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Tells it All - Namibian Sun

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  • 03/22/17--15:00: Councils' books a mess
  • Councils' books a messCouncils' books a messInsufficient documents submitted Financial accounting at village councils and municipalities seems to be shambolic and could open up the systems to corruption and fraud. A picture of chaotic bookkeeping emerges from the audited reports of village and town councils recently tabled in parliament.

    Four financial reports for different financial years had qualified audit opinions – meaning there was insufficient evidence of transactions, inadequate disclosures, uncertainties in estimates, and insufficient documentation provided for auditing purposes.

    It speaks of assets and money unaccounted for, inventories not done, of late payments and penalties due on such late payments, unsupported adjustments and journals posted, or over- and understatements of properties. In short, it is a recipe for fraud and corruption to thrive with impunity.



    Kalkrand

    According to the report of the auditor-general on the accounts of Kalkrand for 2014 and 2015, the auditors were unable to confirm provisions amounting to more than N$2 million because of a lack of supporting documentation.

    Supporting documents were also not submitted for payments amounting to N$367 310 in 2014. The village council disclosed an amount of N$353 970 as a subsidy of electricity charges, but the auditors could not trace this amount to bank statements.

    Also in 2014, financial statements reflected N$255 088 paid for contractual work but again the auditors could only confirm N$106 800 while the rest remains unaccounted for.

    While the council claimed that N$88 040 was spent on repairs, only N$4 679 could be traced; the remaining N$83 971 is unaccounted for.

    The auditors were also unable to confirm the completeness and accuracy of acquisitions of property, plant and equipment amounting to N$101 497 during the 2015 financial year because supporting documentation was not supplied.

    S&T payments made in 2015 amounting to N$65 866 and leave gratuity of N$25 289 could not be verified.

    There was also an unexplained difference of more than N$3.5 million between the cash book and general ledger in 2015. Other unexplained differences between supplier statements and financial statements were found: N$552 205 for bulk electricity purchases and N$77 403 for bulk water purchases.

    Suspense accounts amounting to N$570 325 were not cleared and statutory deductions were not made on time in 2014.



    GIBEON

    At Gibeon the picture looks similarly dismal. For the financial years ending in June 2012 and 2013 capital projects worth N$367 310 could not be explained, suspense accounts to the value of N$658 442 (2012) and N$769 708 (2013) were not cleared, and bank reconciliations and cash books were not provided for auditing purposes.



    There was no fixed asset register in place, the storeroom was not properly administered, bank statements for the investments accounts were not provided, and there were misstatements for the purchase of bulk water amounting to more than N$1 million (2012) and more than N$600 000 (2013).



    There was a lack of supporting documents for consultancy fees of N$97 123 (2012) and N$759 534 (2013). There was no submission of approved tariffs used for private electricity supply, no submission of final provisional earnings reports, some VAT returns were not submitted, and deficits were understated.

    The Build Together programmes at both Kalkrand and Gibeon were not properly administered.



    MUNICIPALITIES

    While municipalities seem to be run in a less chaotic fashion than village councils, there still remain huge anomalies in the manner financial accounting is conducted.



    OUTJO

    For the financial year that ended in June 2015 the Outjo municipality did not repay external government loans of more than N$2 million.

    The council wrote off more than N$22 million in bad debt, which includes more than N$1.7 million due to fraud in earlier years.

    There was an unexplained difference of N$95 584 between earning reports and the payroll stated in financial statements. Bonus expenses of N$206 364 could not be explained and no supporting documents were supplied.

    Close to N$3 million in deposits could not be linked to debtors and inventories worth more than N$73 000 could not be verified.

    Housing fund advances of more than N$6 million were outstanding and consumer deposits for services were insufficient to cover monthly service fees.



    GOBABIS

    For the financial year ending in June 2015 the Gobabis municipality made provision for bad and doubtful debts of more than N$28 million. A significant portion of the debt was handed over to lawyers for collection, though.

    There was, however, an understatement of the provision for doubtful debts by more than N$1.2 million.

    There were no supporting documents for material adjustments amounting to more than N$22 million, inventories were not properly conducted, and the municipality did not provide meter readings which formed the basis for electricity expenses for own consumption amounting to close to N$1 million.

    CATHERINE SASMAN

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Suburbs ready for Wanderers
  • Suburbs ready for WanderersSuburbs ready for WanderersTop clash awaits fans The rivalry between FNB Western Suburbs and Wanderers is likely to ignite tomorrow's match in Windhoek. FNB Western Suburbs spokesperson Walter Don says his men will go into tomorrow's match with the desire and will to get results.

    The Khomasdal-based side has a date with in-form FNB Wanderers at the Wanderers Stadium tomorrow at 15:15.

    The club faces serious selection problems as some of its players are away preparing for the Currie Cup.

    The team will also be without scrumhalf JC Winckler, who is nursing an injury, while Russell van Wyk is out because of family commitments.

    “The Khomasdal boys may be missing some of their players, but the remaining guys are more than prepared for the match,” Don says.

    “We know that Wanderers are on form and it is going to be an extremely difficult match for us.

    “Travelling to Pionierspark and facing a club that has won two games in a row makes us the underdogs.”

    Suburbs will go into the match after having suffered a defeat in their opening match of the season. On the other hand, the club will inspired by last weekend's performance when they defeated Rehoboth 38-34 away from home.

    Wanderers appear to be unstoppable this season, with back-to-back victories. But coach Charl du Toit is wary of the Suburbs threat and will not allow his players to be complacent.

    “Our preparations for this game have gone well all week and this gives us a boost of confidence ahead of the match.

    “We are aware that Suburbs are a great team with good players capable of stealing the points from us.

    “The good thing is that we do not have any injury worries besides the players who are on national duty,” Du Toit said.







    JESSE JACKSON KAURAISA

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Gaoab tears into NPL leaders
  • Gaoab tears into NPL leadersGaoab tears into NPL leaders First Division club Benfica's spokesperson Jefta Gaoab is dismayed that the new Namibia Premier League (NPL) interim management committee continues calling for the postponement of the NFA Debmarine Cup.

    In a letter written to all the clubs by league administrator Tovey //Hoebeb, the committee announced that the season would kick off on 12 May.

    The committee also asked all clubs to consider requesting the postponement of the NFA Debmarine Cup scheduled for 23 April.

    The move by the NPL was allegedly prompted by the fact that clubs will get more time to prepare for the round of 32.

    “I think the request from the interim NPL leadership to postpone the Debmarine Cup is totally uncalled for and demonstrates clear selfishness,” Gaoab said. “It's a one-sided request only looking at the interests of the NPL teams.

    “We are also affiliates to NPL. Maybe they deliberately forget that or turn a blind eye.

    “What do they think about other teams that already have played [first and second division]?” Gaoab said.

    He insisted that the competition must proceed with or without the NPL teams.

    “They cannot come and hold the competition hostage because of their selfish interest which is one sided. Excitement has been created and we can't allow it to be postponed.”

    The NPL interim committee could not be reached for comment.

    JESSE JACKSON KAURAISA

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    Fredericks urged to step asideFredericks urged to step aside‘Disturbing integrity-linked accusations’ Although Fredericks has withdrawn from his International Olympic Committee duties, he retained his active IAAF roles pending an investigation into irregularities in the selection of an Olympic host city. NAMPA / AP



    IAAF Council member Frank Fredericks has been urged by a colleague to step aside from the athletics governing body's work.

    European Athletics president Svein-Arne Hansen's call to Fredericks on Wednesday came three weeks before track and field's ruling council meets in London under IAAF president Sebastian Coe.

    Hansen described "disturbing integrity-linked accusations" about Fredericks in a report this month by French newspaper Le Monde.

    Although Fredericks withdrew from his International Olympic Committee duties - ahead of a likely provisional suspension - the four-time Olympic silver medallist from Namibia retained his active IAAF roles.

    "In my personal opinion," Hansen wrote in a statement, "any individual who finds themselves under such suspicion now or in the future should step aside from all their sport-related duties until the issue is resolved as it is not good for the organisation they serve.

    "I expect the IAAF to follow its regulations strictly and come to a decision on the matter at hand as quickly as possible so that, whatever the findings, both credibility and trust can be restored."

    If the allegations against Fredericks are true, it would be "an extremely disappointing betrayal of athletics," Hansen wrote.

    The claims by Le Monde spun off a wider French investigation into the previous IAAF leadership regime which allegedly blackmailed athletes and covered up doping cases. Much of the reported evidence is linked to Russia.

    Fredericks, a longstanding IOC member, received a bank transfer through an offshore company of almost $300 000 on the day in October 2009 that Rio de Janeiro was elected to host the 2016 Olympics.

    The money originally came from a Brazilian businessman and was channelled via a sports marketing company created by the son of former IAAF president Lamine Diack, Le Monde reported. Papa Massata Diack was an IAAF marketing consultant and has since been banned for life by the governing body.

    Fredericks has denied wrongdoing, and said he had a contract in 2009 with the sports marketing company. He reported details of the case to ethics commissions at the IOC and IAAF.

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Harders Cup is here
  • Harders Cup is hereHarders Cup is here SPORT REPORTER

    Sponsors of the inaugural Harders Cup have appealed to football fans to attend the tournament in large numbers.

    The Standard Bank-sponsored tournament starts today and will continue tomorrow at the Lüderitz Sports Stadium.

    “There’s no love like the first. Whether it’s your first love, your first car... or in Standard Bank’s case, our first commercial branch in Namibia,” says Standard Bank board member Birgit Eimbeck.

    “Our very first branch and first love for Standard Bank was established right here in the heart of Lüderitz 102 years ago.

    “It is in this context that our sponsorship towards the Harders Cup 2017 in Lüderitz is of great significance.”

    Eimbeck says the bank was constantly driven to contribute to the positive development of sports in Namibia, hence its platinum sponsorship of N$100 000 towards the event.

    “We value the importance of such a football spectacle towards the social and cultural upliftment of my birth town, Lüderitz.

    “Soccer, as we all know, not only serves as a unifying factor for all Namibians to come and enjoy the most loved sport together under one platform, but it also helps to support the development of the players’ abilities,” Eimbeck says.

    The winning team will walk away with a cash prize of N$100 000, while the runners-up will take home N$50 000. The team that finishes third will receive N$20 000 for their efforts. All participating teams will get new kit and N$5 000.

    MTC spokesperson Tim Ekandjo thanked the bank for the sponsorship.

    “The community of Lüderitz faces tremendous socio-economic challenges rooted mainly in a lack of sufficient economic activities.

    “The event gives them something to look forward to, recognise and display their skills and realise their own dreams,” Ekandjo said.

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Collina speaks for referees
  • Collina speaks for refereesCollina speaks for refereesCalls for steps against abuse Respected former referee Pierluigi Collina has expressed concern over the way match officials are treated by footballers and fans. NAMPA / REUTERS



    Pierluigi Collina, the chairman of the FIFA Referees Committee, has warned of a global shortage of match officials if efforts are not made to tackle abuse and violence towards referees at the grassroots level.

    Collina, who was in charge of the 2002 World Cup final between Brazil and Germany, said it is a "real threat" when match officials face verbal and physical abuse in amateur football.

    "It's a worldwide problem that we need to consider and we need to take (action) as soon as possible," Collina told Sky Sports.

    "We have a huge number of referees working every weekend in grassroots and amateur football. At this level there is something as a threat; it's a physical threat of violence.

    "Unfortunately, at this level, instead of paying huge respect for these unknown heroes... they are abused verbally, physically sometimes, this is a real threat."

    Collina welcomed initiatives to improve behaviour towards the officials.

    "Many national associations have launched a campaign, the FA did something like this, also UEFA and FIFA are promoting respect, not only towards referees but football," the 57-year-old Italian added.

    "I know that it won't be easy but something has to be done. Certainly top football has to give grassroots football the correct message."

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    Ekanitho lyiilonga momina yaSkorpion ZincEkanitho lyiilonga momina yaSkorpion ZincAaniilonga ya thika po-72, taya kanitha iilonga Elelepeko lyiilonga momina yaSkorpion Zinc Mine, poshilambo shonomola 112 moRosh Pinah olya pumbwa okutamekwa meendelelo opo iilonga yi lelepekwe noomvula ndatu dhili komeho nongele hasho nena ehangano ndyoka otali pata mokati komvula ndjika, noompito dhiilonga 1 500 otadhi ka kana. Uuyelel mboka owa hololwa momuknda ngoka gwa pitithwa komupopiliko gwomina ndjoka, Nora Ndopu.

    “Ekateko lyetamekitho lyiilonga otali yi moshipala opoloyeka ndjoka na otashi ka thiminika omina yipate omiyelo. Aaniilonga ya thika po-1500 otaya ka kanitha iilonga,” Ndopu a kunkilile.

    Skorpion Zinc okwa gandja po iilonga momina yonomola 112, kehangano lyedhina Basil Read Mining Namibia, ndyoka li li oshitopolwa shehangano lyaSouth Afrika lyedhina, Basil Read Holdings.

    Pauyelele mboka wa gandjwa kehangano, kali na omashina omenene ngoka gwa pumbiwa mokumina pehala ndyoka.

    Ndopu okwa popi kutya egandje po lyilonga kehangano ndyoka, olya etitha ekanitho lyiilonga kaaniilonga ya thika po-278.

    Amushanga-ndjai gwoMineworkers Union of Namibia (MUN), Eben Zarondo, okwa lombwele oNamibian Sun kutya, yo ya ndjika oonyala mevi na otaya pula kutya ehangano nali konge owala omashina ngoka taga pumbiwa, pehala lyokugandja po iilonga mbyoka shoka tashi etitha ekutho miilonga lyaaniilonga.

    “Omolwashike ya hala Basil Read? Omolwashike itaya hila omashina ngoka, sha po ongele ye na shoka taya holeke?”

    Okwa popi kutya egandjepo lyiilonga mbyoka kashi li mondjila naamboka naya pate owala omina yawo e ta ya shuna.

    Ndopu okwa popi kutya aaniilonga mboka taya kuthwa miilonga otaya ka moka uupakete wawo okuza kehangano wuli pombanda okuyeleka naashoka sha tulwa po kompango yaaniilonga na otaya ka pewa ompito yotango yokumona iilonga mehangano lyoBasil Read Namibia.

    “Basil Read Namibia otaka kuta aaniilonga ya thika po-450 momina yaSkorpion ule woomvula ndatu dhi li komeho onkene ope na ompito yokumona iilonga,” Ndopu a tsikile.

    Iilonga mbyoka otayi ka pewa owala AaNamibia naamboka taya ka talika tango aaniilonga nale yaSkorpion

    “Niitya yimwe otatu ti, otaku ka kala oompito dhiilonga dha gwedhwa podha thika po-172 uule woomvula 3.”

    “ Elelo lyaSkorpion Zinc otali tsikile nokuya moonkundathana naaniilonga mboka ya gumwa oshowo oMUN, nokukwatelamo moonkundathana ehangano lyoBasil Read Namibia,” Menindjela gwoSkorpion Zinc, Irvinne Simataa ta ti.

    “Otatu indile aaniilonga ayehe, MUN oshowo aakwashigwana yaRosh Pinah ya longele kumwe natse pethimbo ndika opo ku vule okulelepekwa iilonga yoshilambo shomina 112. Otatu indile aakuthimbinga ayehe ya tale kombinga yonakuyiwa pehala lyoku e ta pehulilo iilonga yaSkorpion Zinc. Oshilambo shoka otashi ka lelepeka iilonga yetu noomvula ndatu.”

    Ehangano olya popi kutya olya kala nokutseyithila aaniilonga kombinga yoompito onene dhi li po opo omina ndjoka yi pate muule woomvula oonshona. Okwa ningwa omitumba dha yooloka nehangano lyaaniilonga lyoMUN oshowo epangelo.

    Ngaashi etsokumwe ndyoka lya adhika nehangano lyaaniilonga oshowo epangelo, ekutho miilonga lyaaniilonga mboka olya undulilwa komeho okuza momasiku 28 gaFebruali okuya momasiku 15 gaMaalitsa ihe natango olya undulilwa ishewe komeho sigo okomasiku 30 gaMaalitsa, opo ku vule okugandjwa ethimbo lya gwana kehangano oshowo kehangano lyaaniilonga.

    “Aaniilonga mboka ya gumwa ya thika po-13 oya tokola okuningilwa nale omakonaakono gopuunamiti, na oye li moonkundathana dhokutopoka nehangano okuya momasiku ngoka ga tulwa po,” ehangano lya yelitha.

    ELLANIE SMIT

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    Kape na oompangela dha ningwa omolwa efundja - DTAKape na oompangela dha ningwa omolwa efundja - DTA Omupresidende gwoDTA, McHenry Venaani okwa popi kutya epangelo olya ndopa okuninga oompangela mokukandeka efundja ndyoka tali dhenge onooli yoshilongo nonando okwa ningwa nale omakunkililo kutya oshitopolwa shoka otashi ka adhika kefundja.

    “Otashi kumitha okumona kutya natango epangelo otali longitha owala omukalo gwokupula aakwashigwana ya tembukile komitunda omolwa efundja.”

    Pahapu dhaVenaani, okwa li kwa pumbwa okuningwa sha opo ku kwashilipalekwe kutya omeya gefundja oga pungulwa.

    Okwa popi kutya onkalo ndjoka otayi ulike endopo lyokuninga oompangela.

    “Ope na ompito andola onene opo omeya ngoka ga pungulwe go ga vule okulongitha kaanafaalama mokutekela iimeno yawo.”

    Venaani oku wete kutya omukalo ngoka otagu vulu okukwathela mokuya moshipala onkalo yeshunitho pevi eliko lyoshilongo oshowo enduluko lyondya moshilongo ndyoka hali yiwa moshipala kefundja.

    DTA oya pula epangeo po li tule miilonga meendelelo okomitiye yooindjinia oshowo aanambelewa yetengeneko lyondjele yomeya opo ya vule okukwatela komeho ko ku kale taku pungulwa omeya ngoka gefundja ga vule okulongithwa miikunino.

    Venaani okwa popi kutya otaka popya kombinga yoshipopiwa shoka momutumba gwopashigwana, opo ya vule okukundathana kombinga yefundja na nkene omeya ngoka taga vulu okugandja uuwananwa koshigwana.

    Onooli natango otayi dhengwa kefundja sho ya mono ekuthikuthi etiyali lyomeya gefundja okuzilila muumbugantu waAngola, mehuliloshiwike lya piti.





    ELLANIE SMIT

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    Oompata kombinga yevi lyuuthigaOompata kombinga yevi lyuuthigaOonkundathana otadhi ka kandula po omukundu gwevi moshilongo Omupresidende Hage Geingob okwa taambako oompangela dhoonkundathana kombinga yoshikumungu shevi lyuuthiga, nonando epangelo olya popi kutya oompata ndhoka otadhi tula moshiponga ombili yoshigwana. Moshipopiwa she pethimbo kwa dhimbululwa Esiku lyEmanguluko moRundu, Geingob okwa pula AaNamibia yiimange kumwe nokwaadha etsokumwe moonkundathana dhevi lyuuthiga omanga inaku tulwa iiilonga omilandu omipe.

    “Kombinga yevi lyuudhiga otatu taambako omayele kehe okuza kAaNamibia ayehe opo tu adhe etsokumwe nokutula miilonga omilandu omipe mokukandula po uupyakadhi wevi. Epulo limwe tandi pula oondika kutya olye mwene gwevi lyaVenduka nomidhingoloko dhopuushiinda?” Geingob a popi.

    MuJanuari, Ominista yEvi nOmatulululo, Utoni Nujoma okwa popi kutya epangelo itali ka tala koonkundathana dhevi lyuuthiga molwaashoka otashi ka hwahwameka 'uuBantustan' nuukwamuhoko.

    Lwpokati mpoka omupopiliko gwoLandless People's Movement (LPM) Paul Thomas okwa popi kutya omapopyo gomupresidende omauvaneko gowala ngoka ga ningwa ga nuninwa okushololitha mboka taya kwatele komeho mokupula evi.

    “Inatu kala omutumba natango opo tu kundathane omapopyo ge ngoka, ihe otu wete kutya oga nuninwa owala okuya moshipala aahwahwameki yoshikumungu shevi,” Thomas ta ti.

    Omutseyi gwiikwaveta, omuprofessa Nico Horn okwa kunkilile kutya epangelo nali ilongekidhile okuya monkundathana kombinga yevi lyuuthiga nokutala nkene tali e ta pondondo yithike pamwe uuthemba waantu yomuumbugantu oshowo waantu yomonooli mboka ya tindilwa uumwene wevi lyawo pethimbo lyepangelo lyokatongotongo.

    Kombinga kutya aakwashigwana yomuumbugantu oye li mondjila sho taya pula evi lyawo lwoohekulu, Horn okwa kunkilile kutya epangelo nali ilongekidhe opo li ka mone omapopyo okuza kaantu yomonooli mboka kaye na evi omolwa oompango dhuukoloni.

    “Ope na iinima oyindji mbyoka epangelo tali ka kundathana. Owu na okutala kekalo lyaGermany moNamibia moomvula dho1800 oshowo epangelo lyaSouth Afrika mo1914. LPM na yelithe kutya ngele ota popi evi lyuuthiga ota popi shike naana na oya hala omukundu ngoka gu kandulwe po ngiini,” Horn ta ti.

    Horn okwa kunkilile kutya epangelo nali kale lyiilongekidha okwiikalekela oshimaliwa shokufuta mboka taya ningi omaindilo ngele olya tokola shili okutala koonkundathana ndhoka.

    Omunongononi gwopolotika Phanuel Kaapama okwa pandula omapopyo gomuleli ta popi kutya oonkundathana dhevi odha pumbiwa opo ku kanudlwe pomukundu ngoka.

    Okwa popi kutya oonkundathana dhoka odha simana unene sho pe na omapopyo kutya evi lyoshikunino shEtosha olyaakwashigwana yomuhoko gwAayelele, unene yoHai//om.

    “Otaku vulu okuningwa oonkundathana dhi li muuwanawa woshigwana ashihe, oshiholelwa ngele ope na omina ndjoka yi li mevi ndyoka lya talikako kutya olyaakwashigwana na ohayi gandja oshimaliwa shoobiliyona moshiketha shepangelo nena otaku ka ningwa oonkundathana ku talike moshinima shoka.”

    Kaapama oku na einekelo kutya Namibia ota vulu okukutha oshiholelwa kuSouth Afrika ngoka a tula miilonga omilandu dhi na sha nevi lyuuthiga.

    “Otatu vulu okwiilonga oshindji okuza kuSouth Afrika. Namibia ota popi kutya oonkundathana ndhoka otadhi tula moshiponga ombili yoshigwana . Natu tale kuSouth Afrika ngoka ay a monkalo ngaashi yetu ihe ye okwa tula miilonga omilandu.

    JEMIMA BEUKES

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Auntie Nangy
  • Auntie NangyAuntie Nangy Help me find a girl

    Dear Auntie Nangy, I am 24 years old and I am looking for a girl to fall in love with him or her. Contact me at this number 081 632 2676.

    To all the single ladies or single guys, this reader is looking for love and his or her number is there for you to get him or her.

    18 and hot

    Dear Auntie Nangy, I am 18 years old and there are seven boys who want me and I do not know what to do.

    You have given me skimpy information and I am not confident that I will give you the right advice. You seem to be chuffed by trivial things. What is so special about seven boys wanting you? You may feel that you are a hot chick but let me warn you that before you know it, these boys that seem to be all over you making you feel like there is no other, will screw and dump you like a used condom. It could also mean that many boys are coming to you because they see you negatively, as a girl who is easy to chop. Take pride and don’t allow boys to see you as cheap stuff that everyone wants to lay their hands on because is cheap and easily available. Don’t see yourself as China Town where everyone wants to enter but choose to be Stuttafords that sells quality and expensive merchandise that only a selected few can afford.

    I’m crazy about him

    Dear Auntie Nangy, I’m a 22-year-old lady and I am in love with a guy who is working at the same place with me but not at the same company. We get along very well but I don’t have the courage to tell him how I feel about him. He is in a relationship so what can I do about it please.

    The bible says it is a sin to admire your neighbour’s wife and guided by this biblical principle even though this guy is not married yet to the other lady, I advise you to rather suffer in silence. Such is life that often you die to lie in the arms of a man who is not yours but if you have a conscience, you just have to suffer in silence. Maybe, the best thing that you can do is to hope that the guy’s current romance will end and only then, can you get closer and see if the guy has the same feelings that you have for him. What does it help to count sheep at night over a man who is not turned on by you even if you sit on his lap naked? For now, just swallow the bitter pill and continue wishing.

    Scared about periods

    Dear Auntie Nangy, I am a girl aged 14, and I have not yet started with menstruation. But, I sometimes think that I see something on my panty. I am afraid to start menstruation while I am in class. Please Auntie Nangy, help me.

    Your fear is common and many girls suffer from the same problem. The reason why many girls are scared about their first period is due to lack of knowledge. In these days where our mothers are now working mothers and aunties remain in the village, the valuable lessons about this important stage are no longer given to many girls. That fear has a name and it is called Menophobia. In fact you have every reason to be happy because it is a good sign and shows that you have grown up and that your body is fertile to bear children. The fear can also come from stories you hear from friends about painful periods. Because your body is going through many changes sometimes you get mood swings, go through phases of weepiness or anger, and bloating and swelling of the abdomen and legs. All these are common. These all contribute to a feeling of fear about menstruation.

    Bring them back

    Dear Auntie Nangy, what happen to the cell pals? Please we want the cell pals back or come up with something else please.

    Yes cell pals were very popular and we wish we could bring them back. However the challenge that came from the cell pals is that criminals were using the platform to lure innocent boys and girls some of who became victims after they responded to messages published on cell pals. We became part of the problem of increasing sex and gender based abuse and that is why we stopped them.

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Joe Mafela remembered
  • Joe Mafela rememberedJoe Mafela rememberedA trailblazer for SA theatre gone too soon Legendary actor and celebrated industry veteran Joe Mafela passed away in a car accident on 18 March 2017. Mafela, popularly known as Sdumo, was 75. Veteran South African actor Joe Mafela is affectionately remembered for conceptualising and starring in early Chicken Licken television advertisements, and writing the “It's good, good, good, it's good, it's nice” jingle in 1986. His most memorable role in acting will be credit for his portrayal of the character of Sdumo on the isiZulu sitcom Sgudi 'Snaysi, which was very popular in the 1980s and early 90s.

    Many South African celebrities, politicians and fellow actors reacted to Mafela's death with many outpouring messages of condolences.

    Veteran Namibian actor, David Njavera, credits Mafela as someone who paved the way for many actors across Africa and as a mentor that many actors aspired to be. “As an actor he has mentored most of us that call the fraternity a career today. He has shown and taught us that it pays to be professional and hardworking,” said Ndjavera. Ndjavera says Mafela will be remembered for his portrayal of the characters he played and his career ethics. “His naturalistic approach to the character and his portrayal of subjectivity in the delivery of issues pertaining to human conflict and behaviour was tops. He was an educator and entertainer. His career ethics to be lived by would be that people should never short-change themselves and that all should value their beings as equal to all,” said Ndjavera.

    Mafela was an actor, comedian, songwriter and film producer with a brimming bag of accolades.

    Last year, he was honoured with a Life Achiever's Award for his contribution to South African television and arts in general.

    June Shimuoshili

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Roll with the punches
  • Roll with the punchesRoll with the punches The world does not owe you anything. You get people who walk around like they deserve to be compensated for breathing and waking up today. They expect us to feel sorry and pity for them. People expect us to look up to them and obey their every command and jump when they tell us to do something. These people expect us not to question their authority. You are not important honey! Don't take yourself so seriously. Sit back, laugh, live and just enjoy every moment that comes.

    Stop complaining and start living. Life is not flawless and it is not a textbook. It never has been and will never be. In fact, once we begin to cuddle this reality, we welcome a myriad of possibilities. Life is never perfect. We know this is a hard fact. We complain about the weather, the traffic, and we complain about complaining. We complain about tight clothing, misplaced keys, late appointments, and the price of petrol or diesel. We complain about our jobs or our lack of jobs. We complain about nosy neighbours, loud mouths, ungrateful teenagers, and lazy spouses. We have become a society too quick to complain and judge. For once, just shut up and take the chill pill. Bly in jou baan and just do you. There are numerous benefits to fewer complaints. It shifts our focus to the positives. It allows gratitude to take root and manifest. And, cheerfulness can be an excellent beautifier. Sometimes the pressures of life get to us and we vent and express ourselves through complaining. Stop worrying about things, if it happens it happens for a reason and there is nothing you can do. Rather spend your time and energy that you spend on complaining on fostering positive aspects of your life, your negative tone will just get to you and cause you unnecessary stress.

    Stuff will on no occasion, work out as we plan, and we will always have a motive to be discontented. The issue comes when our internal and external complaints impact our ability to have truly happy and fulfilling lives. When this becomes reality, it is time to learn how to stop complaining and start living.

    Live!! Take the punches, get back up and just like that Aaliyah classic song “Dust yourself off” and keep it moving bubu.

    Learn to close the door on past iniquities and disappointments. As long as you are holding the door open, you cannot move to the next one. You need to open new chapters in your life - but if you continue reading the current one, it is unlikely that you will open a new page.



    june@namibiansun.com

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    Aahingi yootaxi oya hala egameno lyopavetaAahingi yootaxi oya hala egameno lyopaveta Aahingi yootaxi moVenduka oya ningi ehololomadhilaadhilo esiku Etiyali poombelewa dhUuministeli wAaniilonga moonkambadhala opo omakemo gawo ga talike.

    Ehangano lyoNamibia Transport and Taxi Union (NTTU) olya tamekitha ehololomadhilaadhilo ndyoka lya tameke mOmaandaha na oya gandja omukandanyenyeto gwawo kuuministeli mboka , moka ya popi kutya aaniilonga mboka moNamibia oye li onga aapika.

    Omupresidede gwehangano ndyoka, Werner Januarie, okwa popi kutya otaya tsikile nokuninga omahololomadhilaadhilo sigo omakemo gawo ga talika.

    Januarie okwa lombwele oNamibian Sun kutya ehololomadhilaadhilo lyawo otali tsikile sigo omEtine (ohela) ngele inaya mona omayamukulo komapulo gawo.

    “Inatu mona natango omayamukulo ihe otu na einekelo kutya otaye tu galukile.”

    Momanyenyeto gamwe po ngoka ga tothwamo kaaahingi yootaxi ongaashi kutya otaya ihumbatelwa nayi kaagandji yawo yiilonga, noshilonga sha simana shoka taya longo moshigwana inashi talika.

    Januarie okwa popi kutya aaniilonga mboka ihaya pewa oompango dhiilonga dhili nawa, na ohaya ihumbatelwa nayi kaagandji yawo yiilonga.

    Oya hala opo ku tulwe po opresenda ndhotumba dhiifuta yawo oshowo yap ewe egameno kohi yOmpango yAaniilonga.

    Januarie okwa popi kutya ehololomadhilaadhilo lyawo, oli li oshizemo shomutumba ngoka ya ningi momasiku 10 gaMalitsa ngoka gwa tsu kumwe opo ku tseyithilwe epangelo kombinga yelundululo lyoondjambi dhaaniiilonga mboka, ya vule okukala taya futwa oopresenda 40, ndhoka tadhi ka vulitha oondjambi dhawo komwedhi dhi kale pooN$4 000.

    “Otwa kala pokomisi yoopresenda 30 uule wethimbo, ngashiingeyi otwa hala oondjambi dhi gwedhelwe oshowo onkalo yetu yiilonga yihwepopekwe tse tu tyapule oonkalo yiilonga yanawapala ngaashi aaniilonga ayehe miikondo ya yooloka moshilongo.”

    Oshinima shimwe aahingi yootaxi ya hala etulo miilonga lyomulandu gwiiyenditho yaayehe. Omulandu ngoka ogwa li gu na okutulwa miilonga momasiku 31 gaJanuari nuumvo ihe shoka inashi ningwa.

    ELLANIE SMIT

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    Oil market remains under pressureOil market remains under pressureShale oil keeps the supply high Opec is finding the going tough as US-based producers of shale oil continue to produce. Oil prices yesterday recovered from losses chalked up the session before, but the market remains under pressure as bloated US crude inventories and rising output dampen Opec-led efforts to curb global production.

    Prices for front-month Brent crude futures, the international benchmark for oil, were at $50.95 per barrel at 00:33 Greenwich Meridian Time, up US$0.31 from their last close. That came after Brent briefly dipped below $50 a barrel the previous session for the first time since November.

    In the United States, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were up US$0.33 at $48.38 a barrel, after testing support at $47 a barrel overnight.

    Despite the bounce yesterday, traders said that prices remained under pressure, largely due to a bloated US market and doubts that an effort led by the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (Opec) to cut output were having the desired effect of reining in a global fuel supply overhang.

    Greg McKenna, chief market strategist at futures brokerage AxiTrader, said Opec was “underwriting the investment plans and returns of their competition in US shale oil.”

    McKenna said there was a risk of oil prices dropping further due to US output and a lack of compliance by some producers who said they would cut production.

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) said US inventories climbed almost 5 million barrels to a record 533.1 million last week, far outpacing forecasts of a 2.8 million-barrel build.

    The high inventories come as US oil production has risen over 8% since mid-2016 to more than 9.13 million barrels per day (bpd) to levels comparable in late 2014, when the oil market slump started.

    NAMPA/REUTERS

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    DBN seeks coastal opportunitiesDBN seeks coastal opportunitiesN$280 million advanced to Erongo RED The coast is brimming with opportunity and the Development Bank of Namibia stands ready to provide financing, says Erongo portfolio manager Simeon Kahona. The Development Bank of Namibia's Erongo portfolio manager, Simeon Kahona, says the bank is seeking opportunities to finance business development in the Erongo Region.

    In terms of the bank's additional focus on infrastructure and business projects, identified in the Harambee Prosperity Plan (HPP), it will seek out projects promoted by private entrepreneurs, through public-private partnerships (PPPs), as well as projects identified by the regional council and local authorities.

    The bank will also seek to finance projects that are unique to the economy of the Erongo Region.

    Talking about the requirement for energy noted in the HPP, Kahona says the bank has advanced N$280 million to Erongo RED to ensure electricity supply.

    Financing was also advanced for a solar project at Arandis and a bulk-fuel-supply project.

    Other projects that the bank envisages financing are local authority projects, through PPPs, to develop land for affordable housing.

    Kahona adds that the bank will also finance social infrastructure in Erongo, noting that economic development should be accompanied by socio-economic development if greater levels of economic activity are to be of benefit to citizens of the region. Kahona says the region has the potential to strengthen its economy to serve the needs and wants of its enterprises.

    The DBN believes there is opportunity to finance a light engineering industry that services marine enterprises; the transport and logistics sector; the developing energy sector; and the marine products processing subsector. These projects could have a projected annual turnover of N$10 million or more. In terms of local consumer demand, the DBN has granted a N$25 million loan to African Deli, an enterprise established to manufacture instant meals with an African flair. This, Kahona says, shows that there is potential in Erongo to fulfil regional demand that can extend nationally and further into the Southern African Development Community market.

    Kahona says Erongo is a region that keeps on giving to Namibia's national economy, and the bank treats it as a gateway for development in view of that. In the period between 2004 and January 2017, the bank has provided financing of more than N$4.4 billion to the region. The majority of that, N$3.3 billion, was allocated to the transport and logistics sector. That was followed by a N$451 million allocation to the electricity sector and N$197 million to business services.

    STAFF REPORTER

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    Pick n Pay Otjiwarongo closed indefinitelyPick n Pay Otjiwarongo closed indefinitely Pick n Pay Namibia has announced the closure of its Otjiwarongo supermarket by the end of the month.

    The shop has served the Otjiwarongo community for more than 16 years.

    Its closure was necessitated by lengthy renovations of the building where it is located.

    Pick n Pay Namibia managing director Norbert Wurm says the property owner informed the company that the renovations would start in April and continue at least half a year.

    “Following the announcement by the property owner of the planned renovations and construction of the shopping centre, and taking into consideration the safety of our employees and customers coupled with the shopping experience, Pick n Pay was left with no other option but to close the store for the foreseeable future until such time construction is completed, the date of which is undetermined at this stage,” Wurm says.

    The company has taken steps to minimise the repercussions of this decision on the lives of the shop's 75 employees.

    “These will include absorbing and transferring staff into current and suitable vacancies within Pick n Pay. Staff will also be offered retrenchment packages while they will also be advised of any future vacancies for which the affected parties are required to follow the standard job application process.”

    Wurm says PnP will continue to add value to the Namibian economy through upgrading its shops, expanding its footprint throughout the country and creating jobs in the process.

    “The recent relocation of the Oshikango store confirms our commitment to upgrading our customer experience and delivering quality to our customers. Customers can also look forward to the opening of a new Pick n Pay store at the new Dunes Mall in Walvis Bay this year,” he says.

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Trump man worked for Putin
  • Trump man worked for PutinTrump man worked for PutinCampaign chairperson for Trump advanced Putin's interests It has emerged that Paul Manafort, campaign chair for Donald Trump, for years worked to advance the interests of Russian President Vladimir Putin. President Donald Trump's former campaign chairperson, Paul Manafort, secretly worked for a Russian billionaire to advance the interests of Vladimir Putin a decade ago and proposed an ambitious political strategy to undermine anti-Russian opposition across former Soviet republics, The Associated Press has learned.

    The White House on Wednesday acknowledged the AP's revelations had “started to catch a lot of buzz” but brushed them aside.

    Manafort proposed in confidential strategy plans as early as June 2005 that he would influence politics, business dealings and news coverage inside the United States, Europe and the former Soviet republics to benefit the Putin government, even as US-Russia relations under Republican President George W. Bush grew worse.

    Manafort pitched the plans to Russian aluminum magnate Oleg Deripaska, a close Putin ally with whom he eventually signed a US$10-million annual contract beginning in 2006, according to interviews with several people familiar with payments to Manafort and business records obtained by the AP.

    Manafort and Deripaska maintained a business relationship until at least 2009. White House spokesperson Sean Spicer indicated on Wednesday that President Trump had not been aware of Manafort's work on behalf of Deripaska.

    “To suggest that the president knew who his clients were from 10 years ago is a bit insane,” Spicer said. He noted the AP's reporting “has started to catch a lot of buzz” but said Manafort's work occurred long before he became Trump's campaign chairman.

    “I don't know what he got paid to do,” Spicer said, adding,

    “There's no suggestion he did anything improper.”

    Manafort's plans were laid out in documents obtained by the AP that included strategy memoranda and records showing international wire transfers for millions of dollars. How much work Manafort performed under the contract was unclear.

    The disclosures come as Trump campaign advisers are the subject of an FBI investigation and two congressional inquiries.

    Investigators are reviewing whether the Trump campaign and its associates coordinated with Moscow to meddle in the 2016 campaign, an allegation that Manafort has dismissed as politically motivated.

    Manafort confirmed in a statement to the AP he worked for Deripaska in various countries but said the work was being unfairly cast as “inappropriate or nefarious” as part of a “smear campaign.”

    Meanwhile, Senator John McCain called the disclosures “serious stuff” and more evidence that an independent congressional committee should investigate the Trump administration. “Other shoes will drop,” McCain said.

    Deripaska became one of Russia's wealthiest men under Putin, buying assets abroad in ways widely perceived to benefit the Kremlin's interests. US diplomatic notes from 2006 described Deripaska as “among the few oligarchs Putin turns to on a regular basis” and “a more-or-less permanent fixture on Putin's trips abroad.”

    In response to questions about Manafort's consulting firm, a spokesperson for Deripaska in 2008 said Deripaska had never hired the firm. An official representative of Deripaska said in a statement on Wednesday: “There was an agreement between Deripaska and Manafort to provide investment consulting services related to business interests of Deripaska which now is a subject to legal claims.”

    In the US, Manafort worked as Trump's unpaid campaign chairman last year from March until August when Trump asked him to leave after the AP revealed that he had orchestrated a covert Washington lobbying operation until 2014 on behalf of Ukraine's ruling pro-Russian political party.

    NAMPA/AP

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Taxi drivers rule the world
  • Taxi drivers rule the worldTaxi drivers rule the world You have never lived as a person until you take one of those taxis that ferry people between Swakopmund and Walvis Bay. I tell you, if you ever struggled to pray, just hop onto one of these taxis and you will be saying the Lord’s Prayer in Greek!

    The drivers of these taxis, locally known as ‘Peep-peep’ from the sound of the hooter when looking for customers – have the unmatched ability to make these two coastal towns seemed like they are merely suburbs in the same town.

    Trust me; if one of them were to drive past Michael Schumacher, the German would probably think his car was moving backwards!

    But it is not only their ability to clock 180km/h in a 60km/h zone that has made this mode of transport infamously popular – it is everything about them that makes them stand head above the rest.

    For starters, they do not wait for you as a customer to choose the taxi for themselves; they decide for you. Once you get out of the local taxi to look for another that will take you to Walvis Bay, four largely built guys will be storming towards you.

    I didn’t think that was funny the first time it happened to me. I was ready to confess all my hideous dealings of the past ten years, as I saw the dudes approaching at full speed towards me. In my mind I was screaming “It was only a kiss – on the cheek” and “She told me her boyfriend was in Keetmanshoop”!

    This is apparently how they secure customers; by rushing ‘rugby style’ towards you and grabbing your belongings. The next moment you will have each one of the three bags you are travelling with in three different taxis.

    Once that happens, phase-two of ‘How to board a taxi’ kicks in. This stage is called the negotiation process, where each driver attempts to convince the other that he should have the privilege of having you as a commuter in his vehicle.

    It is funny; they do not even listen to you! It is like those tates from the village that will be deciding on the bridal price (lobola) for their most precious daughter. If she has Grade 12, completed a Damelin course and speaks moderate English – she is going to cost you an arm and a leg.

    If she is born after Namib Air changed to Air Namibia and has the amazing ability to knit and sew, chances are you would need an AgriBank loan to wed her!

    So, there you are; standing with your arms on your hips, listening to this taxi driver, then the other and the other, not knowing what to make of the situation.

    Deciding on your own is even more difficult; I am told there is more to all those taxis that appear to only needing one person before they are ready to leave for Walvis Bay. Those taxis, I am told, are full of ‘stones’ or ‘Omamanya’ and not real commuters.

    I inquisitively enquired as to how the system works from one taxi driver.

    “No my friend, those guys are ‘omamanya’. This one is ‘emanya’ and this one also (pointing to the people in the car). We only load them to fool you people into believing the car is almost full,” he said.

    The ‘stones’ will be driving around Swakopmund in the taxi looking for real commuters. If there are three ‘stones’ in a car, you would think you are the only one needed before departing. Once you get on, one ‘stone’ will get out of the car, again leaving one space.

    The process carries on until the taxi driver has filled his car. The ‘stones’ each earn about N$2.00 for their efforts. It is not much, but multiply that with the number of times the dude is prepared to act as a ‘stone’ per day and you will see the difference.

    I am told that some commuters have caught onto the trick, which forced the drivers to change to women as ‘stones’, as people are more trusting of women. One clever taxi driver has even gone as far as acquiring the services of ‘white stones’, as white people are apparently even more fool proof than women.

    In the end, it is not about working harder – only smarter, I am told.

    Until then…

    tjatindi@gmail.com

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Govt medical aid mess
  • Govt medical aid messGovt medical aid mess The precarious state in which the Public Service Employees Medical Aid Scheme (Psemas) finds itself in was this week exposed by this newspaper.

    The report, seen by Namibian Sun, concluded that the lack of adequate internal control was most commonly cited as the factor that led to the abuse of the government medical aid by both service providers and members.

    The rot at Psemas and Methealth Administrators is not new, as medical aid fraud has been on the rise in recent years.

    The high levels of fraud, waste and abuse committed at Psemas have been uncovered following an investigation by a South African firm Savvy Solutions who was brought it in to focus on forensic audit investigations aimed at identifying and curbing irregular claim activities within the scheme to reduce costs and financial loss from fraud. The detailed report containing findings is damning, as it confirms the wide-ranging fraud, which fingered various service providers as well as members who are the main culprits.

    The report, which took almost two years to complete, was submitted to the finance ministry in 2010, and shockingly nothing was done.

    Today Psemas is struggling to pay medical service providers, amounting to over N$180 million, which has led to major disruptions. In the past few months, service providers such as general practitioners, pharmacists and specialists have started tapping into their reserves to pay their workers due to the non-payment of Psemas claims. Government had known since 2010 about the goings-on at Psemas.

    However, a lax attitude toward governance prevailed, further worsening the situation. It is unacceptable that the authorities must come up with serious measures to reform Psemas even after spending millions on investigations.

    Do we have to wait for things to spiral out of control before coming up with the remedial measures that detect and eliminate fraud and dishonesty?

    The health sector is one of the most vulnerable in this country and we can ill-afford to continue to mess around with our taxpayers' money. Someone must take responsibility for a change and face the music.

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  • 03/23/17--15:00: Taxi drivers rule the world
  • Taxi drivers rule the worldTaxi drivers rule the world You have never lived as a person until you take one of those taxis that ferry people between Swakopmund and Walvis Bay. I tell you, if you ever struggled to pray, just hop onto one of these taxis and you will be saying the Lord’s Prayer in Greek!

    The drivers of these taxis, locally known as ‘Peep-peep’ from the sound of the hooter when looking for customers – have the unmatched ability to make these two coastal towns seemed like they are merely suburbs in the same town.

    Trust me; if one of them were to drive past Michael Schumacher, the German would probably think his car was moving backwards!

    But it is not only their ability to clock 180km/h in a 60km/h zone that has made this mode of transport infamously popular – it is everything about them that makes them stand head above the rest.

    For starters, they do not wait for you as a customer to choose the taxi for themselves; they decide for you. Once you get out of the local taxi to look for another that will take you to Walvis Bay, four largely built guys will be storming towards you.

    I didn’t think that was funny the first time it happened to me. I was ready to confess all my hideous dealings of the past ten years, as I saw the dudes approaching at full speed towards me. In my mind I was screaming “It was only a kiss – on the cheek” and “She told me her boyfriend was in Keetmanshoop”!

    This is apparently how they secure customers; by rushing ‘rugby style’ towards you and grabbing your belongings. The next moment you will have each one of the three bags you are travelling with in three different taxis.

    Once that happens, phase-two of ‘How to board a taxi’ kicks in. This stage is called the negotiation process, where each driver attempts to convince the other that he should have the privilege of having you as a commuter in his vehicle.

    It is funny; they do not even listen to you! It is like those tates from the village that will be deciding on the bridal price (lobola) for their most precious daughter. If she has Grade 12, completed a Damelin course and speaks moderate English – she is going to cost you an arm and a leg.

    If she is born after Namib Air changed to Air Namibia and has the amazing ability to knit and sew, chances are you would need an AgriBank loan to wed her!

    So, there you are; standing with your arms on your hips, listening to this taxi driver, then the other and the other, not knowing what to make of the situation.

    Deciding on your own is even more difficult; I am told there is more to all those taxis that appear to only needing one person before they are ready to leave for Walvis Bay. Those taxis, I am told, are full of ‘stones’ or ‘Omamanya’ and not real commuters.

    I inquisitively enquired as to how the system works from one taxi driver.

    “No my friend, those guys are ‘omamanya’. This one is ‘emanya’ and this one also (pointing to the people in the car). We only load them to fool you people into believing the car is almost full,” he said.

    The ‘stones’ will be driving around Swakopmund in the taxi looking for real commuters. If there are three ‘stones’ in a car, you would think you are the only one needed before departing. Once you get on, one ‘stone’ will get out of the car, again leaving one space.

    The process carries on until the taxi driver has filled his car. The ‘stones’ each earn about N$2.00 for their efforts. It is not much, but multiply that with the number of times the dude is prepared to act as a ‘stone’ per day and you will see the difference.

    I am told that some commuters have caught onto the trick, which forced the drivers to change to women as ‘stones’, as people are more trusting of women. One clever taxi driver has even gone as far as acquiring the services of ‘white stones’, as white people are apparently even more fool proof than women.

    In the end, it is not about working harder – only smarter, I am told.

    Until then…

    tjatindi@gmail.com

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