football team departed for their week-long tour of China on Friday afternoon, ahead of their two friendly matches against their counterparts.

    The matches are scheduled for on 4 and 7 June and are part of the team's preparations for continental and Olympic qualification.

    With the 2019 African under-23 finals qualifying draw still to be conducted, the Namibia Football Association (NFA) agreed to an invite to China to partake in preparatory games against their Far East friends.

    “The draw is still to be conducted and we have to be ready for anything and hence the importance of this training camp in China. We are grateful for this invite and the boys have been hard at work on the field going through the drills, so that they can leave a mark in China.

    “It will be a learning tour as well and surely the team will enjoy it and play to find the right combinations and see what can work for us before the real business,” said Timo Tjongarero, head coach of the team.

    He adds that the boys want to make a mark for the 2020 qualifiers.

    “In recent years, we won Cosafa at senior and u-17 level and also reached the Chan final quarter-finals.

    This crop of players want to add to those achievements by writing their own history and at least qualifying for the tournament in Egypt after the continental qualifiers,” explained Tjongarero.

    Of the many friendly games the team has played thus far, the notable one was on 19 May, when they defeated the Tertiary Institutes Sports Association of Namibia football (Tisan) team 1-0 thanks to a goal by Israel Shikongo.

    Namibia has to start preparations for their Olympic dream by negotiating past their continental hopefuls, with seven spots available for the eight-team 2019 African tournament to be held in Egypt by November or December 2019.

    The tournament, which will be played in Egypt, will see the top three teams qualifying automatically for the Olympic Games.

    The fourth-placed finisher plays in a play-off against a team from the Asian Football Confederation. Nigeria is the defending champions.



    The following 20 players travelled to China:

    Wisely Kauua, Baloyi Tsandib, Petrus Kamati, Aprocius Petrus, Paulus Abel, Uetuuru Kambato, Giovanni Nauseb, Pandeni Kandjabanga, Israel Shikongo, Hubert Mingeri, Romeo Kasume, Anthony Kham, Romario Hawiseb, Lubeni Haukongo, Calvin Spiegel, Rivaldo Festus, Kennedy //Eib, Brandon Neibeb, McCartney Naweseb and Hiha Katjivena.



    NFA

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    Steenkamp ready for European battlesSteenkamp ready for European battles When Rikenette Steenkamp starts her international campaign today in Prague, Czech Republic, it won't just be about winning 100m hurdles races.

    What the University of Pretoria athlete is looking for in her European campaign is competition urgency. “I won't mind finishing second, third or even fourth as long it is a competitive race.

    “I will be happy as it will prove that I am on track to achieve what I set out to do and that is to be competitive in international athletics,” said the Tuks athlete, who last year became only the second South African athlete to dip under 13 seconds in the 100m hurdles.

    Steenkamp is realistic about her goals. “Last year there was a lot of hype among local athletics fans when I ran 12.99, but in reality, my performance was average when compared to what is happening in international 100m hurdles races. As South African athletes we need to set the bar higher.

    “I fully realise that at the moment I am not capable of running 12.50, but I am capable of getting close to 12.80. I love competition as it brings the best out of me.

    “If I can race against athletes who are consistently able to run 12.80 and faster, I will be in the mix. I might not win at first but my times will improve, and that is what I want.”

    According to the Tuks athlete, her primary goal is to peak at the Athletics World Cup in London (July 14 and 15). Depending on how she feels afterwards she might compete in few more international races later.

    “The most important thing I have learned over the last few years is that quality is more important than quantity.

    “I cannot race as often as other athletes do. It means I have to be selective as to where I want to race. At most I am capable of running six to seven good races in a season.”

    Steenkamp is also looking forward to the African Championships in Nigeria. She is not fazed by the fact that Oluwatobiloba Amusan (Nigeria) won the gold medal at the Commonwealth Games in 12.68.

    “I am happy that she got to run such a good time, but it is not as if she is running 12.60 each time she races. If the winning time is going to be around 12.90 at the championships, I will have a definite chance to medal.”

    Last year Steenkamp competed in five races in Europe winning four of them. The only time she did not win was in Ostrava, but that was her breakthrough race. She finished second in 12.99 dipping under 13 seconds for the first time.

    If it were not for the strong wind from behind Steenkamp would have set a new South African record in the 100m hurdles at the Resisprint international meeting in Switzerland. She won in a time of 12.92 which is 0.02 faster than the record set by Corien Botha in 1998.

    The wind from behind was measured at 2.01m/s which meant it was too strong by 0.01m/s for record purposes.



    NAMPA/ANA

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  • 06/03/18--16:00: Boks blunder to defeat
  • Boks blunder to defeatBoks blunder to defeatLate Wales try destroys SA Rassie Erasmus' tenure as Springbok coach started out in defeat, as his side went down 22-20 to Wales. In international friendly at the Robert F Kennedy Stadium in Washington DC on Saturday evening ended in heartbreak for new Bok coach, Rassie Erasmus.

    Wales led 14-3 at the break, but the Boks clawed their way back into the match to take a 20-17 lead, eight minutes from the end. However, Wales snatched the game with a freak try near the end to regain the lead and hold on for a close-shave win.

    The earlier rains at the venue made for spoiling conditions, as players battled to hold on to the slippery ball. As a result, the teams battled to strike up early cohesion, as movements broke down in what was largely a stop-start affair in the opening 20 minutes.

    The Boks enjoyed the upper hand in the early scrums but were unable to capitalise as the Welsh defence smothered their efforts effectively. Several scrums had to be reset and referee Matthew Carley of England frequently tried to address the matter by briefing the front rows.

    In the 17th minute, Bok flyhalf Elton Jantjies opened the scoring with a 35m penalty, after Wales infringed at breakdown play (3-0).

    Just on the half-hour mark Wales' slick handling inside the Boks' 22m area resulted in a try by fullback Hallam Amos. Flyhalf Gareth Anscombe struck the conversion well from the touchline to give his team a 7-3 lead.

    The Boks' defence was caught napping again four minutes later, when Wales' scrumhalf Tomos Williams slipped two close-in tackling attempts and dived over for his side's second try. Anscombe converted to push the lead out to 14-3.

    For the rest of the half, the Boks enjoyed their fair share of possession, but failed to make headway, mainly because their attacking sorties lacked the variation to open the opposition defence, and the teams changed ends with Wales leading 14-3.

    Early second-half pressure paid dividends for the Boks when right-wing Travis Ismaiel pulled off an intercept inside the Welsh 22m area and raced away for a try. Jantjies converted to reduce the deficit to four points in the 44th minute (14-10).

    Four minutes later, New Zealand-born Anscombe was on target with a penalty to open up a 7-point lead (17-10).

    In the 55th minute, Wales centre Owen Watkin was sin-binned for a professional foul and the Boks made good on their numerical advantage with a converted Makazole Mapimpi try, after a strong scrum from a penalty in front of the posts (17-17).

    The raft of personnel changes in the Boks line-up, which preceded the try by left-wing Mapimpi seemed to inject a fresh sense of urgency in their ranks, and in the ensuing stage of the game, Wales was forced to settle for a largely defensive role in their own half.

    The Boks did enough to go further ahead in the 65th minute, but Wales averted further damage by shoving Ismaiel out at the corner flag.

    A 72nd scrum penalty for the Boks broke the 17-all deadlock as substitute Robert du Preez goaled a penalty for a slender 20-17.

    Wales struck back almost immediately from the restart, when a Du Preez kick from inside his in-goal area was charged down and replacement hooker Ryan Elias was handily placed to dive on the stray ball for a freak unconverted try, which given the late stage of the game, looked like a match-winning touchdown (22-20).

    And that's the way it turned out, as the Boks hashed their last-gasp attempt to save the match by failing to hold on to possession in an attack out wide.

    Scorers: South Africa 20 (3): Tries: Travis Ismaiel, Makazole Mapimpi. Conversions: Elton Jantjies (2) Penalties: Jantjies, Robert du Preez.

    Wales 22 (14): Tries: Hallam Amos, Tomos Williams, Ryan Elias Conversions: Gareth Anscombe (2) Penalty: Anscombe.

    NAMPA/ANA

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    Iilonga yondhalate yEtosha otayi ka kutha oomvula dha thika po10Iilonga yondhalate yEtosha otayi ka kutha oomvula dha thika po10Epangelo otali kondjo mokutula ondhalate kEtosha Muule woomvula hamano dha piti, oshinano owala shookilometa 112, shondhalate yEtosha sha longwa, na otashi ka kutha uule woomvula dhi li pomulongo nenge dhi vulithe po opo ku vule okumanithwa iilonga yoshinano shookilometa 712 ndhoka dha hupako. Uuministeli owa holola kutya iilonga mbyoka ya hupako otayi ka pula oshimaliwa sha thika poomiliyona 419 nokutotapo oompito dhiilonga odhindji, Omukomeho gwoshikondo shiiyamakuti niikunino yiiyamakuti ya gamenwa, Colgar Sikopo, a popi.

    Uuyelele mboka owa pitithwa kuuministeli womatalelepo konima sho kwa li kwa pitithwa okavidio hoka taka ulike onkalo ombwiinayi yondhalate yEtosha. Pahapu dhaSikopo, ondhalate ndjoka onde noonkondo molwaashoka oyuule woshinano shookilometa 822, kombinga yoshitopolwa shaShikoto, Oshana nOmusati, oshowo oshitopolwa shaKunene.

    Odhalate ndjoka otayi adhika noondhalate dha yooloka mwa kwatelwa ndhoka dha nuninwa okuyanda iiyamakuti yi pite mo meni lyoshikunino shoka. Okutameka omvula yo 2012, uuministeli owa tameke tawu tula oshikunino shoka odhalate yolusheno opo oondjamba niiyamakuti yilwe kayi vule okuza mo moshikunino.

    Elongitho lyiimaliwa metulo ko lyondhalate ndjoka okwa hololwa kutya otashi ka pula oomiliyona 35 mo 2012/13, oomiliyona 40 mo2013/14, oomiliyona 40 momvula yo 2014/15, oomiliyona 20 mo 2015/16.

    Momumvo gwoshimaliwa gwo 2016/17 iilonga otayi ka pula oomiliyona 29 andola, ihe omwaalu ngoka ogwa shunithwa pevi poomiliyona 14.5 nomomvula yo 2017/18 oomiliyona 12 odhiikalekelwa. Momumvo gwoshimaliwa nguka tu li, okwiikalekelwa oshimaliwa shoomiliyona 23.8.

    Omunambelewa ngoka okwa tsikile kutya iilonga yondhalate ndjoka otayi ka kutha oomvula 10 nenge dhi vulithe po.

    Nonando Etosha kali na iinamwenyo yoAfrican buffalo, mbyoka hayi humba omukithi gwekondo nelaka ano foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), omukithi ngoka ohagu adhika woo miinamwenyo yilwe mbyoka yi na omakondo.

    Omunambelewa ngoka okwa tsikile kutya oye na owino kutya etulo lyondhalate oshikunino shoka oshinima sha simana noonkondo opo ku kandekwe omikithi dhiinamwenyo ngaashi ngoka gwekondo nelaka, nenge omukithi gwombulwa, ngoka gwa li gwa lopotwa mEtosha oomvula dha piti, na osha li sha simana noonkondo okukaleka iimuna kokule noshikununo shoka opo ku yandwe etaandelo lyomukithi ngoka okuza miiyamakuti okuya miimuna.

    Ondhalate ndjoka hayi keelele iiyamakuti ngaashi oondjamba noonkoshi kadhi gwaye oloogolo ndoka, otayi pula oshimaliwa shooN$689 285 mokilometa yimwe, naashoka otashi holola kutya epangelo otali pumbwa oshimaliwa shoomiliyoan 491, opo li vule okutula ondhalate ndjoka koshinano shookilometa 712 shoka dha hupako.

    Sikopo okwa popi kutya odhalate ndjoka otayi tamekele mpoka pwa hulila ondhalate ndjoka ya tulwa po momudhigolongo gwoAupindi muuzilo wOnanke okuya kKleinrivier. Omudhingoloko ngoka ihagu vulu oku thikwa nuupu okuza moshikunino pethimbo lyomvula. Oondjamba ohadhi yi ontuku okuza moshikunino shoka okuzilila komudhingoloko gwomulonga gwEkuma okupitila momulonga gwaShigambo sigo okoKleinrivier. Pethimbo lyokwenye, omeya gomomudhingoloko ngoka ohaga ningi oshimongwa naashoka ohashi etitha oondjamba dhi ye muumbugantu nuuninginino woshikununi shoka, meni lela lyoshikunino ihe nonando ongaaka ngele omuloka ogwa tameke nena oondjamba ohadhi galuka nokukonga uuhupilo.

    Aaniilonga yahamano oya tulwa mOnanke opo ya vule okulonga odhalate ndjoka na oye na owala oshiyenditho shimwe shepangelo. Omunambelewa ngoka okwa popi kutya itashi vulika opo ya ete omwaalu omunene gwaanambelewa ya longe ondhalate ndjoka molwaashoka aanambelewa oye na iinakugwanithwa yilwe ngaashi egameno lyiiyamakuti miikunino yiiyamakuti oshowo iikumungu yilwe ngaashi yiikolokosha pokati kaantu niiyamakuti.

    Sikopo okwa popi kutya oshikondo shoDirectorate of Wildlife and National Parks oshi na oompito dhiilonga sha thika po 400 moshilongo ashihe, ihe omolwa ompumbwe yiimaliwa neshunitho pevi lyelongitho lyiimaliwa osho shimwe shomiinima tayi yi moshipala iilonga ihe nonando ongaaka otaya ningi shoka taya vulu opo ya kandulepo omaupyakadhi ngoka ga taalela oshikondo shawo, nokulonga ondhalate ndjoka.

    Uuministeli owa pula aanafaalama naakwashigwana mboka yeli popepi nEtosha opo ka ya mbandapale molwaashoka uuministeli owiitulamo mokulonga olugumbo lwoshikunino shoka. Oshikunino shiinamwenyo shEtosha oshimwe shomiikunino iinene muAfrika. Oshi li egumbo kiiyamakuti yomaludhi ga yooloka ya thika po 114 mboka inene oshowo mbyoka iishona yi li pomaludhi 400. Ehala ndyoka olya tseyitha nokuningwa oshikunino mo 1907, na oli na uunene woosquare kilometa 22 935.

    Ellanie Smit

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    Sankwasa ita popile ondilo yelongo lyoondjilaSankwasa ita popile ondilo yelongo lyoondjila AaNamibia oya pulwa opo kondeme nomuthindo iifuta yili pombanda noonkondo mbyoka hayi pulwa melongo lyoondjila moshilongo.

    Omupeha minista moshikondo shomalweendo,

    James Sankwasa okwa nyenyeta kombinga yondilo yelongo lyoondjila moshilongo na okwa popi kutya uuministeli wawo otawu ka tula mopaliamende ontotwaveta tayi ithanwa Construction Industry Bill nuumvo.

    Sankwasa okwa popi ngaaka pethimbo kwa patululwa iilonga yondjila yomamanya yonomola (DR) 3681 ya za mEpato okuya mOtamanzi sigo Onaushe moshitopolwa shaMusati, mEtine lyoshiwike sha piti.

    Sankwasa okwa popi kutyaNamibia ke na olutu ndoka talu kondolola oshikondo shomatungo, naashoka osho tashi etithwa e yo pombanda lyoondondo dhili pombanda moshikondo shiilonga yomatungo.

    “Oomvula hetatu nomulongo dha piti, iilonga yondjila yopamuthika oya li tayi pula oshimaliwa shoomiliyona 3 nenge ne mokilometa, omanga ondjila yomamanya yoshinano sha faathana ya li tayi pula oshimaliwa dhomiliyona 1 nenge mbali ihe ngashiingeyi iilonga mbyoka itayi pula oomiliyona dhili 20 no 30 mokilometa yimwe.”

    Okwa popi kutya yamwe otaya pula nokuli iimaliwa yoomiliyona 40 mokilometa yimwe, nopahapu dhe shoka kashi li mondjila.

    Sankwasa okwa pula kutya nena oondjila ngapi tadhi longwa ngele otaku pulwa omwaalu gwiimaliwa yi li pombanda ngaaka.

    Okwa pula AaNamibia yiimange kumwe nokukwashilipaleka kutya oonzo ndhoka tadhi pewa uuministeli kepangelo oshowo okuza pamwe odha longithwa nawa megandjo lyomayakulo goshigwana, na inaku hepekwa oonzo ndhoka.

    Omunambelewa ngoka natango okwa longitha ompito ndjoka mokutsa omukumo aalongi yoondjila ya longe oondjila dhongushu yiimaliwa mbyoka taya pula, yo ya kwashilipaleke kutya oopoloyeka dhiilonga odha longwa muule ethimbo ndyoka lyuuvathanwa.

    Iilonga yondjila ndjoka yoshinano shookilometa 36.6km Epato-Otamanzi-Onaushe DR 3681 otayi longwa uule woomwedhi 24 kongushu yoshimaliwa shoomiliyona 63.9, na otayi longwa kiiyemo tayi gandjwa kepangelo oshowo ehangano lyaGermany lyoKreditanstalt fur Wiederaufbau (KfW).

    NAMPA

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    Kamseb ta tyapula efudho lye lyowinaKamseb ta tyapula efudho lye lyowinaA tokola okuya muunafaalama konima sho a kuthwa manga miilonga Konima nkene a tulwa mefudho lyowina muKotomba gwo 2016, Omunambelewa gwoChief Regional Officer (CRO) melelo lyoshitopolwa shaKunene onkene ta mono ondjambi ye nomauwanawa ge guudha. George Kamseb natango okuli mefudho lyowina uule woomvula mbali monena, nangashiingeyi okwa tokola okuninga omunafaalama.

    Omunambelewa ngoka ota ningiwa omakonaakono kuuministeli womayambulepo giitopolwa noondolopa. Minista Peya Mushelenga okwa lombwele oNamibian Sun, oshiwike sha piti kutya oya gandja olopota yawo oshowo omagwedhelepo kelelo lyoshitopolwa na oya tegelela eyamukulo.

    “Oshili oshoka kutya otwa ninga omakonaakono kombinga yiikumungu yayooloka melelo lyaKunene na otwa gandja olopota kelelo ndyoka momasiku gaali gaMalitsa opo li ninge omatokolo. Natango otwa tegelela omayamukulo kombinga yomatokolo ngoka ga ningwa. Omakonakono ngoka oga ningwa kongundu yaayalulimambo giiiyemo nongundu ndjoka oya yi yoyene yi ka gandje olopota kelelo lyoshitopolwa,” Mushelenga a popi.

    Ngoloneya gwoshitopolwa shaKunene, Marius Sheya okwa koleke kutya elelo lyoshitopolwa olya yakula olopota ndjoka ihe ina gandja uuyelele kutya omatokolo geni ga kuthwa.

    “Oshikumungu shoka otashi ungaungiwa nasho kiilyo mbyoka yi li oshitopolwa, na itatu vulu okupopya kombinga yoshikumungu shoka miikundaneki. Elelo lyoshitopolwa otali kwatele komeho oshikumungu na otu na omukumo kutya pehulilo otaku ka monika iizemo iiwanawa opo iinima yi kale ngaashi ya kala,” Sheya a popi.

    Kamseb okwa lombwele oNamibian Sun kutya ye ota tyapula efudho lyowina ndyoka a pewa kelelo lyoshitopolwa muKotomba gwo 2016, na okwa yelitha kutya ina kuthwa miilonga.

    Onzo yimwe oya lombwele oNamibian Sun kutya konima sho omakonaaakono ngoka ga manithwa, Kamseb okwa li a pewa elombwelo opo iilopote kiilonga. Okwa tindi okushuna kiilonga omanga ina pewa omatompelo kutya oshike sha li she mu tulitha mefudho. Konima sho a zi miilonga uule womvula noomwedhi heyali, Kamseb okwa ningi omunafaalama okuudha.

    Okwa popi kutya konima sho a thigi po ombelewa ina lombwelwa sha pambaapila kelelo lyoshitopolwa.

    “Inandi tidhwa miilonga ihe onda tulwa mefudho. Onda tegelela natango opo nduuve okuza kuyo, sigo ongashiingeyi itandi longo,” Kamseb a popi.

    Momasiku 19 gaKotomba 2016, elelo lyoshitopolwa shaKunene olya gandja omukanda ngoka gwa pula Kamseb a ye mefudho sigo ongele a lombwelwa a shune miilonga, ihe ekutho lye miilonga olya hololwa koPublic Service Commission (PSC) uule woomwedhi mbali lwanima kutya kali li mondjila.

    Omunashipundi gwoPSC, Marcus Kampungu okwa popi kutya: “Otwa yakula eindilo okuza koshitopolwa shaKunene muNovemba gwo 2016, konima yomwedhi gumwe sho ya kutha nale Kamseb miilonga, otwa tindi eindilo ndyoka. Kutse opo wu kuthe omuntu miilonga na pu kale pe na uumbangi kutya omuntu ngoka ota vulu okuya moshipala omakonaakono, ihe meindilo lyawo ka mwa li uumbangi,” Kampungu a popi.

    Okwa gwedha po kutya oya gandja omayele opo ya ningile Kamseb omakonaakono omanga e li miilonga ihe inaye ya galukila we.

    Kamseb okwa li aniwa a kuthwa miilonga, sho a ndopa okugandja omukanda gwokondalaka ye yiilonga kelelo lyoshitopolwa.



    ILENI NANDJATO

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    Ondando yomahooli tayi londo pombandaOndando yomahooli tayi londo pombanda Ondando yomahooli gopetrol oshowo odiesel okwa tseyithwa kutya otayi londo pombanda noocenta 60 molita mEtitatu lyoshiwike shika.

    Onkundana ndjika oya tseyithwa kOminista yIikwamina nIikwankondo, Tom Alweendo, momukanda gwiikundaneki ngoka gwa pitithwa oshiwike sha piti kutya, ondando yomahooli gopetrol 95 mOmbaye otayi londo pombanda noocenta 60, na otayi ka kala ooN$12.30 molita.

    Ondando yomahooli goDiesel 500 parts per million (ppm) oshowo oDiesel 50 ppm nayo otayi londo pombanda noocenta 60 molita na otayi ka kala pondando yooN$12.63 oshowo N$ 12.68 molita.

    Ondando ndjoka otayi ka kwatelamo woo iifuta yoNamibia Ports Authority oshowo mbyoka yoRoad Fund Administration.

    Minista okwa yelitha kutya e yo pombanda lyondando yomahooli otali etithwa konkalo sho aayeti yomahooli moshilongo haya futu ondando yili pombanda noonkondo okuyeleka nondando ndjoka ya tulwa po kepangelo, mokweeta omahooli meni lyoshilongo.

    Oondando ndhoka hadhi futwa koonakweeta omahooli moshilongo odhili pombanda noonkondo na odho dha hwahwameke ondando yomahooli yi ye pombanda opo ku thitikwe nokukaleka pandondo omwaka ngoka gu li pokati kiifuta mbyoka tayi futwa koonakweeta omahooli moshilongo oshowo iifuta mbyoka ya tulwa po kepangelo.

    NAMPA

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    Welwitschias suffer another defeatWelwitschias suffer another defeatBlue Bulls return to winning ways The Windhoek Draught Welwitschias lost to the Vodacom Blue Bulls in the SuperSport Rugby Challenge on Saturday. The Welwitschias lost 31- 47 to Blue Bulls on Saturday afternoon, after trailing 7-28 at halftime.

    Wing Xolisa Guma scored a brace to help the Bulls return to winning ways at the Hage Geingob Stadium in Windhoek.

    The table could not have been decked any better, as the visitors needed to beat their Namibian opponents, while the Welwitschias had their tails up after dispatching the Hino Valke the previous weekend.

    The men from Pretoria did not have to wait long to trouble the scoreboard, as outside centre Franco Naude touched down in the second minute, with Guma following suit in the 8th minute.

    Fullback Andell Loubser converted both tries.

    The Welwitschias struck back in the 13th minute, with outside centre Johan Tromp crossing the whitewash and flyhalf Pieter Steenkamp's converting.

    But this was the only points they scored during the first half.

    The front-rowers of the Bulls then made their presence felt, as Nqobisizwe Mxoli forced his way over and recent Vodacom Super Rugby debutant Matthys Basson wrapped up the bonus point in the 29th minute.

    Loubser was on target with both his conversion attempts, to give the visitors a commanding 28-7 lead at the break.

    The halftime talk must have been an emotional one for the Welwitschias, as they came out firing in the second half, with replacement utility back Johan Greyling adding a converted try six minutes after the restart.

    Man-of-the-match Jamba Ulengo pulled back a try for the visitors, before the match withered into a series of thwarted attacking attempts by both teams, with replacement hooker Daniel van Vuuren breaking the passage of play with an unconverted try.

    The final 15 minutes exploded into a points-scoring frenzy, as replacement hooker Johan Grobbelaar added his name to the scoresheet for the Bulls and the home team scoring their bonus point try, courtesy of inside centre Darryl de la Harpe.

    Guma got his brace with nine minutes left on the clock, but it was the Welwitschias who had the final say, with flank Rohan Kitshoff scoring a converted try after the whistle.

    However, this was not enough to prevent the Bulls from winning 47-31.



    SCORERS

    Windhoek Draught Welwitschias

    Tries: Johan Tromp, Johan Greyling, Daniel van Vuuren, Darryl de la Harpe and Rohan Kitshoff.

    Conversions: Pieter Steenkamp (3).

    Blue Bulls

    Tries: Franco Naude, Xolisa Guma (2), Nqobisizwe Mxoli, Matthys Basson, Jamba Ulengo and Johan Grobbelaar

    Conversions: Andell Loubser (6).

    -SUPERSPORT

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