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Tells it All - Namibian Sun

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  • 05/02/18--16:00: Next stop, Iran
  • Next stop, IranNext stop, IranIsrael says country has massive nuclear plan Israel appears to be leading an 'assault' on Iran, telling the United States that the country can activate its nuclear weapons at any time. Iran on Tuesday branded Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu an “infamous liar” over his allegations of a secret Iranian nuclear weapons programme.

    Netanyahu's comments came from a “broke and infamous liar who has had nothing to offer except lies and deceits”, foreign ministry spokesperson Bahram Ghasemi said in a statement.

    This came in the wake of comments by Netanyahu who said he had new “proof” of an Iranian nuclear weapons plan that could be activated at any time, as the US considered whether to pull out of the atomic accord with Tehran.

    The documents released by Israel on Monday were “authentic”, according to US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, until last week director of the CIA.

    As he returned from a trip to meet Netanyahu, Pompeo said much of the information they contained was new to American experts.

    In an elaborate televised presentation that included props, video and slides, Netanyahu accused Iran of lying about its nuclear ambitions, but he did not provide evidence that Israel's main enemy had actively worked to obtain an atomic weapon since the 2015 agreement between Tehran and six world powers.

    Iran has always denied it sought a nuclear weapon, insisting its atomic programme was for civilian purposes.



    Deal deadline

    Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif reacted to the latest claims by lambasting both Netanyahu and US President Donald Trump, who has a May 12 deadline to decide whether to walk away from the nuclear deal.

    Trump reiterated his aversion to the “horrible” deal, highlighting provisions in the agreement restricting Iran's nuclear activities that begin expiring in 2025.

    “In seven years, that deal will have expired and Iran is free to go ahead and create nuclear weapons,” Trump told a joint press conference with his Nigerian counterpart Muhammadu Buhari.

    While most world powers say the deal is working as intended for now and is the best way to keep Iran from acquiring the bomb, Trump has been threatening to pull out for months.

    Netanyahu, speaking in Tel Aviv, said Israel had recently obtained tens of thousands of files in a “great intelligence achievement”, saying they had been moved to a secret compound in Tehran in 2017 that looked dilapidated from the outside.

    The material obtained weighed a half a ton, he said, speaking in the staged presentation in front of a bookcase laden with binders he said held copies of original documents and cases of CDs.

    “We're going to show you Iran's secret nuclear files,” Netanyahu said.

    He then laid out what he said was a years-old secret nuclear weapons programme stored away that could be put into action at any time.

    The details have been shared with the US and will also be given to other countries and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), he said.



    Historic Iranian programme

    The White House underscored the US policy that “Iran must never have nuclear weapons” in a statement about Netanyahu's speech.

    “These facts are consistent with what the United States has long known: Iran had a robust, clandestine nuclear weapons programme that it has tried and failed to hide from the world and from its own people,” it said.

    Supporters of the Iran nuclear deal have argued that Netanyahu's intelligence release deals simply with a historic Iranian programme and does not prove they are in breach of the 2015 accord.

    But Pompeo argued that it helped to “spell out the scope and scale of the programme that they undertook” in Iran.

    He said Trump would have to determine whether the US feels Iran is in violation of the deal, and said US translators and analysts are still trawling through the intelligence provided by the Israelis.

    Trump and his Middle East allies argue that the agreement, approved by Barack Obama, was too weak and needs to be replaced with a more permanent arrangement and supplemented by controls on Iran's missile programme.

    Zarif accused Trump of “jumping on a rehash of old allegations already dealt with by the IAEA to 'nix' the (2015 nuclear) deal”.

    “How convenient. Coordinated timing of alleged intelligence revelations by the boy who cries wolf just days before 12 May,” Zarif said of Netanyahu. French President Emmanuel Macron and Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany left Washington last week after talks with Trump that failed to secure any promise to keep the deal alive. The Israeli premier has repeatedly called for the accord - which Iran signed with Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the US - to either be altered or scrapped.



    Sanctions

    He says the agreement does not prevent Tehran from eventually obtaining nuclear weapons and says the lifting of sanctions has increased Tehran's ability to finance proxy militants in the Middle East.

    Netanyahu also wants to see curbs on Iran's missile programme.

    He said the nuclear deal was “based on Iranian lies and Iranian deception”.

    “Even after the deal, Iran continued to preserve and expand its nuclear weapons know-how for future use,” Netanyahu added.

    Rob Malley, a former Obama administration official, tweeted that “for those who have followed the Iranian nuclear file, there is nothing new in (Netanyahu's) presentation”.

    “All it does is vindicate need for the nuclear deal.

    But the Israeli prime minister has an audience of one: Trump. And he's unfortunately unlikely to reach the same conclusion.”

    Israel is considered the Middle East's sole nuclear-armed nation, though it has never acknowledged the capability.

    NAMPA/AFP

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    Aakalimo yomosingela mOshaanda taya lumbu monkalo yanayipalaAakalimo yomosingela mOshaanda taya lumbu monkalo yanayipalaAanona taya putudhilwa monkalo inayi opala Oondunda dhokukala aaniilonga ndhoka dha tungwa moomvula dho 1950 moGrootfontein natango odhi na aantu nonando odha nyenyetwa uule woomvula mbali dha piti omolwa onkalo yanayipala moka mu na oondunda ndhoka. Aantu mboka haya zi moondunda ndhoka oya popi kutya oya li ya nyanyukwa sho elelo lyondoolopa yaGrootfontein lye ya lombwele kutya otaya ka tungilwa omagumbo, oomvula mbali dha piti.

    Oondunda dhoka odhi li po 400 na odhina aakalimo ya thika po 1 800, mwakwatelwa aanona mboka taya lumbu monkalo inayi yogoka.

    Elelo lyondooloa ndjoka olya li lya tseyitha kutya otali kumuna po oondunda ndhoka molwaashoka olya monena aantu mboka ehala mpoka taya vulu okutunga omagumbo gawo, ihe onzo yimwe melelo moka oya popi kutya aantu owala 100, ya tulululwa okuza mehala ndyoka.

    Oondunda ndhoka odha tungwa po kepangelo lyuukoloni moomvula dho 1950, onga omahala gaaniilonga aalumentu mboka yali haya zi moondunda ndhoka oyo awike.



    Konima yoomvula 60 dha piti monena aakiintu naalumentu otaya zi moondunda ndhoka, nokuningitha opo ehala ndyoka kali kale niiholekwa ya sha.



    “Tse otatu lumbu monkalo ya dhigupala. Kehe ondunda oyi na ehala lyokulala oshowo okombitha ihe oto a dha aantu omulongo taya zi mondunda yimwe. Kape na iiholekwa molwaashoka aavali naanona otaya lala moondunda dhimwe, naanona taya kokele momudhingoloko nguka, otaya tulwa moshiponga shiinima oyindji,” omukalimo gumwe Eino Sheya a popi.

    Omukalimo gumwe, Simon Frans, okwa popi kutya oondunda dhimwe otadhi longithwa mokudhungilwa iikolitha ngaashi otombo, moka oofamili odhindji omo hadhi mono iiyemo.

    Pahapu dhe, moondunda moka omu na aantu oyendji ya yooloka mwakwatelwa aaniilonga yamuni oshowo aaniilonga yepangelo.

    “Ohatu futu oshimaliwa shooN$400 komwedhi inamu kwatelwa omeya nolusheno. Iimaliwa mbyoka iishona naashoka osho sha etitha aantu oyendji ya tokole okukala mpaka, nonando onkalo oya nayipala,” Frans a popi.

    Omukokele, Fredrick Tsueb, okwa popi kutya ye ohazi molukanda lwaSoweto ihe ohayi a kuuhale koondunda ndhoka a kanwe iikunwa mbyoka hayi dhungwako, nokukala pamwe nayakwawo.

    Sho ya ningilwa omapulo, ngoka ta longo pehala lyomunambelewa omukuluntu gwondoolopa ndjoka, Arnold Ameb, okwa popi kutya ita vulu okuyamukula omapulo, molwaashoka opo owala uulikwa, nonando okwa kala ta longo uule woomvula odhindji, onga omunambelewa e na opoosa onene melelo lyondoolopa ndjoka.

    Omunambelewa gwomauyelele melelo lyondoolopa ndyoka, Luke Salomo, naye ina yamukula komapulo ngoka tuminwa na okwa popi kutya oku li mefudho.

    “Onda ulikwa owala momasiku ga4 gaApilili. Opo tandi tala onkalo, itandi vulu okutya sha manga,” Ameb a popi.

    Pauyelele mboka a gandjwa konzo, elelo lyondoolopa ndjoka olya ndopa okutula ponomola yotango eikalekelo lyiiyemo mbyoka ya nuninwa okutululula aakalimo mboka.

    “Evi opo li li ihe kape na iiyemo yokulonga evi ndyoka. Ndika oli li epungulo enene namuni okwa pumbwa okukonga iiyemo. Aantu oyendji mboka haya zi moondunda ndhoka otaya vulu okutunga omagumbo gawo shoka taya pumbwa evi.”

    Onzo ndjoka oya tsikile kutya omolwa ompumbwe yevi onene ya taalela ondoolopa ndjoka, elelo olya ndopa okutula ponomola yotango etulululo lwaakwashigwana mboka. Okwa hololwa woo kutya yamwe mboka ya tulululwa na oya tungu omagumbo gawo, otaya hiilitha po omagumbo, omanga ya shuna moondunda ndhoka.

    IENI NANDJATO

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    Aakalimo yomoImpalila ya patelwa pondjeAakalimo yomoImpalila ya patelwa pondje Konyala aakwashigwana ya thika po 3 000 mboka ye li aakalimo yomoImpalila Island moshitopolwa shaZambezi oya popi kutya oha ya longitha uuwato okuya moKatima Mulilo ngele taya pumbwa omakwatho gopaunamiti gomeendelelo.

    Pahapu dhaakwashigwana yamwe po oshowo omuhwahwameki gwoshigwana momudhingoloko ngoka, Patrick Simaata, okwa popi kutya aakwashigwana mboka oyiikalekelwa nonando epangelo olya li lya ningi omauvaneko kutya otali ka yambulapo oonkalamwenyo dhawo.

    “Katu na omundohotola konima nkene oshilongo sha manguluka. Pendiki lyuundjolowele lyetu ope na owala aapangi yaali, OmuKenya gumwe oshowo OmuNamibia, niipotha oyindji ohayi ukithwa moKatima Mulilo, ihe katu na ontopa yokutaagulukila,” Simaata a popi.

    Okantuntu hoka oke li oongamba na oka dhingolokwa komeya gomulonga gwaZambezi. Okeli egumbo kaakwashigwana yeli po 2 500 okuya po 3 000 nomikunda omishona dha thika po 25, dhaakwashigwana yomuhoko gwAaTswana ya za moBotswana oshowo AaSubia yaNamibia.







    Okantuntu hoka ohaka pitilwa okuza moKasane moBotswana oshowo kombinga yomulonga gwaChobe. Ope na woo omweelo gwaanambelewa yekondololo lyomatembu.

    Simaata ngoka e li omunambelewa omugandji gomakwatho gopaunamiti gopaulumomhumbwe, okwa popi kutya oombelewa dhomatembu poKasane ohadhi pata potundi onti 16:30 , naashoka otashi holola kutya aanuumvu otaya vulu owala okufalwa moKatima Mulilo, esiku tali landula molwaashoka aanambelewa yopolisi koongamba dhaBotswana, oye na oompango dha kwata miiti.

    Okwa tsikie kutya ngele omukiintu iihumbata okwa yi koKasane, ohaya pula e fute oshimaliwa shoopula 3 000 moshipangelo shepangelo. Aapangi kokantuntu hoka ohaya kambadhala okugandja omakwatho momukalo kehe ngoka taya vulu, ihe kaye na ko eshina lyomupepo gwombepo yokufudha naashoka ohashi etitha owala aantu yamwe ya hulithe.

    Simaata okwa popi kutya uuministeli wuundjolowele owuna ontseyo kombinga yonkalo ndjoka ya taalela aakwashigwana mboka.

    Kansela gwoshikandjohogololo John Likando oya patelwa pondje koHarambee grand scheme, neindilo lyawo opo ya ningilwe ontopa yokutaagululila olya thiki momakutsi ga thita.

    Likando okwa tsikile kutya iikulya yooprogramma dhokugandja oondya mooskola ohayi falwa okuza moNamibia okuya moBotswana nokutulwa nduno muumbautu uushona opo yi falwe kokantuntu hoka.

    Okwa tsikile kutya shoka uupyakadhi molwaashoka ohaya e ta owala iikulya ayihe yoshikako ashihe niikulya yimwe otayi ningi nayi.



    Priscilla Silobe, ngoka a longitha otaxi yombautu okukalanda iipumbiwa ye esiku kehe etiyali koongamba dhaBotswana mondoolopa yaKasane okwa popi kutya oondjamba ohadhi yonagulapo omapya gawo. Oku na woo iimuna iishona.

    Aakwashigwana oya popi kutya oya pumbwa woo ehala lyomalandithilo molwaashoka ngashiingeyi ohaya kalanditha moKasane nenge moKatima Mulilo.

    Dominique Sitengu, mwene gwotaxi ndjoka okwa popi kutya oyiikolelela kuBotswana mu kehe shimwe. Okwa popi kutya oha futitha woo aafaalela ye oshimaliwa shooN$10.

    Omukwashigwana gumwe, Kaliki Ngonga, okwa nyenyeta kutya ohaya ihumbatelwa nayi poongamba molwaashoka ohaya kalapo ethimbo ele ngele oya hala okuya moKatima Mulilo.

    “Ngame omukwati gwoohi na omunafaalama woo. Onda pumbwa okuya moKatima Mulilo opo ndi landithe iilandithomwa yandje. Omathimbo gamwe ohandi dhimbwa ko omukanda gwandje gwomalweendo, nongele otaxi oya thikama poKasane nena otandi tulwa miipandeko.”

    Masabane okwa popi kutya otaka yamukula komapulo ngoka a ningilwa koshifokudnaeki shoNamibian Sun, ihe pethimbo ehokololo ndika lya nyanyangithwa, ina yamukula natango.

    · Omutoolinkundana gwoNamibian Sun, Jemima Beukes okwa li moKasane, Botswana, kehiyo lyoSADC melongelokumwe nUuministeli wOmauyelele nOmakwatathano goPautekinika. Okwa wayimine aatoolinkundana ya za moNamibia, Botswana oshowo Zambia molweendo kontopa yaKazangula yi li pokati kaBotswana naZambia.

    JEMIMA BEUKES

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  • 05/02/18--16:00: There is a tomorrow
  • There is a tomorrowThere is a tomorrow Finally, the most talked about event in Namibia that brings everyone together from artists to designers to makeup artists and sound engineers, was successfully held and is now over. I, for one, am looking forward to putting it all behind me and focusing on other stuff. With this said I just want to give my two cents on the whole event and give pointers on where we need to improve going forward.

    I truly believe that the organising committee is not appreciated at all and with this I just want to congratulate them again for putting on the show they did. I have realised that many (being artists) believe the NAMAs are their birth right that must be held and must support their music. It's really sad because in actual sense it is a privilege and it should be treated that way. I've seen so many speak ill of the awards show just because they didn't win or they were not nominated, but in the previous years they have walked away with many awards. Did they also feel there was foul play then? I'm yet to hear any of them return their awards. It really is tiring that all the artists focus on is how unfair the awards are. Be grateful that your industry, out of all art forms in Namibia, is the only one that is backed up by so many organisations who invest so much from time and money in it.

    I honestly believe that all the winners all deserved their winnings and congratulations to every one of them. I think the judging committee did an amazing job this year. Yes, every artist released and dropped their best work but there can only be one winner. I was rooting for the TKB's from Rundu to win just one award at least but I guess it's not their time yet. Nonetheless it's all about working harder and focusing on putting out good music. I think the Male Artist of the Year Kalux is a great testimony of the rewards of patience and hard work and how it pays off, even ten years later.

    Going forward, let's be thankful for the efforts being made to appreciate our arts. Set your goals that suit you and your fans and win through this.

    June Shimuoshili

    june@namibiansun.com

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  • 05/02/18--16:00: Sky Sam's UV wonderland
  • Sky Sam's UV wonderlandSky Sam's UV wonderlandMore than meets the eye tjil talks to an artist about his project that is aimed to outline a reflection of one's self. Samuel Matengu, well known as Sky Sam, is a 25-year-old abstract photographer. His infatuation with the camera started ever since he could remember, but he only took a keen interest in 2015. In 2016 he started experimenting with different sources of light and opened his studio called Sky Sam Photography.

    “After that I kept on experimenting different photography styles under different light conditions,” he said.

    Sky Sam launched his UV photography exhibition titled Black Light Portrait Party at the Goethe Institute on 24 April and it will run until 11 May. According to Wikipedia, a UV light is an electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength from 10 nm to 400 nm, shorter than that of visible light but longer than X-rays. It is the light that often is seen in nightclubs and gives off light that one cannot see with the naked eye.

    “My ultraviolet led light photography project is basically a series of pictures that are taken using ultraviolet led light. I decided to take portraits of some local artists under the UV light, because I feel that they are a reflection of me as an artist as well and the body of work will be an interpretation of the society I live in as a young Namibian,” he said.

    Although some pictures will be visible under the fluorescence light with the naked eye, using the ultraviolet led light will enhance a better visual of the photo. Sky Sam is aims to break the barriers of what Namibian photography is limited in by introducing a new style or method of photography.

    “The pictures are recorded using different photography techniques such as long exposure photography; night photography and motion blur using light from the ultraviolet spectrum only. It is really unique and everyone must come see it out,” he said.

    The portraits which are on display at the Goethe Institute are available for purchase.

    June Shimuoshili

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  • 05/02/18--16:00: NAMA highlights 2018
  • NAMA       highlights 2018NAMA highlights 2018Eight memorable moments From winners to fashion and the return to the awards, here is tjil's take on the 2018 NAMAs. The 2018 edition of the NAMAs delivered yet another spectacular event at Swakopmund last weekend, for the second time in the coastal town. The main sponsors and organisers, NBC and MTC, pulled out all the stops to ensure that the event indeed lived up to its billing. It was indeed a memorable night with some emotional and inspiring acceptance speeches that caused a social media uproar. There were stimulating performances, including a stirring memoriam to fallen musical heroes. Here are eight memorable moments from the NAMAs in case you missed it.



    Acceptance speeches

    Usually, the speeches by the winners are dedicated to their support systems, loved ones, and the fans — but this year many were shade throwing, and artists making the stage their personal battle field. Best Hip-Hop Artist of the Year KP Illest gave the usual heartfelt speech about unity and love when he got up to get his award. He urged the industry to rather criticise to build and empower instead of doing the opposite. It was also interesting to note that majority of the speeches were pro-government. Makes one think it was because of the presence of the First Citizen in the crowd or simply because we are approaching elections and it's only fair that the tender to make songs goes to the one with the winning speech. Another speech that will go down in history is that of the Best Music Video Artist of the Year, Gazza. The man was just so fired up that he is being labelled an over-emotional man on social media. He wasn't shy to admit that he was scared of not walking away with anything due to the noise around his entries but alas, victory was his. Gazza said it was all hard work as he had to fly to Miami twice and even worse, he had to beg the director Hype William whom Gazza wasn't shy of mentioning that he shot videos of A-lister Beyonce. In his speech, Gazza said although the noise was made by other artists, he does not make noise for them but for the public. Talk about shots fired.

    Dancers

    There was never a year where the general public and those who attended the event had positive remarks on the dancers. Usually its “they are not in sync, what are they doing? Is that the best they can do?” but this year, something definitely changed and we say thumbs up and keep it up NAMA organising committee. It could because there were a lot great minds, both local and international, as the organisers sought help from neighbouring countries including South Africa and Angola for dancers. Their costumes were on par and matched all the performances being danced to… it was simply amazing. Keep it up and congratulations to the dancers for pulling off the amazing choreographies.



    Presenters

    The NAMAs is Namibia's biggest glamorous night and the job of hosting the ceremony is an overwhelming one. Keeping the long ceremony lively while making people laugh and entertained isn't easy. This year we were in the company of the three Charlies or NAMA Angels and they did a great job. Odile Gertze, Esperance Luvindao and Tanya Daringo tried their best to keep the crowd on their toes, but Mavis Elias, an extra presenter, along with Daringo struggled a bit to keep their attention. Elias' speaking was louder than the microphone and it came off as if she was shouting. The rest did an excellent job and hosted the big event with sheer grace and elegance. The presenting team diverted from the typical male and female blend and switched things up this year with four females and one male. Joining the angels was Paul Da Prince. Paul Da Prince must be the coolest and most collected MC ever to grace the NAMA stage. It's simply impossible to bomb when you are that comfortable addressing a room full of suits and starlets and thousands of viewers watching at home. He was damn well swagged up, damn eloquent, damn funny and damn damning in all his appearances during the event. We definitely look forward to seeing you and the angels next year Paul.



    Turnout

    The NAMAs is usually a national event with people driving from all the corners of the country. This year however, very few attended by the look of how empty the hall was… more especially the general access area. The first time the NAMAs was held in Swakopmund the turn-up was close to 7 000. It could be because of the controversies that erupted this year with the nominees and the fact that the artists didn't really push in terms of getting the fans to vote and generally talk about awards. One can also easily blame the late marketing of the event that was not as impactful as the previous years. tjil sent out questions to the organising committee but there was no response before going to print. We really hope for a better turnout next year and the many more to come.



    The return

    Two massive groups made a grand comeback to the NAMAs being the Maszanga Family and PDK. The groups that have been missing in action over the past years have finally buried their hatchet with the NAMA brand. To make matters even more explosive, both groups won in the categories they were nominated in. Man, we are excited for the future of Namibian music. On social media the fans couldn't contain their happiness for the artists. Keep on keeping PDK and Maszanga Family.



    The stage

    If you have seen the show of Jay-Z and Kanye West titled Niggas in Paris and you were at the NAMAs you would have noticed some similarities. This is because the stage concept was inspired from the American musical show. The only difference is the towers which the award presenters appeared first before walking onto the main stage where lower. The whole stage design is to give the illusion that one is in space and hence the theme, 'Your NAMA World'. The LCD panels with P12 mash that are see-through were set up in such a way to act as the screen during award presenting. The panels could also move up and down and could be cleared out of the way during the performances. The stage set-up started on 16 April and the last finishing touches were added on the day of the event. In total, there were about 768 lights used on the stage alone. The cabling used altogether was 1 200 kilometres long. The Mikel Jes team really outdid themselves, hey. Keep up the innovative spirit and may we see it next year again.



    The Bar

    An exciting addition to the 2018 NAMAs that will most likely go down in history was the bar on the stage. The bar allowed artists and guests to sit and watch the whole show. The bar also served as a lounge interview area were presenters carried out their interviews, providing a comfortable setting to the whole show. This was also the area were Gazza famously accepted the fact that he was scared of not walking away with any award on the night and the very same place where South African Minnie Dlamini Jones and Lungile Radu were interviewed by Paul Da Prince and Mavis Braga.



    Performances that rocked the night

    Although the crowd was very rigid and quiet throughout the night, some artists managed to keep the energies high. Deal Done Records artists Monique English and Salvador opened up the night by serenading the crowd with their track 'Does She Know'. The two paired well together and performed a well put together song. Besides the local performances of the night of KP Illest, Bullet yaKaoko and PDK, one of the standout performances was of that of Distruction Boyz and Babes Wodumo, South African artists that make the currently trending on Gqom music. Even when the crew performed their hit song 'Omunye', the crowd was still seated and did not lift their chairs in honour of the song. KP Illest performed the track 'Okay Okay' which he won him the rap track of the year.

    His performance did not do justice to the track as the performance was dull and short-lived. The dancers however did deliver a stellar performance and made it a point to stand out in terms outfits and choreography. PDK's performance was rather comical and it was much enjoyed by President Hage Geingob and First Lady Monica Geingos who were part of the crowd during the stellar performances.









    June Shimuoshili & Tunohole Mungoba

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  • 05/02/18--16:00: Sally and Kalux win big
  • Sally and Kalux win bigSally and Kalux win bigA good example of patience, hard work and dedication Sally Boss Madam and Kalux came up on top and ended the NAMAs as the biggest winners of the night after being awarded the Female and Male Artist of the Year. All roads led to The Dome in Swakopmund this past weekend after the biggest event in the Namibian music fraternity.

    The NAMAs crowned Kalux as the Male Artist of the Year and Sally Boss Madam as the Female Artist of the Year, on the arguably the biggest stage in the entertainment industry.

    Born in Outjo and raised in Otjiwarongo, Kalux also walked away with Best Damara Punch.

    The artist, with three albums to his name, Tuhafeni being his latest release, thanked his fans for their undying support during his musical journey.

    “I am honestly so blessed. No words can express my happiness right now and I want to thank every single one that believed in me and my dream,” he said after the awards show.

    He is not new to winning big at the NAMAs after he was crowned Best Newcomer of the Year in 2015.

    The 'Ayeko' hitmaker is also the proud owner of his own Superstar Records which aims at removing restrictions with music labels.

    The 2018 Female Artist of the Year also thanked her fellow Boss Madam clan and says she wants to pave the way for all female artists to rise up and work together.

    “I just want to tell all my fans that we have finally made it.

    All our hard work finally paid off and I am grateful to everyone that played a role in this win,” she said.

    Sally also won the award for the Best RnB category with her track 'Ecstasy'.

    Living the dream through hard work and dedication the Boss Madam way, Sally is on the way up and taking her time doing so.

    From collaboration with international stars, winning local and international awards, to being the face of MultiChoice Namibia, she says patience and dedication are key.

    TUNOHOLE MUNGOBA

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    When America meets Namibia…When America meets Namibia… I was disappointed to learn that a vast majority of Namibians, including yours truly, have not visited all corners of this beautiful country. I mean, if you have a man like Tjeripo for a friend - your weekend itinerary is clear-cut; Windhoek-Gobabis-Okombepera-Gobabis-Windhoek!

    Of course, before you leave the great capital, you would do well to pass by Herero Mall with your Isuzu bakkie loaded with mesh wire, corrugated iron sheets and bales of livestock feed. Ja, to the untrained eye, this resembles a wealthy man - equated with one with a farm of his own.

    Once there, you take your time to order a large plate of stew and Castello for the road. If people inquire as to the load on your bakkie, be modest and say “It’s just a few things for my third farm.”

    In any case, my lack of knowledge of Namibia’s sights and scenes made me think twice about acting as a tour guide for a visiting friend from the States. Okay, here is what happened; she landed at Hosea Kutako International Airport and requested to be taken around the country.

    I knew at the back of my mind that my dear friend Shirley, who never had to tie her own shoelaces, thought of Africa as a place where she would give a monkey a high-five, or have a group hug with the Big Five.

    Our conversation, as I took her around the country could not really be classified as the epitome of our journey:

    “So does it ever get windy in Africa? I have seen on TV that it never rains here, so how do the plants grow?” she asked me at one point.

    “We import all plants fully grown and then just sit around watching them die,” I responded

    “But I will be able to see elephants in the street, right?”

    “Depends on how much you´ve been drinking.”

    “I see. What if want to walk from Oshakati to Lüderitz - can I follow the railroad tracks?”

    “Sure, it´s only two thousand kilometres - take lots of water.”

    I thought she had caught onto my sarcasm by now, but alas she dropped another one!

    “Is it safe to run around in the bushes in Okakarara?”

    I tried again, “So it´s true what they say about people from Texas? You have seen the Texas Chainsaw Massacre movie, right?”

    “Charlie, you shouldn’t get offended. I just want to know stuff about your country. For instance, are there any ATMs in Namibia? Can you compile me a list of them in Windhoek, Tsumeb, Swakopmund and Oshakati?”

    “What the hell? Tell me, what did your last slave die of?”

    “Okay, I get it. What about some information about kangaroo racing in Swakopmund?”

    “Shirley, Aus-tra-lia is that big island in the middle of the Pacific. A-fri-ca is the big triangle-shaped continent south of Europe which does not... oh forget it, sure, the kangaroo racing is every Tuesday night in Mondesa township. Come naked.”

    “Okay, I get it, but tell me this; can I bring cutlery into Namibia?”

    “Why,” I asked, “... just use your fingers like we do.”

    We were turning into Opuwo when she asked “Will we get to see the Vienna Boys Choir in action?”

    “Shirley, you are not listening. Okay, let me put it this way; Aus-tri-a is that quaint little country bordering Ger-man-y, which is... oh forget it. Sure, the Vienna Boys Choir plays every Tuesday night in Mondesa, straight after the kangaroo races. Come naked.”

    I must have finally gotten through to her – there was a great deal of silence for a long time. As we drove out of Opuwo later that day, HARD TALK however commenced!

    “Charlie, would you give me a list of all doctors in Namibia who can dispense rattlesnake serum?

    “Rattlesnakes, Shirley, are found in A-meri-ca, which is where YOU come from. All Namibian snakes are perfectly harmless, can be safely handled and make good pets. And in case you are wondering whether we celebrate Christmas, yes we do – at Christmas. As for killer bees, no, we do not have them in Namibia – but we can import them for you.”

    We continued the rest of the journey in peaceful harmony, as I silently sing the late Uncle Jay Kaujeua’s tune – “It’s good to be back home”.

    Until then...

    Tjatindi@gmail.com

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    Ways to take control of your career development Ways to take control of your career development Making your way to the top We are now in the era of do-it-yourself career development. Companies less frequently offer formal training — a trend that has been around for years. This may be because employees change jobs so frequently (job tenure now averages about four years) that firms don’t see the value in investing in people who are likely to leave. This is a sharp contrast with the investment that senior leaders used to make in employees. During my 11 years at PepsiCo, mostly during the 1990s, “personal development” was treated as a major company initiative.

    Unfortunately, organizations today are unknowingly leaving employees with skill gaps and blind spots that can derail careers and organizational effectiveness. And managers aren’t helping. Too worried about their own hides, most managers don’t have time or energy to focus on anyone else’s. In fact, Korn Ferry found that when managers rated themselves on 67 managerial skills, “developing others” came in dead last.

    Ideally, organizations would do more to foster career development: encourage more-immediate feedback, develop clear performance criteria, deliver developmental feedback with clarity and tact, and provide resources and incentives for managers to make employee development a priority. But the reality is that the bigger burden is on employees. Workers at all levels must learn to identify their weaknesses, uncover their blind spots, and strengthen their skills.

    Here are six things you can do to take control of your career development.

    Understand what you’re evaluated on. What does success look like in your position? What are your job goals and success metrics? It’s best to identify these with your manager, but if that’s not happening, then write down what you understand the goals and key performance indicators to be. Take them to your boss to get their agreement, and engage in an ongoing dialogue to ensure you stay on the right track.

    Solve for your own blind spots. Top performers are always learning and adjusting, and routinely seek feedback from their boss, peers, and subordinates. If your boss doesn’t proactively give you feedback, start the conversation yourself. After a presentation or big meeting, state one thing that you think went well, and then ask for advice on one thing you could improve. It’s best to keep it simple; most people can only absorb one area to improve at a time. Listen to and thank your boss for the feedback.

    Codify your learnings. You can capture feedback and learning by keeping a journal. List the five to 10 skills or competencies you need to develop in your position, and rate yourself (either on your own or with the help of a trusted adviser) on each. For example, if you’re a brand marketer, you might give yourself an A in advertising development, a B+ in pricing analysis, and a C in trade marketing. Focus on the C’s to close skill gaps. Seeking feedback from someone who previously held your job can speed up your learning.

    Increase your visibility with the C-suite. It’s not always possible to get noticed by senior leaders through your direct work, so you might try volunteering for initiatives, such as charity work, company events, or on-campus recruiting. This is an easy but often overlooked way to rub elbows with senior people who will see you in action and ideally take notice of your contributions.

    Become an expert in an area of increasing importance to your company. Your company may be grappling with a disruption from a new technology such as the internet of things, artificial intelligence, or cloud-based computing. Become the expert person in your department on an emerging issue. Conduct research and literature reviews, attend conferences, or write on the topic. Developing expertise in a nascent area of growing importance can lead to promotions and other career opportunities.

    Seek good counsel and mentoring. The perspective of a senior person is invaluable, but pouncing on someone — “Will you be my mentor?” — is likely to scare them off. Try to meet in an informal way: in the coffee shop in your company’s lobby, or at the company picnic or golf outing. Know the person’s bio, and be prepared to ask a few good questions related to their area of expertise. If things go well, you’ll hear, “If I can help you, let me know.” A week or so later, you can extend an invitation to “continue the conversation” over coffee. In time, a mentor relationship may develop organically.

    Strong functional skills take time to develop. In most positions, whether it’s enterprise sales, brand marketing, supply chain logistics, or corporate finance, being competent often consists of having deep functional knowledge in four or five key job areas and a good working knowledge in another four or five. Without the willingness to take multiple assignments, or even strategic lateral moves, a well-rounded skill set will be elusive. It takes patience.

    Earlier in my career, I was still at the manager level within PepsiCo while a good friend moved up to vice president by moving to another company. But as my skill set solidified, I understood how the pieces of the business fit together, and my career progression accelerated.

    Your skill set is ultimately your career capital, so take the time to develop your functional skills. Jumping from job to job too quickly (say, in 18-month or two-year increments) won’t allow you to develop the functional expertise you need to advance your career. With time and patience, and by taking the initiative, you’re far more likely to thrive in this DIY world. Source: Harvard Business Review

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  • 05/02/18--16:00: A hiding place for bullies
  • A hiding place for bulliesA hiding place for bullies Attacks on the media, linking it to some sort of conspiracy funded by reactionary forces, hell-bent on undermining and destroying liberation movements turned governments, is nothing new.

    In the southern African context, bullies like Robert Mugabe, Jacob Zuma and other former SADC heads of state have liberally used these conspiracies to explain why they were making headlines for all the wrong reasons.

    It was however disheartening and quite perturbing to hear our very own vice-president, Nangolo Mbumba, in a speech read on his behalf at a Workers' Day rally on Tuesday, seeking to throw shade, while at the same time regressing to this hiding place created by those who are looking for scapegoats.

    It is unclear whether Mbumba penned the speech himself, but it showed all the hallmarks of someone who was making a valiant attempt to defend the indefensible.

    How one can blame the media for a growing scepticism 28 years after independence is beyond comprehension. Namibia, a nation of about 2.5 million people, blessed with a plethora of natural resources and riches, remains one of the world's most unequal societies. This is not a media creation. Politically connected tenderpreneurs emptying state coffers is also not a creation of “some media houses”.

    One could go on and on about a small group of elite vacuuming up the country's resources, who don't, in the words of Mbumba, need a “connected coterie of politically opportunistic people who seemed to have vowed to target the government and denounce it as everything but good and competent, until it is brought down”, to make headlines.

    A head of state, and his or her government, including our own president, Hage Geingob, should be open to fair criticism.

    We are not living in the type of dictatorships that characterise many of our international so-called friends.

    If the media, in the words of Mbumba, is “misleadingly rehashing old stories or contriving fake news, to foster widespread hatred and discontent among the general Namibian populace”, then there are remedies available. That is democracy.

    Journalists, like most Namibians, will remain patriots, who painstakingly do their work, with the hope that it can add to the nation's development agenda.

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    When America meets Namibia…When America meets Namibia… I was disappointed to learn that a vast majority of Namibians, including yours truly, have not visited all corners of this beautiful country. I mean, if you have a man like Tjeripo for a friend - your weekend itinerary is clear-cut; Windhoek-Gobabis-Okombepera-Gobabis-Windhoek!

    Of course, before you leave the great capital, you would do well to pass by Herero Mall with your Isuzu bakkie loaded with mesh wire, corrugated iron sheets and bales of livestock feed. Ja, to the untrained eye, this resembles a wealthy man - equated with one with a farm of his own.

    Once there, you take your time to order a large plate of stew and Castello for the road. If people inquire as to the load on your bakkie, be modest and say “It's just a few things for my third farm.”

    In any case, my lack of knowledge of Namibia's sights and scenes made me think twice about acting as a tour guide for a visiting friend from the States. Okay, here is what happened; she landed at Hosea Kutako International Airport and requested to be taken around the country.

    I knew at the back of my mind that my dear friend Shirley, who never had to tie her own shoelaces, thought of Africa as a place where she would give a monkey a high-five, or have a group hug with the Big Five.

    Our conversation, as I took her around the country could not really be classified as the epitome of our journey:

    “So does it ever get windy in Africa? I have seen on TV that it never rains here, so how do the plants grow?” she asked me at one point.

    “We import all plants fully grown and then just sit around watching them die,” I responded

    “But I will be able to see elephants in the street, right?”

    “Depends on how much you´ve been drinking.”

    “I see. What if want to walk from Oshakati to Lüderitz - can I follow the railroad tracks?”

    “Sure, it´s only two thousand kilometres - take lots of water.”

    I thought she had caught onto my sarcasm by now, but alas she dropped another one!

    “Is it safe to run around in the bushes in Okakarara?”

    I tried again, “So it´s true what they say about people from Texas? You have seen the Texas Chainsaw Massacre movie, right?”

    “Charlie, you shouldn't get offended. I just want to know stuff about your country. For instance, are there any ATMs in Namibia? Can you compile me a list of them in Windhoek, Tsumeb, Swakopmund and Oshakati?”

    “What the hell? Tell me, what did your last slave die of?”

    “Okay, I get it. What about some information about kangaroo racing in Swakopmund?”

    “Shirley, Aus-tra-lia is that big island in the middle of the Pacific. A-fri-ca is the big triangle-shaped continent south of Europe which does not... oh forget it, sure, the kangaroo racing is every Tuesday night in Mondesa township. Come naked.”

    “Okay, I get it, but tell me this; can I bring cutlery into Namibia?”

    “Why,” I asked, “... just use your fingers like we do.”

    We were turning into Opuwo when she asked “Will we get to see the Vienna Boys Choir in action?”

    “Shirley, you are not listening. Okay, let me put it this way; Aus-tri-a is that quaint little country bordering Ger-man-y, which is... oh forget it. Sure, the Vienna Boys Choir plays every Tuesday night in Mondesa, straight after the kangaroo races. Come naked.”

    I must have finally gotten through to her – there was a great deal of silence for a long time. As we drove out of Opuwo later that day, HARD TALK however commenced!

    “Charlie, would you give me a list of all doctors in Namibia who can dispense rattlesnake serum?

    “Rattlesnakes, Shirley, are found in A-meri-ca, which is where YOU come from. All Namibian snakes are perfectly harmless, can be safely handled and make good pets. And in case you are wondering whether we celebrate Christmas, yes we do – at Christmas. As for killer bees, no, we do not have them in Namibia – but we can import them for you.”

    We continued the rest of the journey in peaceful harmony, as I silently sing the late Uncle Jay Kaujeua's tune – “It's good to be back home”.

    Until then...

    Tjatindi@gmail.com

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    Five ways to motivate your employees (it’s easier than you think)Five ways to motivate your employees (it’s easier than you think) Happy workers are productive workers. But how do you motivate a group of employees to work hard and help your company grow? Luckily, motivating your employees doesn’t take a lot of flare or even a lot of resources. 1. Communicate Better If you’re nothing more than a face on a newsletter or a name on an email, what motivation will your employees have to meet your goals? The importance of employee communications is often overlooked. You should communicate with them frequently, and actually speak with them face-to-face.

    2. Be an Example You can’t expect your employees to work hard or behave the way you want them to if you don’t lead by example. If you show your excitement about the company’s goals, your employees will get on-board and work to achieve those goals. Good moods are always infectious.

    3. Empower Them Give your employees more of a say in how they do their job. Ask for their input and get suggestions on how they can improve their performance. Most employees have ideas about how they can be more efficient, but they may not share them with you unless you specifically ask them.

    4. Offer Opportunities for Advancement Your employees are more motivated when they know they’re working towards something. If they think there’s no opportunity for advancement, they don’t have much to work for. Motivate your employees by offering training that gives them the skills they need to climb their career ladder because it enables you to build your company’s reputation as a great place to work.

    5. Provide Incentives Incentives are always motivation boosters and they don’t have to be expensive. You can offer incentives like an extra paid day off, gift cards, tickets to the movies, or other ways to show your appreciation. If you don’t consistently motivate your employees, you’re sure to experience a higher amount of turnover.

    -www.huffingpost.com

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    4 Ways to Improve Your Office's Work Environment4 Ways to Improve Your Office's Work EnvironmentHere are four ways you can improve your work environment and, in turn, employee engagement. Your work environment impacts your mood, drive and performance. If employees work in a dreary office setting with unfriendly workers, they likely will not feel motivated or confident to speak up. 1. Hire great team members

    Smart businesses know that a good work environment starts with hiring the right people. Make sure employees are professional and team players. The same idea translates to those who are already in the office. When employees work with toxic workers, they are more likely to become toxic themselves.

    2. Improve the lighting

    Lighting plays a vital role in workers' performance and attitude. It has been proven that exposure to natural light improves mood and energy, greatly impacting focus and productivity. But nearly half of office workers said there is little to no natural light in their office.

    If it's not possible to incorporate natural lighting through windows, there are other options. Blue-enriched light bulbs may reduce fatigue and increase happiness and work performance. Use this type of lighting in brainstorming rooms. In meeting or break rooms, use warmer tones to promote calmness and relaxation. In conference rooms, use middle tones that welcome workers while keeping them alert.

    3. Make the office comfortable

    Working in a clean, attractive office can have tremendous effects on co-workers and manager relationships. Even if the sun can't shine into your workplace, make an effort to provide a relaxing atmosphere with comfy furniture, working equipment and a few 'extra-mile' amenities.

    For example, give your employees the flexibility to choose to work where they're comfortable, including comfy chairs or a choice of whether to sit or stand at their desks.

    Make it easy for [workers] to purchase things like exercise balls and plants on the company dime. When employees choose a space that makes them comfortable, give them the freedom to customize their area, as everyone works differently.

    4. Improve communication

    Be cognizant of how you're interacting with employees. Team members and upper management should focus on their communication methods and the effects they have on the office environment.

    Employees are motivated and feel valued when they're given positive reinforcement and shown how their work contributes to the success of the business. This means offering employees specific feedback on how their work is feeding into the broader business objectives, she noted.

    While you're working on communication, don't forget to show gratitude for hard work. It ignites enthusiasm, increases innovation, builds trust and drives bottom-line results. Even a simple 'thank you' after an employee goes above and beyond on a project, or puts in a series of late nights, goes a long way.

    Source: www.businessnewsdaily.com

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  • 05/02/18--16:00: Writing that killer CV
  • Writing that killer CVWriting that killer CV What is a CV and what can it do for you?

    A CV is your personal specification, it documents your abilities, and shows the reader what you are capable of. It is important to realise that a CV is an exercise in selling yourself in a highly constrained and abbreviated format. Include only what is relevant and positive.

    A well written CV will help get you that interview. This will be the only source of information the employer has about you, along with your covering letter.

    What to put in your CV?

    An employer needs facts about your skills, experience, qualifications, and some personal insight. If they like what they read then they will require contact information to get in touch with you. The order in which these facts are documented is important.

    Contact details

    Convention states that contact details should be at the top underneath your name, then employment history, followed by qualifications. A daytime phone number is most important, include your mobile number if you have one. Include an e-mail address, especially a private address.

    Previous employment

    Write in reverse chronological order, including starting and leaving dates for each position. Include concise details of what the job entailed, your responsibilities and what you achieved in the role. Use active verbs to describe your achievements. Bullet point these at the start of a sentence for maximum impact.

    Qualifications

    There is no need to list all of your primary school and high school subjects, simply write something like, Grade 12 GCSEs A-C including mathematics and English. List only the academic centres where a qualification was earned in reverse chronological order with dates. The more qualifications and experience you have, the less the older qualifications matter.

    References

    Unless you have a reference that you are particularly proud of, then it is advisable not to include references in the CV. Instead simply write "References available on request"

    Language

    · Try to slip in some relevant industry buzzwords, because it is a fact that employers scan read CVs and you want them to think that you know what you are talking about. Source: www.thestudentroom.co.uk

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    Govt urged to unban phosphate miningGovt urged to unban phosphate mining The mining industry, through its chamber, has expressed worry that government's moratorium on marine phosphate mining has not been lifted despite the fact that an environmental clearance certificate was issued in 2016.

    At the time of the issuance of the clearance certificate to Namibia Marine Phosphates, environmental commissioner Teofilus Nghitila felt the environmental management plan submitted by the Omani-backed mining company was sufficient to mitigate the anticipated impacts of seabed mining operations.

    Expressing his concerns, Chamber of Mines of Namibia president Johan Coetzee said the industry welcomed the issuance of the licence to Namibia Marine Phosphates, but was nonetheless worried that its clearance certificate was withdrawn following complaints received at the time.

    “The chamber remains grossly concerned that an agreement and way forward on marine phosphate mining has not yet been concluded but remains supportive of an environment conducive for all sectors of the economy to co-exist,” said Coetzee.

    The moratorium also meant that no new mining jobs could be created because marine phosphate mining was being held back, Coetzee said. “The chamber regrets to note that this is a missed opportunity in the fight against poverty, as per the Harambee Prosperity Plan, as no jobs can be created if this industry cannot take off, even with the most stringent environmental conditions attached to the clearance certificate.”

    This is not the first time the mining industry has expressed concerns regarding the moratorium placed on marine phosphate mining.

    In 2017, the then president of the chamber Kombadayedu Kapangwa also expressed hope that the moratorium would be lifted, saying there was space for all stakeholders in the marine economy to co-exist. The case for phosphate mining

    In 2016, Namibia Marine Phosphates' local partner Knowledge Katti voiced his opposition to the cancellation of the clearance certificate. According to him, there were huge benefits to be derived.

    “To say phosphate will only benefit shareholders is a very simplistic view. Apart from the economic benefits, phosphate concentrate is used as a basic building block for other products. The potential range of food and animal feed products and low-cost fertiliser. No one can question what we can do for our communities,” Katti said at the time.

    “The public will receive over N$700 million via annual taxes.”

    Namibia Marine Phosphates has also over the years made efforts to compile with all requirements of the Environmental Management Act of 2007, and instructions from the environmental commissioner's office.

    It completed extensive consultations with stakeholders and also completed a comprehensive environmental impact assessment (EIA) for the project.

    According to Katti, the EIA concluded there would be no significant impact on the ecosystem or the fishing industry.

    “This was confirmed and verified by a panel of independent internationally accredited experts, as well as an independent external reviewer appointed by the commissioner,” he said.

    Voice of reason

    Marine expert Browen Currie had previously voiced her opposition to phosphate mining, saying that there was no shortage to justify it being mined.

    Her other point of worry was that it would affect the Benguela ecosystem, in the absence of proper knowledge about phosphate mining.

    “There are vulnerable species that play important roles in the functioning of the northern Benguela ecosystem off Namibia, in the same areas as proposed for mining. If allowed, phosphate mining will not be localised to one small area nor to small amounts of seabed being removed,” she said.

    For phosphate mining to happen, government would have to create a clear framework, Currie said.

    “Seabed mining of other minerals or commodities may well take place in the future to coexist with other marine industries, but a comprehensively planned legal framework should first be prepared, taking into consideration the marine environmental concerns.

    “Phosphorus is neither rare nor scarce in the world, it is part of every living cell, and is constantly being recycled by our bodies and by all living plants and animals. There is no danger of it running out,” Currie added.

    The environment ministry did not respond to queries, citing the fact that a court case had been brought against it by proponents of marine phosphate mining.

    OGONE TLHAGE

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  • 05/02/18--16:00: Job portal a dud
  • Job portal a dudJob portal a dudMatch-making plan fails Namibian employers say that when positions are available, the CVs on the system do not match the job description, or, they are not on time. Employers have registered many complaints about the shortcomings of the national job portal that will be revised after just five years in existence.

    The secretary-general of the Namibia Employers' Federation, Tim Parkhouse, told Namibian Sun he has received many complaints from companies that resumes posted on the Namibia Integrated Employment Information System (NIEIS) do not match the job description being advertised.

    Another complaint raised by employers is that often the resumes do not arrive in time when positions are advertised.

    “When the bill was being discussed originally, we warned that the evaluation of CVs and the matching to job requirements would be critical to the success of the scheme. It appears at the moment that this is one of the main weaknesses of the scheme,” he said.

    Parkhouse's comments follow after labour minister Erkki Nghimtina recently announced that the ministry was revising its jobseekers' database to ensure that every job created in the country was registered by the government.

    Only 3 116 (20%) of the 15 569 jobseekers who were registered on the NIEIS during the 2017/18 financial year found jobs.

    The system that was launched in 2013 registers jobseekers and not necessarily unemployed persons. The main aim of the system is to help unemployed people find jobs, while making it easier for employers to hire people.

    Its website shows that the region with the most registered jobseekers is Ohangwena with almost 9 000 registrations, whereas Kavango West has the least with fewer than ten registrations.

    Nghimtina said the fact more than 12 400 people could not find jobs through the system showed that there were serious structural challenges in a component of the employment creation strategy that was intended to provide fair opportunities to all who sought work and to meet employers' hiring needs.

    Nghimtina said one of these shortcomings was the absence of compulsory registration by each employer of every job created in the country.

    According to him it appeared that many employees were not recruited through the system but by word of mouth, personal connections, recommendations by colleagues, or the internet.

    Other shortcomings were a lack of relevant skills necessary for economic growth, and inadequate attention paid to recognition of prior learning.

    Parkhouse says it is difficult to comment on the figures released by the minister without knowing how many applicants are unskilled and how many are skilled and qualified.

    According to Parkhouse another weakness in the statistics is that there is no indication of how many of the registered jobseekers are unemployed and how many are just looking for other jobs.

    The main aim of the scheme was to establish what the Namibian labour market consists of, he says.

    “We do not know what we have, what we need, or in truth how many non-Namibians are employed. Therefore, we support the minister's call that employers should use the system.”

    With regard to the minister's remarks on compulsory reporting by employers, Parkhouse says: “Well, the law is there and it is therefore 'compulsory' for employers to comply. If he is suggesting penalties, then we would not support that at all.

    “It is a requirement of our members that they should comply with all legislation. We may not like a law but if it is law our members must obey.”

    He added the federation supports the process of streamlining the system and making it more effective, and will assist where they can.

    ELLANIE SMIT

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    Bad Remote Work Habits and How to Break ThemBad Remote Work Habits and How to Break Them Avoid these behaviours when working remotely or creating a remote work policy.

    1. Not building a culture

    A strong company culture is important for all small businesses. However, when employees get the chance to work from home, they often neglect this concept. Each company wants and needs to create an atmosphere that sends a message of a wonderful working environment, and many HR professionals work very hard at building that, however, these efforts tend to be lost on employees who work remotely.

    Virtual workers sometimes miss out on the community that most employees feel by coming into the office on a regular basis.

    2. Feeding into distractions

    When you're working in the same environment where you relax, sleep or spend your free time, you'll likely struggle to stay motivated and focused. With little to no supervision, it's easy to get side tracked. Virtual employees are also more vulnerable to various distractions such as children, pets, TVs and other home life matters.

    3. Underestimating face-to-face communication

    While you can communicate with other workers without being in the office, communicating in person is still critical. The biggest issue with remote working is the lack of face-to-face communication. When you speak to someone through a screen or on a call, you often miss out on the chance to connect with them on a more personal level. This affects the entire company's performance and relationship.

    Here are the good habits:

    1. Maintain a live schedule.

    Since you're not seeing your colleagues every day, it's hard to stay updated on their whereabouts and the goings-on of the company. Virtual workers need to make it a point to have a living schedule. By keeping constant updates and reminders, it is easy to stay abreast of what the rest of the team is doing and not get behind or miss deadlines.

    There are many tools and apps that keep track of moving parts of assignments, meetings, days when other employees are in the office and more, he added.

    2. Create a physical workspace.

    Just because you're working at home or in your pajamas doesn't mean you can't create a productive environment. By setting a particular space in the home that is only for work, such as an office or a particular spot at a dining room table, it is a clear message to the employees and anyone around them that they are in work mode.

    It can be as simple as setting up a desk with notepads and pens or clearing some space at your kitchen table rather than lounging on the couch or in bed. Make sure you have zero distractions: Turn off your TV, put on some bright lights, keep your phone on silent unless it's needed for work, etc.

    3. Create a virtual workspace.

    A virtual workspace is just as important as a physical one. Rather than isolating yourself from your colleagues, initiate video calls and group messages. Create a space for all online employees to meet frequently. Having video conferences or conference calls builds community within a team and makes sure no one feels left out.

    Make sure everyone receives an equal amount of attention, and that no one feels out of the loop.

    When managing workers who are not in the office daily, it is important that supervisors provide them with all the information necessary. It is taken for granted how much vital information side conversations contain.

    4. Don't come in only when you have a reason.

    While it's tempting to stay at home as much as possible, don't save in-office days only for required meetings.

    The root of true innovation very often lies in chance meetings. Organize lunches or after-work dinners, and push yourself to come in when others are around – even if your agenda is free that day. This will enable these face-to-face meetings and entice others to the office.

    Remote work could be a bad practice if you push it too far. However, if you make the effort to show up often and connect with colleagues, you'll find the practice more beneficial than problematic.

    Source: www.businessnewsdaily.com

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    Acquitted man wants his money backAcquitted man wants his money back An Egyptian national residing in Swakopmund launched an urgent application in the Windhoek High Court for it to order the Inspector-general of the Namibian police to comply with a lower court order to return N$700 000 they confiscated from him at the Hosea Kutako International Airport more than four years ago.

    Ahmed Mohammed Rashed, since his arrest in 2013, was on trial and was later on 28 March 2018 acquitted on all charges.

    Regional Court Magistrate Ileni Velikoschi on 28 March 2018 consequently ordered that the said foreign currency to the amount of N$700 000 be returned to Rashed.

    He asked for an order forcing the police to comply with court order within 24 hours.

    He asked the court to hold police chief Lieutenant-General Sebastian Ndeitunga, and the safety and security minister in contempt of court and also asked for an order for costs.

    The police at the airport checkpoint Rashed on 6 December 2013 after he allegedly failed to declare bank notes or foreign currency at his port of departure. He attempted to leave with US$63 768 which was contained in a black bag. The other foreign currency notes including euros, rands, and Zambian kwachas were also found in his pockets.

    He maintained that the money was from his savings he had collected over a period of time, but he was arrested for not declaring the money at the checkpoint.

    Velikoshi at the time said the state alleged that the foreign currency amounted to N$642 588 and therefore was more than N$500 000 of foreign currency a resident is allowed to take out of the country per year.

    “There is no evidence of how the financial markets of the day were. No evidence of the contribution each foreign currency had to the amount of N$642 580 the state is alleging,” Velikoshi said.

    According to her, a financial expert on the stock market or financial markets or a bank employee would have been a competent witness especially on the exact exchange rate.

    Judge Thomas Masuku postponed the case to 12 May to enable the defendants to file answering documents in the High Court. Appolos Shimakeleni

    FRED GOEIEMAN

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  • 05/02/18--16:00: Conservation land hijacked
  • Conservation land hijackedConservation land hijackedOmauni community projects suffer The Omauni forest has been hijacked by individuals, despite the land being gazetted for community conservation use. Community conservation areas in Ohangwena have been hijacked by private individuals, who have demarcated private farms for themselves, in a scheme that implicates traditional leaders.

    At a community meeting at Omauni last Saturday, leaders of the two forestry initiatives and a conservancy project reported to environment minister Pohamba Shifeta that land allocated by government had been usurped by individuals.

    They said land grabs have severely affected the Omufituwekuta and Okongo community forestry projects, as well as the Okongo Conservancy, where the illegal fencing off land is the order of the day.

    Okongo project chairperson, Martha Kapembe, and Omufituwekuta project chairperson, Raimi Angula, reported to Shifeta that despite community awareness meetings which highlighted that no new farms should be established, people ignored this and the forest has now been demarcated into private farms.

    “We are faced with a challenge of people grabbing conservation land and they are erecting fences. These people are doing so without consulting us and it is very difficult for us to handle it because they are claiming they were allocated land by authorities,” Angula said.

    She said in the past people use to graze freely in the Omauni forest, but currently there is no more free grazing as the forest has now demarcated as private land.

    Senior game guard at the Okongo Conservancy, Isack Nyaanya, said that cases of human-wildlife conflict are very high and they use the money generated from the conservancy to compensate those who have suffered the damages.

    “The wild animals that we have in the conservancy destroy people's mahangu fields and we have to compensate them. Our conservancy was only given kudu and eland, but there are also wild dogs that are naturally from the area. Sometimes they attack human beings and livestock and we compensate people using money we generate from our activities,” Nyaanya said.

    The Okongo constituency councillor Fanuel Ndadi said all their woes have been reported to government, but nothing was done.

    “I am urging the government to respond quickly to the conservation areas demands. These people are willing to conserve for the benefit of their communities, but they are faced with tough challenges. We have to protect the forest and share resources. For now, other farmers also have nowhere to graze,” Ndadi said.

    Shifeta urged the traditional authority to address these issues as a matter of urgency.

    He said the traditional authority is responsible for land allocations, but he is not convinced they are the ones allocating conservation land.

    Shifeta said this is the main reason many Namibians are now forced to find grazing in Angola.

    “I am not pleased by the reports of conservation land grabbing, but I am also not convinced the traditional authority, who is the custodian of land allocation, are the ones that are allocating people conservation land. I am urging the traditional authority to follow this up and administer the law. The community forestry is there to be shared by the community, but not to be fenced off by individuals setting up their farms.”

    Shifeta said this is the reason why cases of human-wildlife conflict are increasing.

    The Oukwanyama Traditional Authority was represented by senior councillors Victor Weyulu and Nghidinihamba Urias Ndilula, who promised to take the matter up with Queen Martha Mwadinomho Kristiaan Nelumbu.

    “These conflicts are caused because of competition between the growing human population and wildlife for the same living space and resources. Many wild animals are destroyed in retaliation for incidents of human-wildlife conflict. This may eliminate the species and affect the ecosystem and home ranges,” Shifeta said.

    He also handed over 50 water tanks and 100 mahangu storage facilities he said will be used to mitigate and prevent human-wildlife conflict.

    “We are here today to hand over equipment that will be used for mitigating and preventing human wildlife conflict, particularly the conflict caused by elephants. The equipment is not meant to replace or compensate those who have suffered damages to their equipment by elephants. It's meant to be used by those affected by the conflict to prevent such conflict from occurring again. We are not compensating at all,” Shifeta added.

    ILENI NANDJATO

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    Media freedom plunge irks govtMedia freedom plunge irks govt Government is committed to investigating the country's slide from the top spot as Africa's freest media and is eager to do what it takes to reclaim the top title.

    In an apparent turnabout from the vice-president's Workers' Day speech, information minister Stanley Simataa issued a statement where he not only praised the media, but undertook to ensure its rights.

    “It is sad that our country has lost its position on the African continent as a champion for media freedom,” Simataa said. Simataa was referring to the plunge to second spot late last month in the 2018 Reporters Without Borders Press Freedom Index.

    Simataa said despite government's stated commitment and willingness to work with the media, “we are cognisant of the fact that in spite of our achievements in advocating for media freedom, more still needs to be done”.

    He said in terms of the global press freedom rankings, government is keen to “objectively analyse the reasons for such a decline and further devise and appropriate intervention strategy with the indulgence of all stakeholders so as to reclaim our number one spot on the continent”.

    In 2017, Namibia dropped by seven points from 17th to 24th place globally, but still retained its top spot as Africa's freest press.

    The 2018 index saw Namibia move further down the line to 26th place, and Ghana gain the top spot as Africa's freest press. Media activists and experts argued that one of the issues that contributed to the tumble is the lack of a long promised access to information law, which likely played a significant role in the loss of three points and the fall in the global ranking. Simataa yesterday reiterated that government cannot be complacent in protecting media freedom, and against that background, stakeholders have worked “tirelessly” to “expedite the enactment of the access to information legislation”.

    “Once enacted, this legal framework will consolidate our foothold as one of the countries in the4 world with truly empowered citizens.”

    Simataa cautioned that Namibians can “only build a better nation and a better world for all, if everyone's rights, including that of the media, are guaranteed”. Simataa praised the media for their “unwavering and unbreakable spirit” and said it has worked to provide a voice for the voiceless “in its toil to expose corrupt practices and administrative malpractice, which if not exposed, could be detrimental to the growth of society”.

    He said the ministry and government are aware that for the media to be able to fulfil their role, a favourable policy and legal environment is required, as stipulated in the constitution.

    “Thus we reiterate our commitment to the defence and protection of the rights of journalists in Namibia and beyond.”

    He reiterated government's willingness to “interact with the media and allow for the recognition of the law that governs the operations of journalists in our country”.

    JANA-MARI SMITH

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