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Tells it All - Namibian Sun

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    Kalkfeld's future on the     lineKalkfeld's future on the lineResidents despondent about development prospects The village of Kalkfeld in the Otjozondjupa Region is a picture of despair and official neglect. With more than 90% unemployment at the Kalkfeld settlement in the Otjozondjupa Region, many inhabitants say the future looks bleak and they fear not only for the survival of their families but for the town itself, which is crumbling into oblivion according to residents.

    Despite some improvements in the town, specifically since last year, and attempts to draw the spotlight to the town's plight, residents worry these efforts are not enough to prevent the town's rapid decline into a bona fide ghost town.

    A long-time resident, Emmanuel Kutako, who was born near Kalkfeld close to 80 years ago, describes the town as a forgotten “island” that has been left behind since independence.

    “No one can live on an island, set apart from everything and everyone else,” he says. He feels that despite many attempts to get their problems recognised and addressed, very little is being done to help Kalkfeld.



    Where is Harambee?

    Lack of jobs, lack of local representation on the regional and national stage, little development and investment, and the inability to buy property because of the settlement status were all cited as the underlying causes for the town backsliding into a ghost town and the fact that very few pay attention to the desperate plight of the town.

    Elizabeth Harases (40), a Kalkfeld resident who was born and raised there, says the settlement is overrun with problems and the effects of 'Harambee' are still to be felt.

    “There is overwhelming unemployment. Most of the young people drink too much. And it continues to worsen, because there is very little development. Things are not really improving at the rate we need it to. There is no Harambee here,” she says.

    Although Otjozondjupa regional council chairperson Julius Neumbo last week told Namibian Sun that he had taken numerous steps to improve conditions at the town since his election one and a half years ago, residents says the pace of improvement is too slow and they fear for the future of the town.

    A common complaint is that political interest in the town dies down once elections are over.

    “They come and sit underneath the trees and talk to us. And then they are suddenly gone,” Harases says.

    She says if residents could elect men and women who live in the settlement, it might improve the way in which Kalkfeld's issues are prioritised and handled.

    Alexandrina Geises (40), who was clearing land in front of Kalkfeld's primary school in exchange for maize meal last week, agrees about the treatment from elected officials who address the town's issues from far away.

    “They only know us when elections are happening. But when we struggle, we are not seen,” she says.

    She says although 50 flush toilets were installed at selected houses last year and 50 more are being installed, more than half the town are still without proper sanitation.

    She says she and others use “the bushes” across the railway line.

    The town, which has about 5 000 inhabitants, including communal farmers from the surrounding area, has no tarred streets and very few brick structures, except for a few houses and the multimillion-dollar new tourism and business centre, as well as the fuel station.

    Crumbling old buildings dating back to the pre-independence era are dotted alongside the only tarred road, the C33, which dissects the town and connects Omaruru and Otjiwarongo.

    Many of the buildings have been occupied by squatters and their livestock, such as chickens and goats.



    Smaller and smaller

    Kalkfeld was once officially a village, but it was downgraded to settlement status in the late 1990s because of slow economic growth - a sore topic among disgruntled residents.

    The inability to purchase property due to the settlement designation is bad for investment and business, they say, and has inadvertently slowed down economic growth even further.

    The only new structures in the town are the tourism business complex and fuel station, which many claim has done little to improve the high unemployment and poverty.

    Jobs are hard to come by, with only a few businesses, including a small shop and bakery, a hair salon and barbershop, a liquor store and a few home-run businesses ensuring a trickling of income for some residents.

    Some are employed by TransNamib and NamWater, or at the clinic and school.

    For many inhabitants the lack of shops necessitates expensive shopping trips to Otjiwarongo.



    No jobs, nothing to do

    Twenty-four-year-old Chris Divanga lives on the same property as his elderly mother, Adelheid Divanga, and at last eight other family members, none of whom have a permanent job.

    Chris told Namibian Sun that he has Grade 10 and that he and many other young people are forced to “zula” for money. He said this could mean anything from collecting wood or water for a small fee, or in more desperate times, theft.

    “There is no other work available. We've heard that a mine is opening, but nothing has come of that. There are many young people in Kalkfeld that have nothing to do. Many start stealing because they and their families are hungry,” he says.

    Sometimes he does casual work at one of the nearby farms. Divanga says he is unable to leave Kalkfeld, because no one else would look after his family if he left.

    He says the lack of job opportunities and recreation can lead down a slippery slope, especially for the youth.

    “This place is very boring. There is nothing to do except to drink.”

    His mother, Adelheid, has witnessed the town's decline over the years.

    “As a child it was different here. This was a large town; there were shops and more. Now there is very little left. We have just been left here. Everything closed. We need to rebuild the town. At the moment it looks like we live on a farm. There is nothing here,” she says.

    She says the lack of shops forces the family to incur the added expense of travelling to Otjiwarongo to buy necessities such as clothing and household goods.

    A trip can cost more than N$200.

    “Life here is very difficult. There are very few jobs and money just comes in and goes out,” Adelheid Divanga says.



    A game of survival

    Hilda Kamaturiri (25), a mother of two and pregnant with her third child, says her only source of income is to zula for money, which means collecting recyclable materials or collecting wood or water for others. She charges N$5 for six pieces of wood or for fetching a bucket of water.

    Kamaturiri lives with her parents and says the town is populated by a lot of people “who struggle for money, because there is no work”.

    Errikson Haishonga (22), one of the few employed young people at Kalkfeld, describes himself as lucky to have a job.

    He was given the chance to apprentice at the small local bakery while still in school and began a permanent job there this year.

    “Many, many of the young people here don't have jobs,” he says.

    His friend, Daniel Homateni (20) works at the small chip shop and says the lack of jobs is one of the main causes of crime and alcohol abuse at the town.

    “We need more projects or development in this town to help with employment.”

    He says he doesn't see a future for the town, and if he becomes a father he would rather send his children somewhere else. “There are no opportunities for them here.”



    No land, no interest

    One of the main issues raised during a daylong visit to the community last week was the fact that the settlement is run remotely by the Otjozondjupa regional council based in Otjiwarongo.

    Many say their input in the town's government is limited and frustrating.

    “We need someone from Kalkfeld to represent us on a regional level,” says Wilfried Nuwuseb, a local businessman, who was born and raised at the settlement.

    Residents say they should be able to elect local representatives to ensure the town's interests are protected.

    A lack of investment is partially blamed on the fact that properties can only be leased, and not bought, at the town.

    “With investors, job opportunities will arise,” says Kennedy /Uirab, a self-proclaimed community activist.

    Although they expected to be rapped on the knuckles for speaking to the press, Nuwuseb and /Uirab say silence from the community will only accelerate the decline of Kalkfeld.

    “If we don't speak up, who knows what will happen to our community and to our children? The elected officials are placed in office because of our votes, they are supposed to look after us but we feel that very little is happening to help us.”

    While praise is scarce, it isn't absent. Inhabitants praise the government's drought-relief initiatives, the installation of flush toilets and the allocation of land for the construction of houses.

    Nevertheless, hope on the ground is spread thin. “Kalkfeld needs to become self-sufficient and independent in terms of leadership. We must be able to manage our own finances and determine our own future. Many of us feel neglected and forgotten,” /Uirab says.

    Nuwuseb says at the moment there is little hope for a better future unless drastic changes are made.

    “If we continue as we are doing now, with decisions made on our behalf somewhere else,

    I don't have much hope for the future. We fear for the future of the town.”





    JANA-MARI SMITH

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  • 05/25/17--16:00: More skulls to return
  • More skulls to returnMore skulls to returnAffected feel left out Descendants of the colonial genocide claim they were informed of the repatriation of human remains at the eleventh hour. The Namibian embassy in Berlin has informed the Ministry of International Relations and Cooperation that 16 human remains of Namibian origin were identified and are ready for repatriation in the coming weeks.

    The minister of education, arts and culture, Katrina Hanse-Himarwa, will be heading the Namibian delegation that will receive the remains in Germany.

    This will be the third return of human remains of victims of the 1904 to 1908 genocide and it is again not without controversy.

    Nama and Ovaherero groups say they were only informed of the return of the skulls at the end of last week and might not be able to collect enough funds or obtain travel documents to accompany the government delegation.

    Hanse-Himarwa informed the groups on 19 May and pointed out that any individuals wishing to accompany her delegation would have to foot their own bills for accommodation, meals, transport and so on.

    The secretary to the Ovaherero Genocide Foundation 1904 (OGF 1904), Utjiua Muinjangue, says they are now seeking a meeting with Hanse-Himarwa to negotiate that the return of the human remains be postponed to give them an opportunity to find funds for the trip.

    But the chairperson of the Nama Technical Committee, Ida Hoffmann, said they would not scramble around for funding “to walk with the government”.

    “We are being left behind while those are our skulls,” said an irate Hoffmann. “It is not the Namibian government that has demanded the return of the human remains. That process was started by chief Dawid Fredericks and Ovaherero paramount chief Kuaima Riruako and the cabinet against its will was forced to accept that.”

    Hoffmann said after the adoption of the genocide motion in parliament on 2006 it was not the Namibian government but groups of descendants of the genocide victims who relentlessly pursued the return of human remains and acknowledgement of and restitution for the genocide.

    “Our government did not think that we would have the endurance to pursue this matter to its final conclusion while it [Namibian government] showed no interest in it for 10 years after the adoption of the motion. I am therefore not surprised that we have not been informed well in advance of the third return of the skulls,” said Hoffmann.

    She said the Namibian government seemed less interested in the lives lost during 1904 and 1908.

    “As far as this government is concerned the only people who have died are those who perished at Ongulumbashe, during the raid on Cassinga and the FNB bomb blast [in 1988 at Oshakati],” charged Hoffmann.

    CATHERINE SASMAN

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    Time to speak up about discriminationTime to speak up about discrimination Namibians of all backgrounds are being urged to share their stories of discrimination and intolerance during a number of public and community hearings over the next two months, in an attempt to pin down how pervasive incidents of racism, tribalism, xenophobia, gender discrimination, homophobia and other related prejudicial actions against certain groups are in Namibia.

    Ombudsman John Walters says the hearings, as well as an invitation to share personal experiences on various incidents of discrimination, will help the office to pinpoint what the major fields of discrimination are and how better to provide equal access to justice to those affected.

    “We are looking at any kind of discrimination. People must lead us there. They must bring it to the fore so that we can address all types of intolerances,” he said.

    According to experts, media reports and numerous public accounts, twenty-seven years after independence intolerance still thrives in many corners of Namibia, including incidents of racism, racial discrimination, tribalism, homophobia, prejudicial acts against indigenous people, women, members of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community, as well as people living with HIV/Aids or disability and other forms of discrimination.

    And yet, access to address such incidents in the courts is often limited, due to a number of factors, including the slow pace of prosecution, the cost of lawyers, fear of retribution and a myriad of other barriers.

    “The persistence of racism, racial discrimination, tribalism and intolerance clearly demonstrates the need to look for new ways to address this problem with more resolve and with greater efficiency,” he said.

    Walters pointed out that the current racial discrimination prohibition act has not been very effective in dealing with accusations of racism or racial discrimination.

    He said a major question to address is whether the current legal frameworks provide sufficient protection of a person's right to equality and dignity and equal access to courts.

    In a concept note issued to the media, the Office of the Ombudsman said the question should be raised whether the criminalisation of racism and other forms of discrimination is the only course of action, or whether a softer, but quicker and perhaps more effective route would be to establish informal, inexpensive and user friendly tribunals.

    “Sometimes a person just wants a formal, public apology,” Walters said.

    He said these equality courts have been implemented in other countries, and have shown success in drastically cutting costs and time, and providing quick, effective justice which he yesterday dubbed “simple justice.”

    Walters said the public and community hearings will help establish how rife which forms of discrimination are in Namibia, but it can only be effective Namibians use the opportunity to come forward and actively take part.

    All submissions by individuals or groups, whether in writing or otherwise, will be handled with strict confidentiality, and could be the springboard for new and innovative ways in which to handle such incidents.

    The public hearings are slated to take place across the country throughout June and July.

    Formal hearings will take place in Windhoek from 6 to 9 June, during which a number of invited guests will make presentations to a select panel. Community hearings have been scheduled to take place in Gibeon (19 – 21 June), Katima Mulilo (26 – 30 June), Opuwo (9 – 11 July), Tsumkwe (12 – 15 July) and Gobabis (20 July).

















































    JANA-MARI SMITH

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  • 05/25/17--16:00: Ondangwa residents fed up
  • Ondangwa residents fed upOndangwa residents fed up Hundreds of Ondangwa residents on Wednesday marched to the office of Oshana regional governor Clemens Kashuupulwa to demonstrate against the government's refusal to establish a referral hospital at their town.

    The health ministry had earlier indicated that Ondangwa was an ideal location for the construction of a district hospital.

    However, these plans have been shelved and a state-of-the art referral hospital will now be constructed at Ongwediva.

    Kashuupulwa was not around to receive the petition and this irked the residents.

    His personal advisor, Michael Mwinga, received the petition on his behalf.

    The chairperson of the Ondangwa Urban Constituency Youth Forum, Paulus Nuuyoma, said his town was suffering because development projects were being diverted to other towns.

    “It is enough now. Either they construct that planned referral hospital in Ondangwa to replace the cancelled district hospital or it must not be constructed in Oshana Region at all.

    “We already availed the land and government has already spent money in surveying and testing it. We want President Hage Geingob to intervene in this matter,” Nuuyoma said.

    He challenged Geingob to determine whether Kashuupulwa was indeed acting within the parameters of the Public Service Charter.

    “It is now 27 years after independence, but there are no significant government development facilities in Ondangwa. All the government services in the region are either in Oshakati or Ongwediva. We are tired of this and we want President Geingob to answer us,” he said.

    “We came all the way from Ondangwa to see him (Kashuupulwa), but here we are only received by his advisor. We wanted to see him personally so that we give him our petition addressed to the president.”

    Mwinga told the protesters that Kashuupulwa was out of office because of official duties.

    “We were very shocked to hear from this meeting that our planned district hospital has been cancelled.

    “We first came to know about it as a rumour and we wrote a letter to the governor on 8 May. Our letter got no response and then we were informed to go attend a meeting with the health minister,” Ondangwa Town Council CEO Ismael Namugongo said last week.

    ILENI NANDJATO

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    Competitive rates at motor showCompetitive rates at motor show If you're in looking for a new set of wheels, this year's Namibia Tourism Expo will be the perfect place to start, with competitive offers from Nedbank

    A vehicle offering, tailored to your needs, includes six months' free insurance, competitive prime rates, and affordable repayment options.

    “This is what at Nedbank is offering through our 2017 Motor Show that was launched on 22 May and will run until 30 June 2017,” says Amanda von Wielligh, head: vehicle finance at Nedbank.

    Challenging times are currently being experienced in the motor trade industry. It is for this reason specifically that Von Wielligh says Nedbank tailored its offer to include the competitive prime offer and flexible repayment options in a bid to stimulate the industry.

    “Our offering provides an attractive offer to potential buyers as well as our dealer network. This means that if you buy a car through the Motor Show, Nedbank will pay for the insurance on your car for the first six months. It does not get better than this,” said Von Wielligh.

    The deal is valid for 30 days after approval for new vehicles. The offer is available to Nedbank customers and others, and normal credit terms and conditions will apply.

    This year's expo will also include a Watergat where visitors will have the opportunity to taste a variety of wines that will be on offer. The Watergat will be open each day until midnight, giving visitors the opportunity to indulge.

    The Watergat tent is situated by the Old Mutual gate.

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    Shifeta plans to ban hunting photosShifeta plans to ban hunting photosGloating lion killers are harming the economy The tourism industry will bear the brunt of international outrage over photos of dead lions on Facebook, the environment minister has warned. Namibia has already started feeling the backlash from photos posted on social media of farmers gloating over dead lions that they killed illegally.

    Environment minister Pohamba Shifeta has confirmed to Namibian Sun that none of the six lions killed by farmers in the Omusati Region had been declared “problem animals”.

    Following the outcry over these photos, the environment ministry wants to ban these types of photos from being circulated on social media.

    Shifeta said he had issued a directive that photos displaying people posing with the carcasses of wild animals should not be allowed to be posted on social media. He said the ministry intended to make this a law.

    Shifeta said the ministry did not even allow trophy hunters to post photos of them posing with carcasses on social media and therefore photos of illegally hunted animals could not be allowed either.

    “I am disappointed in the attitude of these men posing with the lions and boasting after the killing. That is very uncivilised. Such attitudes have very serious and negative consequences for the tourism industry and discredit Namibia's good name and programme of conservation,” the minister said.

    He said the ignorance of these individuals might have a serious impact on Namibia's economy, since wildlife was one of the country's main tourist attractions.

    “Just one foolish guy can tarnish Namibia's name and have a huge impact on the economy. I am already receiving calls from the international community asking why Namibia is doing this. People are pointing fingers at Namibia, not at an individual.”

    He continued to say that serious steps would be taken against the farmers who had shot the lions.

    According to him police and ministry officials are already investigating the killings.

    Shifeta described the killing of six lions in recent weeks as illegal hunting, since none of these lions had been declared problem animals.

    “I am the only one that can declare an animal as a problem animal and there was never such a request made.”

    He said the investigations would establish whether there was any immediate threat to people or livestock when the lions were shot.

    The minister said if these lions had been declared problem animals, they could have been shot by trophy hunters and the money could have gone to a conservancy. “It is not that we refuse to declare an animal as a problem animal, but with a trophy hunter this money could have helped the communities.”

    He said a lion could be sold to a hunter for about N$200 000.

    ELLANIE SMIT

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    Wage bill threatens fiscal stabilityWage bill threatens fiscal stability JANA-MARI SMITH

    Government’s politically motivated refusal to thin out its costly civil service, and an 84% civil service wage bill hike over three years, could potentially lead to unpaid salaries due to empty government purses and the neglect of critical national projects meant to boost the economy.

    “The reason for this is simply that there are a number of additional financial demands on government, which if not serviced, will result in revenue collapse and ultimately an inability of government to either pay salaries or conduct other affairs,” stated a budget review, titled ‘Prioritising Personnel’, issued in the latest Democracy report.

    Compiled by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR), the review found that a major reason for the expansion of the civil service wage bill was the salary adjustments made between 2012/13 and 2014/15, in an effort to align civil service wages “to those of the private sector in order to attract and retain skills”.

    However, the IPPR found that “because of the large size of the civil service and the magnitude of the adjustment, over the three-year period from the end of 2011/12 to the end of 2014/15, the civil service wage bill expanded by 84.4%.”

    In the subsequent three-year period, the wage bill is expected to expand by another 27.8%.

    “The end result “being that in total, the civil service wage bill has doubled in the five years to 2016/17.”

    Red alarm

    The budget review described the continued increase in personnel expenditure as “highly concerning”, in particular when compared to the most recent budget where “the majority of expenditure lines have been cut, while strong growth has been seen in the line of personnel expenditure”.

    The watchdog writes in the review that the government has, due to political pressure, repeatedly “reiterated its intention to not make civil servants redundant”.

    This stance is often defended by citing the claim that public sector employment “is critical as a solution to Namibia’s high unemployment levels”.

    The IPPR however warns that political defence, “coupled with the fact that we already have an exceptionally bloated civil service, is likely to create major issues for Namibia in the long term”.

    The IPPR warns that while the civil service wage bill continues “to mop up the vast majority of the budget, directly and indirectly” critical infrastructure, including the decades long-neglected water supply troubles, and other projects that are required to create wealth, jobs and tax revenue, “becomes ever more undersupplied”.

    And while there has been insistence that a hiring freeze has been put in place, the budget documentation suggests that some 113 positions were filled in 2016/17 and that more than 11 000 positions are to be filled in the next financial year, the review stated.

    “Whether this is correct or not is currently unclear, and it appears more likely that current staffing numbers and / or budgeted staffing numbers are not correct – a potentially worrying issue.”

    The IPPR argues that creating employment directly through government “is exceptionally inefficient and the unit cost is far higher than would be the case if government finances were used to create an investment environment for businesses, to provide support for businesses and to create a conducive tax environment.”

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    Ex-governor dies after vicious attackEx-governor dies after vicious attack STAFF REPORTER

    The former governor of Omusati Region, Leonard Nangolo Mukwiilongo, has succumbed to injuries after he was brutally attacked at his Elim residence in April this year.

    Mukwiilongo died in a northern private hospital last night, his family confirmed to Namibian Sun. He was 92.

    Mukwiilongo was tortured and assaulted by six robbers who demanded from him the keys to his safe.

    His son, Tshatipamba, said the family was devastated, especially because of the manner his father died.

    “No one deserves to die like that, and he was an old man who was supposed to die peacefully,” he said.

    “He was a very strict disciplinarian who believed in what he stood for, be it politically or business-wise, and till his passing he refused to budge to unnecessary and evil approaches which took his life through armed robbery.”

    Tshatipamba said the burden his father left behind would require a person of high calibre to carry on and as his only surviving son, he couldn’t even imagine filling his father’s shoes.

    “I see heavy whirlwinds of change which he left me to face with heavy storms ahead,” he said.

    Mukwiilongo was hospitalised over a month ago after he was attacked at his Elim residence and business place.

    Six armed men had arrived at his house on 11 April at around 11:00 and found Mukwiilongo and a maid sitting outside. The robbers allegedly forced them inside the house where they demanded money.

    They then allegedly blindfolded Mukwiilongo and the housekeeper and started demanding the safe keys, which he refused to hand over to them.

    “They set fire to plastic bags and started torturing him. He was later hit in the head with a pistol,” Tshatipamba said at the time.

    The robbers then locked Mukwiilongo and the maid inside the room and tried to flee with the safe.

    “The safe was too heavy and while they were struggling to load it onto their car the maid managed to untie herself and helped to untie my father.

    “She escaped from the room through the window and ran for help. When the robbers saw the maid running, they fled and left the safe behind,” Tshatipamba told Namibian Sun.

    It was reported that Mukwiilongo had suffered serious brain damage.

    The suspects have been denied bail and the case was postponed to 31 May.

    Mukwiilongo served as Omusati governor from 1993 until 1998.

    Before that he was in exile during the liberation struggle from 1980 until he returned in 1989.

    He is survived by five daughters and one son.

    His wife predeceased him in 1997.

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  • 05/25/17--16:00: Jobless rate rises
  • Jobless rate rises Jobless rate rises Close to 350 000 unemployed in Namibia The fourth National Labour Force Survey shows that unemployment has risen by 6.1% since 2014. OGONE TLHAGE



    The Namibia Statistics Agency has revealed that about 349 383 people are currently looking for work but are unable to find jobs, resulting in an unemployment rate of 34%.

    This follows the conclusion of the National Labour Force Survey which found that the unemployment rate had increased by 6.1%.

    The NSA also found that women lag behind men when it comes to unemployment, with a significantly larger proportion of unemployed women.

    Men also appear to earn more.

    Revealing the findings, statistician-general Alex Shimuafeni said: “The broad unemployment rate among the female population aged 15-years and above is 38.3%, which is higher than their male counterparts’ rate of 29.8%.

    “Similarly, the broad unemployment rate is higher and more pronounced in rural areas for the population aged 15 years and above at 39.2%, than in urban areas where the unemployment rate is 30.3%.”

    According to him, youth unemployment also showed a slight increase.

    “During the period under review, the broad unemployment rate among the youth is 43.4%, [showing] an increase of 4.5 percentage points compared to the broad unemployment rate of 39% among the youth as reported in 2014,” he said.

    The survey also found that the Kunene, Zambezi and Ohangwena regions had the highest unemployment.

    “At the regions, the broad unemployment rates are highest in Kunene, Zambezi and Ohangwena where the rates are 52.2%, 48% and 45.4% respectively. The rate is also higher in females than males in all the regions except in Ohangwena and Omusati where the rate for females is lower than that of the males,” said Shimuafeni.

    He also noted that there was a decline in the total labour force.

    “There has been a decline in the total number of employed people in these sectors when compared to the 2014 labour force survey with 206 722 people or 29.2% employed.”

    Women earn less than men, the survey found.

    “In terms of income levels, the average wage is N$6 759 per month, an increase of N$133 since 2014 when the average wage was N$6 626. It is a bit higher for males (N$6 850) than for females (N$6 642).

    “Across industries, the average wage is N$19 907 per month, which is earned by people in professional, scientific and technical activities, while the lowest is N$1 334 per month, which is associated with the activities of households.”

    A detailed National Labour Survey report will be released on 30 June, he indicated.

    This is the fourth labour survey. The first three were conducted in 2012, 2013 and 2014.

    Significant

    Commenting on the report, Economic Association of Namibia executive Klaus Schade said the unemployment rate had increased substantially from 27.9% in 2014 to 34% in 2016.

    “The rise in unemployment was caused by the drought that resulted in job losses in the agricultural sector of more than 70 000 between 2014 and 2016. Some other sectors experienced also job losses such as the wholesale and retail trade sector of more than 30 000,” he said.

    “This is rather surprising since the sector showed stronger economic growth in 2015 (8.2%) and in 2016 (3.4%) than the economy at large. Private households employ about 7 000 fewer domestic workers than in 2014, which could be an indication of less disposable income at household level.”

    According to him, there are a number of positive aspects in the labour force report too.

    “Hotels and restaurants employed some 18 000 persons more than in 2014, advancing to one of the major employers in the country. It once again underlines how important the industry is for the economy and that we do our utmost to maintain the sector.

    “The manufacturing sector that is the focus of a number of government initiatives has added 16 000 jobs and the construction industry some 6 000.”

    The figures for the construction industry show that the completion of major construction projects and government cuts had not yet filtered through to employment levels, he said.

    “While the construction sector has shed quite a number of jobs recently, employment opportunities in the agricultural sector have certainly improved due to the good rainfalls so that the situation on the labour market is most likely not worsening this year,” Schade commented.

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  • 05/25/17--16:00: Theatre galore
  • Theatre galore Theatre galore Coming to you live from the hall near you

    The country’s oldest, most prolific and longest surviving community theatre group is expanding its much sought-after theatre activities to six regions next month.

    This tour forms part of the group’s forth ten-year cycle to focus on regional theatre, which is made possible by a generous sponsorship from FNB Namibia holdings. This is the group’s first cautious step towards serving the cultural and theatre needs of the mostly starving rural populations in all corners of Namibia north. south, east and west.

    The group will be staging a satirical stage play called ‘The Porridge Queen’, by local playwright Frederick B. Philander, at six schools in the Hardap, //Karas, Omaheke, Otjozondjupa, Erongo and Omusati regions. Philander says he is hopeful about the play’s outcome. “We are confident that we will be successful in the rural areas, like we have [performed mostly] in Windhoek’s over-saturated arts and culture activities [which] seldom reach the regions. We intend reactivating and rekindling the hidden stage talents and interest in theatre in all the [different] regions, finances permitting. We owe it to the regions,” Philander says.

    The five member tour cast commences on 5 to 13 June. Free shows will be performed at the following schools; Dr. Lemmer High (Rehoboth), PK De Villiers (Keetmanshoop), Okahandja Secondary school (Okahandja), Wennie Du Plessis (Gobabis), Kolin Foundation Secondary School (Arandis) and Oshakati Secondary School (Oshakati). This time round it an envisaged that approximately 6000 learners countrywide will benefit from the award-winning production.

    Staff writer

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    Sir Roger Moore loses cancer battleSir Roger Moore loses cancer battle Actor Sir Roger Moore, best known for playing James Bond, has died aged 89, his family has announced.

    He played the famous spy in seven Bond films including Live and Let Die and A View to a Kill.

    Sir Roger's family confirmed the news on Twitter, saying he had died after “a short but brave battle with cancer”.

    The statement, from his children, read: “Thank you Pops for being you, and being so very special to so many people. With the heaviest of hearts, we must share the awful news that our father, Sir Roger Moore, passed away today. We are all devastated,” they said.

    Sir Roger's Bond was calm and suave - a smooth operator who could seemingly get himself out of a tricky situation with ease. The veteran star, who died in Switzerland, will have a private funeral in Monaco in accordance with his wishes, his children said. “The love with which he was surrounded in his final days was so great it cannot be quantified in words alone,” read the statement from Deborah, Geoffrey and Christian. The statement added: “We know our own love and admiration will be magnified many times over, across the world, by people who knew him for his films, his television shows and his passionate work for UNICEF which he considered to be his greatest achievement.



    BBC NEWS

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    Auas excited about Isuzu takeoverAuas excited about Isuzu takeover Auas Motors has assured owners of Isuzu, Opel and Chevrolet vehicles that service plans and warranties will be honoured and parts will remain available following the withdrawal of General Motors from South Africa.

    Namibian Sun recently spoke to Auas Motors' director, Gawie Koekemoer, who moved to allay fears that General Motors' exit from South Africa would leave Isuzu, Opel and Chevrolet drivers out in the cold.

    “At the moment the impact will not be that big, as 71% of our sales are Isuzu vehicles. The change from GM to Isuzu will be beneficial. We like the fact that Isuzu is taking over. We are very delighted that the change came from Isuzu,” he said via telephone.

    Putting Opel owners at ease, he revealed that discussions were under way with Peugeot South Africa and that a final decision was expected to be made by June.

    “On the Opel side we are busy to see if the local dealers can't keep the Opel brand. An announcement is expected somewhere in June. Opel parts will be available and service plans and warranties will be in place,” Koekemoer said.

    With the announcement that Chevrolet would no longer be manufactured in South Africa, he assured Chevy drivers that there was no need for concern.

    “Chevrolet vehicles will be built and sold until the end of 2018 and there is a commitment that service plans and warranties will remain in place. The good thing about Chevrolet is that they will only stop building it in South Africa and the parts will be available locally,” he said.

    He encouraged Chevrolet owners not to sell their vehicles and said a strong demand was expected for the one-ton Chevrolet bakkie, such as what happened when the Ford Bantam was phased out

    “After the announcement we have received a few calls. A few people were concerned. If you are in a rush to sell your Chevrolet vehicle obviously you will not get a good price currently.

    “But Chevrolet is not like the Hummer which is no longer being manufactured.

    People still come and ask if we have the Hummer.

    Now if you look at the Chevrolet Utility half-ton bakkie, small bakkies are popular so if you have one, you will get your money's worth.”

    Following the announcement by General Motors that it will be leaving South Africa, Isuzu will in due course purchase GM's Struandale manufacturing plant in Port Elizabeth. Isuzu has also signalled intent to acquire General Motors' minority shareholding in Isuzu Truck Manufacturing South Africa.

    It will also assume control of GM's parts distribution centre and vehicle conversion and distribution centre.

    OGONE TLHAGE

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  • 05/25/17--16:00: Putting Kalkfeld on the map
  • Putting Kalkfeld on the mapPutting Kalkfeld on the map The chairperson of the Otjozondjupa regional council, Julius Neumbo, has told Namibian Sun that re-establishing the viability and vitality of the Kalkfeld settlement is a top priority for him.

    Neumbo, who took up the position at the start of 2016, last week presented a long list of events and activities he has coordinated and managed in order to improve the town’s social and economic status.

    Among these initiatives were a mass clean-up and the installation of flush toilets to replace the old bucket toilet system, numerous personal interventions and identifying ways to promote the town.

    Among other things, he has arranged for the settlement to host major national events, including Independence Day and Heroes’ Day celebrations.

    Neumbo said hosting these events at the settlement was inspired by the desire to “put Kalkfeld on the map” and to cast a spotlight on the town’s woes and potential.

    He told Namibian Sun that the settlement was close to his heart and that “every time I meet with people I bring up Kalkfeld”.

    He described the town as a “ghost town” that many have forgotten about and said although the progress was slow, he was hopeful that these efforts would eventually pay off.

    One of the initiatives he highlighted is a campaign to install flush toilets to replace the unhygienic bucket system.

    Since late last year, 50 flush toilets have been installed, and another 50 are currently being installed.

    “This is something I am fighting for,” he vowed.

    Many of the activities were based on personal interventions and negotiations with donors to assist in a myriad of ways to assist and promote the town, he said.

    Neumbo said he was eager, in all his dealings with politicians, businessmen or others, to “expose the town and to tell others that Kalkfeld does exist in Namibia” in order to ensure investment and development opportunities.

    He said he was aware that the inability to purchase property at the settlement was problematic, but emphasised that the only way to tackle the issue was to boost in the local economy in order to upgrade the settlement’s status.

    In line with this, over the past year and a half as chairperson, he has personally reached out to local businesses in the Otjozondjupa region, not only to motivate their opening of local branches at Kalkfeld, but also to remind them of the availability of willing and able men and women who seek employment.

    He said a wholesale change of direction and upliftment of the town wouldn’t be easy and much remained to be done.

    Neumbo said his priority focus areas were the impact of free-roaming livestock, skills development, water supply and quality, health and sanitation, employment and investment.

    “I don’t believe in sitting around and waiting for something to happen,” said Neumbo, a former teacher and school principal.

    JANA-MARI SMITH

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  • 05/25/17--16:00: Putting Kalkfeld on the map
  • Putting Kalkfeld on the mapPutting Kalkfeld on the map The chairperson of the Otjozondjupa regional council, Julius Neumbo, has told Namibian Sun that re-establishing the viability and vitality of the Kalkfeld settlement is a top priority for him.

    Neumbo, who took up the position at the start of 2016, last week presented a long list of events and activities he has coordinated and managed in order to improve the town's social and economic status.

    Among these initiatives were a mass clean-up and the installation of flush toilets to replace the old bucket toilet system, numerous personal interventions and identifying ways to promote the town.

    Among other things, he has arranged for the settlement to host major national events, including Independence Day and Heroes' Day celebrations.

    Neumbo said hosting these events at the settlement was inspired by the desire to “put Kalkfeld on the map” and to cast a spotlight on the town's woes and potential.

    He told Namibian Sun that the settlement was close to his heart and that “every time I meet with people I bring up Kalkfeld”.

    He described the town as a “ghost town” that many have forgotten about and said although the progress was slow, he was hopeful that these efforts would eventually pay off.

    One of the initiatives he highlighted is a campaign to install flush toilets to replace the unhygienic bucket system.

    Since late last year, 50 flush toilets have been installed, and another 50 are currently being installed.

    “This is something I am fighting for,” he vowed.

    Many of the activities were based on personal interventions and negotiations with donors to assist in a myriad of ways to assist and promote the town, he said.

    Neumbo said he was eager, in all his dealings with politicians, businessmen or others, to “expose the town and to tell others that Kalkfeld does exist in Namibia” in order to ensure investment and development opportunities.

    He said he was aware that the inability to purchase property at the settlement was problematic, but emphasised that the only way to tackle the issue was to boost in the local economy in order to upgrade the settlement's status.

    In line with this, over the past year and a half as chairperson, he has personally reached out to local businesses in the Otjozondjupa region, not only to motivate their opening of local branches at Kalkfeld, but also to remind them of the availability of willing and able men and women who seek employment.

    He said a wholesale change of direction and upliftment of the town wouldn't be easy and much remained to be done.

    Neumbo said his priority focus areas were the impact of free-roaming livestock, skills development, water supply and quality, health and sanitation, employment and investment.

    “I don't believe in sitting around and waiting for something to happen,” said Neumbo, a former teacher and school principal.







































    JANA-MARI SMITH

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  • 05/27/17--10:36: Welwitschias win at last
  • Welwitschias win at lastWelwitschias win at last The Windhoek Draught Welwitschias gave the fans something to smile about, after beating Falcons 45-43 in Windhoek today at the Hage Geingob rugby filed.
    The game started off well for the home team as they were points ahead in the first half of a well contested game.
    However, the Falcons came back strongly in the second half of the game with tremendous display of rugby.
    The home team showed their mettle after keeping the South African team at bay within the last half of the match.
    The Namibian team coach Lyn Jones said he was happy with the way the game turned out after such a difficult round.
    “The boys were fantastic today and that is why I am so happy with what transpired in a game we had to win.
    “I hope that the boys will keep their momentum going in the next matches we have to play,” Jones said.
    Jesse Jackson Kauraisa

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  • 05/28/17--16:00: Debmarine Cup draw today
  • Debmarine Cup draw todayDebmarine Cup draw todayClubs wish for luck The tournament continues although six clubs have decided to snub the competition. Clubs taking part in the NFA Debmarine Cup will find out today who they are going to meet in the round of 16.

    The draw is taking place this afternoon at the United Nations Amphitheatre in Katutura and is likely to pit some of the top premier league clubs against each other.

    Some of the big clubs remaining in the competition have indicated that they would like to avoid facing each other this early in the competition.

    Other clubs felt that it would be great to face bigger teams this early in order to test their strength.

    “We want to go all the way to the final of this competition and that it is why it is important to play against some of the fine teams remaining in the competition.

    “I bet most of the premier league clubs want to avoid each other, but I am confident in the squad and will therefore not fear anyone,” Civics coach Donnelly Nell said.

    First Division side Touch & Go's spokesperson, Jefta Gaoab, hoped that his team would avoid being drawn against premier league clubs in the second round.

    He felt that meeting top clubs could limit their chances of advancing to the quarter-finals of the tournament.

    “Whatever happens at the draw, we are ready to accept it because this is football.

    “To be honest, I think clubs all over the world always want to avoid facing bigger teams early in competitions,” Gaoab said.

    Tura Magic, Mighty Gunners, FC, Unam FC, Eleven Arrows and Civics are the favourites this early in the competition given the fact that they are premier league clubs.

    That makes Life Fighters, Young Beauties FC, and Eastern Chiefs the underdogs in the competition.

    The tournament is likely to produce upsets and unlikely heroes, as all clubs are working hard in training.

    The competition started in February with an elimination round of matches between clubs in the lower leagues.

    Despite controversy after some clubs decided not to enter in the round of 32 draw, the tournament did not fail to deliver excitement.

    Fans in Tsumeb, Otjiwarongo and Windhoek have witnessed some fine displays of talent during the tournament.

    In the bowl for the 2017 Debmarine Namibia Cup are: Mighty Gunners, Outjo Academy, Young African, Gendev FC, Rundu Chiefs, Life Fighters, Young Beauties, Unam FC, Young Chiefs, Eleven Arrows, Touch & Go, Tura Magic, Civics, Bee Bob Brothers, Eastern Chiefs and Try Again.

    JESSE JACKSON KAURAISA

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  • 05/28/17--16:00: Youth Games team announced
  • Youth Games team announcedYouth Games team announced Nine athletes will represent Namibia at 2017 Commonwealth Youth Games in Nassau, Bahamas, from 18 to 23 July.

    Boxing, athletics, cycling, and tennis are the codes that Namibia will take part in.

    Young boxers Sylvinos Tangeni Nampadhi (56kg) and Ndevelo Tryagain Morning (60kg) have been selected by their federation to represent the country at the games.

    The boxers will be travelling with their coach, Petrus Gerson.

    All nine athletes travelling to the Bahamas are between the ages of 15 and 18.

    Ivan Geldenhuys will compete in the 400m race, while Natalie Louw will be doing the long jump and high jump.

    Talented javelin thrower Johannes Smith is also among the group preparing for the prestigious games.

    The three athletes will be coached by Gerson Gawanab.

    The road cycling category will feature Charl du Plooy and Alexander Miller.

    The cyclists will be accompanied by Moolman du Toit as their coach, while Charles du Plooy will also do the technical work at the event.

    The Commonwealth Youth Games is an international and multi-sport event involving teams of athletes from the 70 Commonwealth nations and territories around the world. It was first held in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 2000 and takes place every four years. This will be the sixth edition of the Games.

    The Namibia National Olympic Committee's Joan Smit will be the head of mission.

    JESSE JACKSON KAURAISA

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    Ngowi happy with Nam progressNgowi happy with Nam progressIBF president praises Indongo Namibia is one of the few African countries that have produced more than two professional boxing world champions. The president of IBF Africa, Middle East & Persian Gulf, Onesmo Alfred McBride Ngowi, says he is happy with the progress Namibian boxing is making.

    He believes Namibia has set the bar in Africa and therefore deserves to be given credit for the amount of work it has done.

    He also sings the praises of Julius Indongo, who currently holds three world titles.

    “I do believe that Namibia has very great boxers and also hardworking promoters.

    “It has always been a pleasure visiting Namibia in order to see some of the best boxers in the world display their talents,” Ngowi said.

    The Tanzanian felt that Namibia is still to accomplish more magical things if it continues to produce fine young boxers.

    “Boxing has been able to help many people out of poverty and that is why it has always been an important sport.

    “As the IBF, we try our best to make sure that the standard of boxing keeps improving.

    “It is also important for Africa to have more world champions and that is why Namibia is making the continent proud after having produced world champions over the years.”

    Ngowi praised Namibian fans for the passion they have shown in supporting their boxers over the years.

    He reiterated that he has always appreciated the number of local supporters at boxing tournaments staged in the country.

    “The crowd makes boxing a very interesting sport, and the more they come to fights, the better the display in the ring.

    “I do believe that Namibians love boxing and that is why they are always behind their local boxers.

    “It is important that promoters keep up the good work in order to produce more stars in the future.”

    JESSE JACKSON KAURAISA

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  • 05/28/17--16:00: South Africa's record
  • South Africa's recordSouth Africa's record South Africa has been one of the football powerhouses of the continent for much of the last two decades, but has fallen on tougher times of late.

    Bafana Bafana won the African Nations Cup in 1996 on home soil, but were unable to repeat the feat when they hosted the tournament again in 2013.

    The man tasked with taking them back to the top of the pile in Africa is new coach Stuart Baxter.

    South Africa is one of only two Cosafa member countries to have won the African Nations Cup title, doing so on home soil at their first attempt in 1996. Zambia joined them with their 2012 success.

    South Africa were runners-up in Burkina Faso two years later and finished third at the 2000 Nations Cup tournament in Ghana and Nigeria.

    Bafana Bafana have also qualified for three World Cups, competing in France in 1998 and South Korea in 2002. They also hosted the tournament in 2010.

    They also won the Afro-Asian Nations Cup, beating Asian champions Saudi Arabia over two legs in 1999.

    They also hold the distinction of being the only southern African country to provide a winner of an African club competition with Orlando Pirates taking the African Champions Cup in 1995, Kaizer Chiefs the African Cup Winners' Cup in 2001 and Mamelodi Sundowns in the Champions League in 2016.

    But despite all that success, South Africa reached the final of Cosafa Castle Cup for the first time in 2002, winning the trophy with a 4-1 aggregate triumph over Malawi in the two-legged final.

    After more barren years, they claimed the back-to-back tournaments, beating old foes Zambia on penalties in the final in 2007, and running out victorious in 2008, despite fielding an unofficial 'President's XI' line-up that included players mostly from the second tier of South African football.

    They repeated that squad mix in Zimbabwe in 2009, but ended up finishing fourth after losing to Mozambique in the third-place playoff.

    They went one better with a third-place finish in Zambia in 2013, but were disappointing ousted by Botswana in the quarterfinals on home soil in 2015 and then lost in the Plate semi-finals to Malawi.

    They regained the title in Namibia in 2016, beating Botswana 3-2 in a thrilling final in Windhoek with a squad made up largely of players that would compete at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

    COSAFA MEDIA

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    Aanafaalama moKunene taya ka mona omakwathoAanafaalama moKunene taya ka mona omakwatho Epangelo otali pangele okutula miilonga oprogramma yoomiliyna 30 ndjoka ya nuninwa eyambulepo lyaanafaaama moshitopolwa shaKunene shoka sha dhengwa unene koshikukuta.



    Shoka osha tseyithwa kominista Utoni Nujoma sho a tula miilonga oprogramma tayi ithanwa Programme for Communal Land Development (PCLD) mOpuwo.

    Oprograma ndjoka oya nuninwa okuyambidhidha aanafaalama nokugandja omayakulo kaanafaalama opo uuministeli mboka wu vule okwaadha omalalakano gawo gegamenenepo nekondololo lyevi lyaayehe.

    Oprograma ndjoka yoPCLD otayi mono omakwatho gopashimaliwa okuza kepangelo lyaNamibia, oNamibia German Tehnical Cooperation oshowo European Union.

    Oprograma ndjoka yoPLCD moKunene otayi ka yambidhidha eshangitho lyevi lyaayehe ndyoka li li nale metifa oshowo oompangela dhelongitho lyevi moKunene kohi yoIntegrated Regional Land Use Planning (IRLUP).

    Oprograma yoPCLD natango otayi ka yambidhidha oompangela dhomapungulo dho(Local Level Participatory Plans (LLPP) momahala ngoka tamu kala oprogramma yoPCLD.

    Omayambidhidho ngoka taga gandjwa moPCLD otaga ka pewa oohandimwe, nenge ongundu yaantu, ihe inaku popiwa kombinga yuunene woofaalama.

    Omayambidhidho otaga pewa mboka ye na oofaalama ngele odhiimuna, iiyamakuti nenge dhuunamapya.

    Oprogramma ndjoka otayi ka yambidhidha woo pashimaliwa metotepo lyoomboola oshowo okuyambulapo ekwatonawa lyevi.



    “Aantu yomomudhingoloko oyo taya ka pewa omayambidhidho ngoka,” Nujoma a popi.

    Oonakumona omayambidhidho otaya ka pumbiwa opo ya kwate nawa iikwaniipangitho mbyoka taya pewa naashoka otashi ka kala oshitopolwa shokondalaka.

    Nujoma okwa popi kutya etulo miilonga lyomulandu ngaashi gwomayambulepo goofaalama dhoohandimwe, omikunda noohambo shoka otashi kala kala oshiwanawa na okuwete kutya otashi ka longa moshitopolwa shaKunene.

    Nujoma okwa tsu omuthindo kutya uuministeli we owa totwapo momvula yo-1990, opo wu yamukule komapulo gevi ta popi kutya uuministeli we owu na oshinakugwanithwa shokutopolulula evi nokukandula po omaupyakadhi agehe taga kwatakanithwa nevi.

    Okupitila momatulululo uuministeli owa tula miilonga ooprograma dha yoolola oopoloyeka ndhoka dha pumbwa okuyamukula komapulo guumwene wevi oshowo ompumbwe yevi kaaNamibia. Nujoma okwa tsu omuthindo kutya, oPCLD oyimwe yomooprograma dhomatulululo ndhoka tadhi ungaunga netopolo lyevi shithike pamwe.

    FRED GOEIEMAN

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