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Tells it All - Namibian Sun

older | 1 | .... | 1133 | 1134 | (Page 1135) | 1136 | 1137 | .... | 1152 | newer

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    Design, programme and stimulateDesign, programme and stimulateWhere technical knowledge meets passion Johann Mouton is an automation engineer at Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL) – a subsidiary of the Ohlthaver & List (O&L) Group. He strives to empower himself with the skills, knowledge and the experience needed to deliver the best possible results. Mariselle Stofberg

    Thinking outside the box, being creative, yet practical, and using logistics to turn an idea into reality, are some of the key aspects of being an automation engineer, which are all traits that Johann Mouton excels at.

    Mouton is an automation engineer at Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL), who is dedicated and motivated. Automation is the technology by which a process or procedure is performed with minimal human assistance.

    “Within this field you need to have a sound understanding of software development and computer programming. Troubleshooting and logical thinking are key, as sometimes the easiest solution is right in front of you.

    “Of course there are a few technical skills to be learned, such as instrumentation and control-loop calibration, but really understanding the process you want to automate is key,” Mouton said.

    His interest in the field has its roots in the subjects he had in high school.

    “I attended Windhoek Technical High School and had electronics as a subject, which made me realise that I wanted to pursue a career in the field of engineering.

    “After I matriculated, I took a gap year and worked as a river guide at Felix Unite on the Orange River. From there I went to Cape Town, where I completed my diploma in electronic engineering at Cape Technikon.”

    While working as a junior automation engineer at NBL, Mouton enrolled at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (Nust) to finish his degree in electronic engineering.

    “I first learned about automation when I was still studying in Cape Town and attended a short programme called Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) during one of my holidays. When I first started working it was in a completely different field, which included CCTV and access control.”

    After three years in Cape Town, Mouton moved to Namibia with the aim of working in a technical field and was employed at Namibia Diaries, a subsidiary of the O&L Group, in logistics.

    Shortly thereafter he applied for a position at NBL, where he was responsible for projects and document administration.

    “This is when I became more acquainted with the automation world and instantly knew that this is what I wanted to do. The junior automation engineering position became available, for which I was the successful candidate, and only then my journey into the automation world started.

    “Since then, automation time and time again, gave me a real eye-opener of what opportunities exist in this field,” he added.

    Within the field of automation, it is essential that one stays up-to-date with all the latest developments and available training.

    “A big part of the training involves on-the-job training, as the automation environment changes and improves daily. I also attended a few additional courses, including in programming at the Siemens head office in South Africa,” Mouton said.

    “I try and stay up-to-date with the newest technology articles, trends and latest developments, and also regularly attend automation fairs. The one thing I realised is that you never know enough, and by constantly keeping up-to-date, this has a significant advantage in my line of work.”

    Mouton describes the biggest challenge he faced in this field as the struggle to find relevant training and study opportunities.

    “In Namibia and South Africa there aren’t dedicated fields of study for automation and you are left with registering for online courses, which can be quite expensive. You also can’t register at the Engineering Council of Namibia as an automation engineer, because it is not a recognised field of engineering yet, but in South Africa it is changing, and will probably change here as well.”

    Mouton added that with all the advances in the automation field and also the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which is about big data and smart sensors, the future of automation is exciting.

    With the challenges faced and the shortcomings identified, Mouton is planning to get more involved with the Namibia Training Authority (NTA) to explore the possibly of assisting in creating dedicated instrumentation and automation fields of study.

    He is also a member of the Society for Automation, Instrumentation, Measurement and Control (SAIMC), which is trying to do the same in South Africa.

    “I’ve realised that with automation rapidly advancing and changing work environments, it is of so much more importance that students are given opportunities to advance in automation.”

    He aspires to one day climb Kilimanjaro and continue his development and growth within this exciting and continuously changing field.

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    Design, programme and stimulateDesign, programme and stimulateWhere technical knowledge meets passion Johann Mouton is an automation engineer at Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL) – a subsidiary of the Ohlthaver & List (O&L) Group Mariselle Stofberg

    Thinking outside the box, being creative, yet practical, and using logistics to turn an idea into reality, are some of the key aspects of being an automation engineer, which are all traits that Johann Mouton excels at.

    Mouton is an automation engineer at Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL), who is dedicated and motivated. Automation is the technology by which a process or procedure is performed with minimal human assistance.

    “Within this field you need to have a sound understanding of software development and computer programming. Troubleshooting and logical thinking are key, as sometimes the easiest solution is right in front of you.

    “Of course there are a few technical skills to be learned, such as instrumentation and control-loop calibration, but really understanding the process you want to automate is key,” Mouton said.

    His interest in the field has its roots in the subjects he had in high school.

    “I attended Windhoek Technical High School and had electronics as a subject, which made me realise that I wanted to pursue a career in the field of engineering.

    “After I matriculated, I took a gap year and worked as a river guide at Felix Unite on the Orange River. From there I went to Cape Town, where I completed my diploma in electronic engineering at Cape Technikon.”

    While working as a junior automation engineer at NBL, Mouton enrolled at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (Nust) to finish his degree in electronic engineering.

    “I first learned about automation when I was still studying in Cape Town and attended a short programme called Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) during one of my holidays. When I first started working it was in a completely different field, which included CCTV and access control.”

    After three years in Cape Town, Mouton moved to Namibia with the aim of working in a technical field and was employed at Namibia Diaries, a subsidiary of the O&L Group, in logistics.

    Shortly thereafter he applied for a position at NBL, where he was responsible for projects and document administration.

    “This is when I became more acquainted with the automation world and instantly knew that this is what I wanted to do. The junior automation engineering position became available, for which I was the successful candidate, and only then my journey into the automation world started.

    “Since then, automation time and time again, gave me a real eye-opener of what opportunities exist in this field,” he added.

    Within the field of automation, it is essential that one stays up-to-date with all the latest developments and available training.

    “A big part of the training involves on-the-job training, as the automation environment changes and improves daily. I also attended a few additional courses, including in programming at the Siemens head office in South Africa,” Mouton said.

    “I try and stay up-to-date with the newest technology articles, trends and latest developments, and also regularly attend automation fairs. The one thing I realised is that you never know enough, and by constantly keeping up-to-date, this has a significant advantage in my line of work.”

    Mouton describes the biggest challenge he faced in this field as the struggle to find relevant training and study opportunities.

    “In Namibia and South Africa there aren’t dedicated fields of study for automation and you are left with registering for online courses, which can be quite expensive. You also can’t register at the Engineering Council of Namibia as an automation engineer, because it is not a recognised field of engineering yet, but in South Africa it is changing, and will probably change here as well.”

    Mouton added that with all the advances in the automation field and also the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which is about big data and smart sensors, the future of automation is exciting.

    With the challenges faced and the shortcomings identified, Mouton is planning to get more involved with the Namibia Training Authority (NTA) to explore the possibly of assisting in creating dedicated instrumentation and automation fields of study.

    He is also a member of the Society for Automation, Instrumentation, Measurement and Control (SAIMC), which is trying to do the same in South Africa.

    “I’ve realised that with automation rapidly advancing and changing work environments, it is of so much more importance that students are given opportunities to advance in automation.”

    He aspires to one day climb Kilimanjaro and continue his development and growth within this exciting and continuously changing field.

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    Without effort, nothing prospersWithout effort, nothing prospersFrom humble beginnings to oil and gas specialist Siyeleka Lomba dos Santos works with various Namcor stakeholders, such as the board, exco and management, and is keen to learn something valuable every day. Michelline Nawatises



    Siyeleka Lomba dos Santos was born and raised in the dusty streets of Okandjengeti in Oshakati.

    She remembers being a carefree, caring and hardworking child.

    What comes to mind when she reminisces about those days is that children were raised by villagers with love, care and protection.

    Some of the social evils like gender-based violence and child abuse were not prevalent during her childhood.

    She grew up in a humble home with hardworking parents, who with the little they had were able to provide for their seven children. She is the second-born. Her upbringing and the humble demeanour of her parents taught her valuable lessons about life, and those lessons are the anchors that have steered Dos Santos throughout her career and life.

    Her dreams and vision are what kept her committed to becoming a better version of herself, as she excelled at school and along her distance-learning journey to becoming a lawyer through the University of South Africa (Unisa).

    She passed her justice training, with merit, on the first try. She is currently on the roll to be admitted as a legal practitioner of the High Court of Namibia in October 2019.

    Being hardworking was a visible character trait since childhood. During school holidays she used to beg her parents to assist her with finding holiday jobs, so she could assist them with paying for school fees and to buy school uniforms.

    “That dream materialised when I turned 16, when I found part-time employment at a local clothing shop. When I got paid, I immediately handed over my salary to my mom and told her that she now does not have to worry about our school fees and uniforms,” she says.

    Dos Santos attended International Primary School and Mweshipandeka High School, and in 1999 she enrolled at the University of East London for an information and communications technology (ICT) diploma. When she returned to Namibia, Norman Tjombe, who was then a lawyer at the Legal Assistance Centre (LAC), recommended that she applies for a temporary project assistant position at the centre, an opportunity she gladly grabbed.

    She worked hard and proved her capabilities.

    At the end of a three-month contract she was offered permanent employment as a project assistant in the juvenile justice department at the LAC, under the supervision of a woman she highly respects, Celeste Zaahl.

    During the years that followed she was promoted to personal assistant to the director.

    “My legal career began with their teachings, mentoring, support, inspiration and motivation to strive for greatness, I was driven to succeed and to achieve my lifelong goal to go to university,” Dos Santos said.

    With the assistance of the LAC, she enrolled for a bachelor of laws at Unisa and completed her degree in 2015.

    Dos Santos’ career ended at the LAC in 2014, after 15 years of service.

    He then joined Namcor in April 2014 as the governance support officer in the corporate governance department.

    Dos Santos recently rose to the position of legal manager.

    She is responsible for overseeing Namcor’s legal functions, including providing legal advice and services and negotiating legal and commercial matters and contracts.

    She says it is a privilege to work with very experienced, skilled and respected people like managing director Immanuel Mulunga, whose leadership is excellent and very commendable, as well as Damoline Muruko (executive: corporate governance), who transfers her skills and motivates her to reach her full potential.

    Johannes Gawaxab, a previous Namcor board chairperson, motivated her by saying she has great capabilities and potential, “so if you remain stagnant you have no one else to blame but yourself”.

    No day is the same in her current job.

    “I could easily walk in and commence with contract negotiation meetings with the commercial teams or be locked up in my office reviewing a contract or preparing legal opinions,” Dos Santos said.

    With her mother losing her sight last year and her father being diagnosed with throat cancer, it was a devastating year for Dos Santos and her family, but she is inspired by the fact that despite everything, her parents remain united in love and are always positive about life.

    “This reinforces my mantra that despite the challenges we face in life we should always be grateful to God for everything we have and for just waking up each morning,” she says.

    She is in awe of the opportunities granted to her since she joined the oil and gas sector.

    She enrolled at the University of Aberdeen Scotland for an LLM in oil and gas law, as there is a shortage of lawyers in Namibia with this skillset. Her next mission is to learn how to swim. What she fears is time going by too fast.

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  • 09/26/19--15:00: The full package
  • The full package The full package Chrysander finds his niche at King Price He is a family man, rugby guru and a firm believer that clients are king. Evany van Wyk

    Born and raised in Walvis Bay, former national rugby star Chrysander Botha now calls Windhoek home.

    It’s also where he is actively working towards making sure King Price Insurance takes over the insurance industry in Namibia.

    In his position as a claims validator, he is responsible for checking information disclosed by clients in terms of their claims, in order to make sure it is true and complete.

    After high school, Botha did a two-year short course in financial management at Boland Collage in Stellenbosch, South Africa. Later, he enrolled and completed a three-year diploma in transportation and logistics at the University of Johannesburg.

    With nothing less than a huge smile on his face, Botha shares with Careers that he married his childhood sweetheart.

    “We are also blessed with two beautiful sons and of course a family dog,” said Botha.

    Botha is also working on obtaining his level 3 certificate in rugby coaching.

    “One of my biggest accomplishments was to represent my country at the age of 20,” said Botha, who played for the Welwitschias from 2008 to 2019.

    Ten successful years later, he has celebrated playing 50 games for the country, while breaking the national try-scoring record. His glory days on the field might be over, but Botha says he will continue to be involved in the sport he loves.

    Botha has shown he has a clear vision for and absolute dedication towards his job. His mission is to be the best at what he does, but at the same time also offer a service to clients that will put a smile on their faces.

    “With King Price, the client is king,” he said. Not only does he work hard, he believes in working smart.

    “I always try to implement new ideas in the way I work and this has worked out quite well so far,” Botha said.

    A surprising fact Botha shared is that he initially wanted to become a navy seal. He feels they have the best jobs in the world. Admittedly his current job is completely different from what he wanted to become, but he believes that destiny definitely played a part.

    “In 2018, I came in for an interview, was hired that same day, and boom, now I’m part of the King Price family,” explained Botha.

    His advice is for people to live to learn, because information is vital in the corporate world.

    “Go out there, meet people, talk to them and find out what they do and how they do it, because the more you know, the better. You can never know too much,” Botha advised.

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  • 09/26/19--15:00: A life of service
  • A life of serviceA life of serviceDeputy Commissioner Gaweses is an example to all police officers Helen Charmaine Gaweses, who has celebrated 26 years of service in the Namibian police, is a vibrant, brave, loving and focused woman, and always strives to achieve her goals and objectives Michelline Nawatises



    Helen Charmaine Gaweses is the head of the project division under the policy, planning and development directorate in the Namibian police.

    Deputy Commissioner Gaweses (maiden surname Tsaes) joined the force as a young lady at the age of 21 and started her training 26 years ago at the Luiperds valley training college.

    After the completion of her training, she was stationed at the Otjiwarongo police station and a few months later her dedication and commitment was acknowledged, and she was transferred to the criminal investigation unit as an investigator.

    She underwent a basic criminal investigation course and thereafter an advanced investigations course and was appointed as a detective. As time went by, Gaweses worked in various offices.

    She is a dedicated wife and the mother of four children.

    Despite her responsibilities as a mother and wife, she is a committed career woman, not only as a police officer.

    She has dedicated herself to her studies and achieved various qualifications, including a national diploma in police science, a bachelor of technology in human resources, a bachelor of business administration in project management and an honours degree in business administration, majoring in project management. She is currently busy with a master’s degree in project management.

    Project engagements

    In 2010 Gaweses kick-started the facilitation of the development of the police’s strategic management plan for human resources.

    From 2011, Gaweses was involved in the development, coordination, implementation and monitoring of the e-policing system.

    She and her team trained police officers countrywide in e-policing and how to use the Nampol Automated Biometric Identification System (N-ABIS).

    E-policing is defined as the utilisation of technological devices, in order to record, store, analyse and share policing information.

    In other words, e-policing entails the automation of the manual processes of capturing, storing and analysing policing data.

    Because e-policing initiatives involve creating national databases for case docket management, crime statistics, crime intelligence, geo-policing and motor vehicle clearing certificates, among others, it contributes significantly to the reduction of crime in Namibia.

    Gaweses was also involved in the coordination of the Road Safety Integrated Management System (RSIMS) with the National Road Safety Council, which deals with accident reports. This sees accidents reported manually at police stations being automated.

    “The system was implemented last year in the Khomas Region only and will be rolled out to the other regions in due course,” Gaweses said.

    She further embarked on a benchmarking trip in terms of the e-policing system to Beijing, China and also went to the United States of America for a feasibility study on plea-bargaining in the criminal justice system.

    In 2014, she coordinated the traffic management and CCTV system.

    She was appointed as the team member spearheading the National Crime Combatting Strategy Project, which will still be implemented in due course.

    Gaweses plays a crucial role in the development of most electronic systems in the police force.

    She was also appointed as the project manager of N-ABIS and was part of its development and implementation.

    This system analyses fingerprints for criminal records and was integrated with an e-docket system for speedy results in terms of criminal cases. This included the analysing and printing of police conduct certificates for work permits and driver’s licences, etc.

    Her dedication and commitment resulted in her achieving milestones that did not go unrecognised.

    She has received a certificate of appointment as a detective, a recognition medal for 20 years of service and a bravery medal.

    Gaweses is a role model to many and she mentors many successful officers. She is a hardworking and an exemplary senior officer. She is humble and always leads by example. She is a vibrant, brave, loving and focused woman, and always strives to achieve her goals and objectives.

    Gaweses enjoys sewing and spending time with her family in her free time.

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    The changing face of the maritime industryThe changing face of the maritime industry Oshoveli Kashume



    My name is Oshoveli Kashume. I am currently employed by Erongo Marine Enterprises and I serve on the Desert Ruby fishing vessel as third mate or third navigation officer.

    Erongo Marine Enterprises is based in Walvis Bay and is one of the leading horse mackerel fishing companies in Namibia. The company operates two Namibian-flagged, midwater trawlers, the Desert Ruby and Desert Jewel. I am really proud to be among the few females in the country to work on such a large vessel.

    After completing my schooling, I enrolled at the University of Namibia (Unam) and studied towards a bachelor of science, majoring in mathematics and science. However, due to financial constraints, I had to leave after the first year.

    I was among 500 applicants who responded to an advertisement by Erongo Marine Enterprises for trainee positions.

    After undergoing several tests, I was one of the eight successful candidates.

    Erongo Marine's main purpose for this cadetship programme was to transfer expertise from foreign to local crew members.

    As a cadet, I served my sea-time working in all departments of the fishing vessel.

    This ranged from working in the onboard factory, working on the deck with the bosun and at times also in the galley.

    After acquiring enough sea-time, I was enrolled at Project Maritime Training in Saldanha Bay where I obtained my navigation watchkeepers’ ticket for fishing vessels. I was then promoted to fourth navigation officer and seven years later to third navigation officer.

    As a female working in a male-dominated industry, "this isn't a place for women" was a common saying.

    Thanks to Erongo Marine's commitment to promote a diverse and inclusive workforce, I have managed to overcome all the challenges that came my way.

    I enjoy working at sea and would like to encourage other females willing to enter the maritime industry to always believe in themselves and all that they are.

    Know that times are changing. The world is recognising our role as women in the maritime industry.

    Testimony to this is this year’s theme for World Maritime Day, celebrated yesterday, which is ‘Empowering Women in the Maritime Community’.

    This puts the spotlight on the importance of gender equality and the contribution of women within the maritime sector.

    There's nothing I've encountered that a woman cannot do. This type of life takes a lot of commitment and determination, but nothing is impossible if you set yourself clear goals and commit yourself to achieving them. Always be eager and willing to learn and never give up; even though the going gets tough.

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: Battle of the brawlers
  • Battle of the brawlersBattle of the brawlers'Executioner' faces undefeated Islam Heavy-handed Namibian pugilist Walter 'The Executioner' Kautondokwa will take on unbeaten and world-rated Kanat Islam in his opponent's backyard in Kastana, Kazakhstan tomorrow. Walter 'The Executioner' Kautondokwa will clash with Kanat Islam, who currently holds the WBO middleweight international title, tomorrow, and the fight could go either way.

    Kautondokwa, with 18 fights, one loss and 17 knockouts, lost a WBO world title fight against American boxer Demetrius Andrade in October last year.

    Andrade had originally been scheduled to face Billy Joe Saunders, but the latter failed doping tests.

    The Namibian had less than two weeks to fully prepare, and despite losing, he surprised the boxing world with his toughness. He went the distance against the more experienced Andrade in their 12-round fight.

    He rose from the canvas four times on the night, showing what a tough cookie he is.

    The Namibian, who joined the professional boxing fray in 2013, then regrouped and in May this year defeated Zimbabwe's Simeon Tcheta.

    The fight moved him up the WBO rankings, where he currently occupies 10th position.

    His promoter Nestor Tobias and trainer Smoking Joe from the MTC Nestor Sunshine Tobias Boxing Academy are with him in Kazakhstan.

    “We are looking forward to this fight because a win will attract even bigger fights in this competitive weight division. We have come here to win and this title will come back home,” Tobias said confidently.

    Islam, who is the reigning WBO international champion, has a record of 26 fights with an impressive 21 knockouts. He is rated number eight in the world, which makes the encounter even more prestigious. He last fought Julio De Jesus in July whom he dispatched in spectacular fashion via an opening round stoppage. He is now dubbed the next Gennady 'GGG' Golovkin, who is also from Kazakhstan, because of his aggressive style and massive punching power.

    The winner of the Kautondokwa-Islam contest could easily find themselves among the top four in the world, which opens the doors to a world title fight against Andrade.

    LIMBA MUPETAMI

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    Rundu offers interest reprieveRundu offers interest reprieve The cash-strapped Rundu town council has embarked an incentive programme that will see residents and businesses apply to have their interest on municipal accounts in arrears waived.

    Rundu mayor Isak Kandingu said the programme will run from 1 November to 30 June 2020.

    Kandingu said outstanding balances attract interest of 1.67% per month and this undoubtedly puts additional pressure on residents.

    “The Rundu town council has been observing that the outstanding debt of its residents is growing exponentially every year, due to the prevailing economic hardships being experienced.

    “It is against that background that the council at its meeting held on 16 October deemed it appropriate to give an interest charge incentive to its residents to pay their outstanding debts,” Kandingu explained.

    This announcement comes just weeks after council threatened to suspend the water supply of residents with overdue water bills.

    Rundu ratepayers owe the local authority over N$200 million.

    Kandingu explained the incentive programme will only cater for defaulters who are willing to settle the full amount, be it once-off or in instalments. This should be done during the allocated timeframe.

    “The capital charges will be expected to be paid in full during the eight months, effective from 1 November 2019 to 30 June 2020, and it will be upon full settlement of the capital charges that interest amounts shall be reversed from the accounts,” Kandingu said.

    He said the incentive programme applies to both individual and corporate accounts, including sundry accounts. He added the incentive programme is applicable to all types of municipal services and accounts, irrespective of the outstanding balances or the period involved.

    He explained that interest paid prior to the effective date of the incentive programme shall not be waived or refunded. Kandingu urged all residents with outstanding debts to apply and avoid accumulating more debt, as this will result in the disconnection of essential services.

    “All individuals and corporates with outstanding debts on their accounts may participate in the incentive programme, provided they apply on approved application forms available at council offices and submit such forms to council,” Kandingu said.

    The council is faced with a number of challenges because of a lack of funds.

    KENYA KAMBOWE

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: One RDP, two lists
  • One RDP, two listsOne RDP, two listsLegal advice sought to deal with internal crisis Infighting has thrown the RDP completely into disarray on the eve of the November elections. A faction that reconvened the Rally for Democracy and Progress (RDP) national convention on 11 to 13 October in Otjiwarongo says it will challenge the Electoral Commission of Namibia (ECN) in court for accepting a list of candidates from another group on 11 October.

    Asser Sheuyange, who was elected as secretary-general at the meeting in Otjiwarongo, said the ECN has “committed a serious mistake by accepting a fraudulent list for National Assembly and the name of the presidential candidate, in the name of the RDP”.

    Sheuyange was speaking outside the RDP head office after being stopped from conducting a media conference on the premises on Tuesday.

    He said the “legitimate list” of candidates has wrongly been “rejected”.

    “[The] party is left with no other option but to pursue this matter in a competent court of law,” Sheuyange said, adding that the ECN should withdraw the “fraudulent candidates and accept the legitimate candidates” submitted by RDP director of elections John Nghishekwa.

    Mike Kavekotora, who was elected as the RDP's presidential candidate at the party's disputed electoral college at Rundu earlier this month, wrote to the ECN that Nghishekwa had resigned as the party's director of elections and was replaced by Brunhilde Cornelius.

    Not so, says Sheuyange, who added: “Of course this is completely inaccurate and false.”

    Sheuyange said the party is not splitting into two, despite it having different election candidate lists.

    “We have one constitution; we are one party,” he insisted.



    Otjiwarongo elections

    Sheuyange said the Otjiwarongo meeting nullified decisions of the convention held in June for a number of reasons.

    The Otjiwarongo meeting found that the election of Kavekotora and Cornelius, respectively as president and secretary-general, did not adhere to the RDP constitution. Equally, it found that both Kavekotora and Kennedy Shekupakela (for the position of vice-president) did not get 50+1% of the votes as required.

    The Otjiwarongo convention elected a list of 53 candidates for the upcoming national elections, which includes Kandy Nehova as presidential candidate, Tjinezuma Kavari (vice-president), Phyllicia Hercules (national chairperson), Iyaloo Werner (deputy chairperson), Sheuyange (secretary-general), and Desmond ?Nauseb (deputy SG).



    'Illegal'

    Sheuyange said all meetings held subsequent to the national convention in June are illegal, because none were sanctioned by a central committee (CC), which at the time was non-existent.

    The reconvened meeting, among others, decided to open an RDP election campaign bank account with FNB Namibia, and has applied for the replacement of signatories to the party's Bank Windhoek current account.

    It has also sought legal advice to assist resolving the political crisis in the party.

    CATHERINE SASMAN

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: In love with God
  • In love with GodIn love with GodMaranatha is on the rise Her latest single No Other Love is a foretaste of what to expect on Maranatha's upcoming album titled Intimate Love, which features an impressive list of international artists. Award-winning gospel vocalist Maranatha Goroh, popularly known as Maranatha, has spoken about the thrilling journey towards her new album, the Maranatha Music Ministries (M3) brand, her new singles and album release party.

    Following her debut album titled Smile, which was released in 2016, Maranatha has been hard at work on new projects, including a new album, rebranding her image under M3, as well as performing abroad.

    Maranatha said she is trying to penetrate the global musical market with her new music, which features different international acts.

    Her latest, titled No Other Love, features Naomi Classik, one of Nigeria's top vocal coaches.

    The single was released last week on some local radio stations, as well as on social media platforms.

    According to Maranatha, the single which was put together by different producers such as Mr Glo and Dj K Boz, does not talk about the love of boyfriends and girlfriends, but the love of God.

    “On this single, I am singing about my self-testimony, and expressing love for God,” Maranatha said, adding that God's love is unconditional.

    The single is a foretaste of what to expect on Maranatha's upcoming album titled Intimate Love.

    The single also followed her two inspirational tracks titled A Million Bright Torches and All We Need, featuring former South African Idols winner Heinz Winckler and gospel singer Ntokozo Mbambo.

    Speaking about her upcoming 15-track album, Maranatha says the whole album is about her personal love with God.

    She teamed up with acclaimed international gospel stars Mbambo, Shaun P, Winkler, Patrick Duncan, Classik and Freddie Vessels to give the album a different taste.

    Asked why it took her two years to complete the whole album, she says it is because of different producers and artists from different countries that worked tirelessly on the project.

    “I also have to fly outside the country to look for suitable artists to feature on my album, and different producers,” Maranatha said.

    Her direction with the album was to go global, and penetrate into the international market.

    “The album also aims to touch many people's lives and change their mindsets, especially those that are not Christians, to start believing in God,” she explained.

    Maranatha added that all her new projects were done under her new brand M3, which comprises of 14 members, including videographers, graphic designers, photographers and seven singers.

    Maranatha also announced her album release party next Friday, 1 November at Protea Fürstenhof, which she says is going to be one of a kind.

    During the release party there will be a live band performance by M3, as well Nam Gospel United artists. There will also be video clips of Maranatha's musical journey, performances, a listening session, mingling and interactions with the audience.

    Tickets will be sold in advance at Antonio's Art for N$200. The package includes an album, welcoming drinks and a meal.

    STAFF REPORTER

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: Bringing the extraordinary
  • Bringing the extraordinaryBringing the extraordinaryAthawise to launch EA2.0 tomorrow Athawise's debut album Elite Asylum, released in 2017, spawned numerous hits and he is finally ready to release his new offering called Elite Asylum 2.0 (EA2.0) tomorrow. Athawise describes EA2.0 as an extended play (EP) record that sounds like an album.

    He added that the music still sounds out of this world, stressing that it is nothing like you have heard before.

    “I got to work with different producers on this project, unlike the previous one,” he said.

    He mentioned that he spent the last two years trying to put together his 2020 album titled Sensei, but felt like 2020 was too far and his fans needed music from him.

    Most of his fans discovered Athawise through him being featured on tracks.

    “So they went to look me up and see what I am about. Numbers keep going up, meaning we never disappoint.

    “EA2.0 is just a little taste of what is to come. On this EP, I believe I will achieve what I have I have always wanted for a long time, and that is making all my fans proud at the same time,” said Athawise.

    He initially wanted to have 10 songs on the EP but disclosed he was advised to just keep it to between three and seven songs, since it's an EP.

    On the sound direction, the BlvcBoxx Entertainment signee said every genre has a beat that makes his soul bleed, while sharing that “extraordinary” is his permanent sound direction.

    “If you remember my last project, you would know that my sound is pretty rare. You will never guess where the inspiration comes from,” he said.

    Dubbed the collaboration king, Athawise values working with other artists and treats songs he is featured on as though they are his own. He said he applies the same dedication, ethics and respect he would on his own songs. “I am a professional and art comes naturally. Whether the song becomes a hit or not, be certain that on my part it was worked on just as hard,” he said.

    Athawise will host this EP drop party tomorrow at Chicago's in Windhoek. Places to purchase the EA2.0 will be announced via his social media platforms no later than this Monday.

    MICHAEL KAYUNDE

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: An escape from city life
  • An escape from city lifeAn escape from city life If you just want to relax and take a break from city life in a big swimming pool, Gross Barmen resort is the place for you.

    The peaceful resort is located just 25 kilometres from Okahandja, so one doesn't have to spend too much time on the road.

    Those who have frequented the establishment call it “holy water”. The thermal pool is open at night for those who prefer a late night swim.

    The minerals found in the water are said not only to be good for arthritic conditions and pain, but are apparently also good for the skin. The closing time depends solely on the manager's discretion.

    The resort is on top of its game when it comes to its accommodation facilities, offering style and comfort away from home. The interior design is classy, yet simple. Visitors have the option to reside at the resort's family, premier and bush chalets, all offered at different costs. DSTV is available as you relax in your accommodation, especially if you don't want to miss weekend football or rugby.

    The food at the restaurant was well-prepared.

    The general idea of just being away from the noise of city life is welcome. There are also braai facilities available. This is the place to consider, as we are approaching the festive season. It is the ideal time to take some time off as friends or family to relax.

    The service could have been better at the restaurant. Some staff are trying their best, but others certainly need to learn a thing or two about hospitality and treating each visitor with warmth, whether they are on a complimentary visit or not. I give Gross Barmen three stars. It's worth a visit.

    LIMBA MUPETAMI

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: A new journey begins
  • A new journey beginsA new journey beginsTrackers: An incredible M-Net production The MultiChoice team has delivered another spectacular production. Hosted by Nico Panagio, the premiere of Trackers took place last week at Monte Casino in Johannesburg.

    Trackers is a much-hyped six-part series that will start airing this Sunday, 27 October, at 20:00 on DStv's M-Net (channel 101).

    The series is based on Afrikaans author Deon Meyer's crime novel of the same name.

    “We are celebrating something special. I did not expect anything less from the sensation that is Deon Meyer,” said Panagio at the launch event. This is the second time Meyer's work has been adapted for mainstream television.

    Meyer described Trackers as a South African homegrown production, saying he has had other works adapted, but this one is better.

    “It is one of the most complex novels, so I had challenges,” Meyer admitted.

    Trackers highlights organised crime in Cape Town, which entails the smuggling of diamonds and rhinos from neighbouring countries.

    The star-studded cast includes Rolanda Marais, James Gracie, Thapelo Mokoena, Sandi Schultz, Brendon Daniels, Sisanda Henna, Trix Vivier and Jill Middlekop.

    Sandi Schultz's character name is Janina, the director of the presidential bureau of intelligence. Janina works closely with Mokoena's character called Quin Makebe.

    Another interesting character you should look forward to in this series is Julius Shabangu, also known as Inkunzi. This character is brought to life by Henna. Inkunzi is the go-to crime boss in Cape Town, who makes things happen and lives a lavish lifestyle.

    Overall, if the first episode is anything to go by, Trackers is an excellent production and we can't wait to see how the story unfolds in the remaining episodes.

    It is commendable for M-Net that they once again looked for an excellent concept and brilliant writing, while casting some of the best within the movie industry.

    Some of the high-profile media personalities who graced the red carpet at the launch included Anele Mdoda, Claire Mawisa and Tumi Morake.

    MICHAEL KAYUNDE

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: Onwards and upwards
  • Onwards and upwardsOnwards and upwards Let's just get this out of the way: The music industry in Namibia is fruitful for many artists right now and might remain that way for the foreseeable future.

    You may disagree with me about the industry being fruitful, and that is okay. You are entitled to your own opinion. Most of the content I write about in my column is inspired by conversations I have with musicians and industry peers.

    Today I just want to share means and ways on how I believe musicians can keep their careers thriving.

    If you are established or just getting started, there are a few essential truths when it comes to keeping your music career alive.

    Firstly, it is important to allow yourself to grow and evolve as a musician.

    Many artists who enjoy long careers reinvent themselves often. Just look at Sally Boss Madam, Exit, Gazza and PDK; the music they make now is very different from what they used to create when they started.

    Although they have their set of classic songs, they understand that creating new music is important to keeping fans interested. Maybe even more importantly, exploring new musical ideas and genres will help you maintain your passion for music.

    Secondly, because our music scene is relatively small, artists are forced to get day jobs, which is okay. My advice if you want a full-time job is to get one that helps build your network.

    I must stress that there is nothing wrong with taking a day job, but make a conscious decision to find work that will make it easier for you to still have time for the studio, other artistic commitments and networking.

    In Namibia, word of mouth can help you find out about gigs that never get publicly advertised, and personal connections can help you land gigs that you otherwise wouldn't be considered for.

    You may call it corruption, but who you know in this industry, to a certain extent, determines the amount of times you get booked. That is just the sad truth.

    Still on the subject of performance, this year we have had some of the best music concerts, and it is commendable that our musicians are working together to make this happen.

    However it is disappointing that many artists perform the same songs at every show. For instance, if Gazza and KP Illest are in the line-up, just know Penduka and Okay Okay are going to be performed. That's just an example. Maybe it's because my job requires me to be at so many shows, but I honestly know the sets of so many artists, and it's not encouraging.

    michael@namibiansun.com; @MichaelMKAY on Twitter

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: Beautiful, bold Behati
  • Beautiful, bold BehatiBeautiful, bold BehatiNamibia's finest causes Instagram frenzy From saving our precious rhinos, to motherhood, to being one of the world's top supermodels, Namibian-born Behati Prinsloo has the world at her feet. Namibian-born supermodel Behati Prinsloo remains a role model for many across the world, not least of all for Namibians.

    From being an ambassador for Save the Rhino Trust (SRT) Namibia to raise awareness about rhino conservation and to stop poaching, to her rock-solid marriage to Maroon 5 frontman Adam Levine, who married the Victoria's Secret model in 2014, to being a supermom to Dusty Rose and Gio Grace, Behati is an amazing women.

    She recently sent Instagram into a frenzy when she posted a bikini shot , which was an instant hit with her 5.8 million followers, with one fan remarking she is a “goddess”.

    She also recently appeared on a massive Times Square billboard in New York, along with the SRT Namibia logo.

    Earlier this year, Behati revealed she was introduced to her husband by a mutual friend. Levine was looking for a girl to cast in a music video.

    Although Behati passed on the job, she and Levine met for the first time in person a month later, when he ended up taking her out for dinner. The connection was immediate, as they ended up talking for hours. “It was love at first sight, it was crazy,” she told Porter magazine.

    She joined forces earlier this year with SRT Namibia to raise awareness about rhino conservation.

    Today there are less than 5 000 black rhinos left in the wild. This endangered species is regularly targeted by poachers. If rhino poaching continues at the current tempo, this iconic animal will be wiped out in the next 10 years. SRT Namibia protects the last of these animals in the wild in the northwest of Namibia.





    As part of her alliance with SRT, Prinsloo has launched a global campaign and travelled to Namibia in May.

    She hit the ground alongside trackers from SRT and Rhino Rangers from the Conservancy Rhino Ranger Incentive Programme.

    She tracked rhinos on foot across rugged terrain, absorbing the effects of wildlife crime, compounded by the drought, and gained a deeper understanding of the commitment needed to protect these critically endangered animals.

    This was her first trip to Namibia in seven years and it provided an opportunity for Behati to chronicle this transformative journey in an effort to share the story of these incredible creatures and the amazing community of Namibians fighting for their survival.

    She said at the time: “Namibia is my home. It's the secret jewel of Mother Africa. It's also one of the most amazing places in the world, and the rhinos contribute to this sense of wonder.

    “I grew up there and it is where my parents still live so this cause is very close to my heart.

    “The opportunity to come home to see what is happening, to meet people caring for orphaned black and white rhinos, and to work with the trackers, rangers and communities to raise awareness is very important to me.”

    Behati added: “Someday, I want to take my children to experience these animals in the wild. They've inspired us for generations; it's on us to help them now.”



    Sporty spice

    Behati's Instagram uploads are few and far between, but when she does hop on the social media platform, her posts certainly do not disappoint.

    Recently she shared a new photo to her Instagram page that was an instant hit with her 5.8 million followers.

    In the shot, the 31-year-old was captured in the middle of a beach volleyball game, and the moment looked somewhat intense.

    Behati cradled the white and pink volleyball in one hand as she held up the number two in the other, possibly indicating how many points she needed to come out victorious.

    Of course, the Victoria's Secret Angel looked absolutely stunning in the shot.

    Fans of the Namibian bombshell went absolutely wild for the new addition to her Instagram feed. The upload racked up over 191 000 likes within its first 24 hours since going live to the social media platform, as well as hundreds of comments with compliments on her jaw-dropping display. “Behati is my goddess,” one person wrote, while another said that the model had the “perfect body”.

    -Additional reporting by Inquisitr

    STAFF REPORTER

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: RDP: From bulldog to puppy
  • RDP: From bulldog to puppyRDP: From bulldog to puppyFrom triumphalism to political purgatory When former Swapo cadres coalesced around the late Hidipo Hamutenya to form the RDP in 2007, they could never have predicted the political purgatory that would follow. The Rally for Democracy and Progress (RDP) is a case study of a once promising party whose formation was heralded as the beginning of the end of Swapo – a nemesis from whose womb the new party crawled as a promising infant.

    If the political turf was the biblical Garden of Eden, Swapo would be Adam from whose rib the RDP, the proverbial Eve, emerged.

    Swapo, freshly freed from the grip of its no-nonsense founding president Sam Nujoma, was being dragged into the doldrums.

    The ruling party, now led by Hifikepunye Pohamba at the time, was shaken. Unlike liberals who deserted the party at the turn of the century to form the Congress of Democrats (CoD), the RDP was an exodus of revered freedom fighters who deserted their political home because their idol, Hidipo Hamutenya, was being mistreated in a party he had served with unquestionable commitment.

    Hamutenya was no Ben Ulenga, whose political pinnacle was securing a diplomatic posting to the UK. Hamutenya was Nujoma's blue-eyed boy, who switched cabinet posts enviously.

    In the build-up to the landmark Swapo extraordinary congress of 2004, convened with the sole purpose of finding a replacement for Nujoma who was letting go of the state presidency, Hamutenya threw his name into the hat.

    His defeat at the hands of Pohamba, preceded by his sacking from cabinet by Nujoma a few days before the congress, left a sour taste in the mouth of his army of supporters.

    It was these events that midwifed the conception of RDP three years later, in 2007.

    The party formally announced its existence by participating in the 2009 general election, with commentators as sure as the dawn that the party would break Swapo's two-thirds majority.

    In unprecedented fashion, Swapo ruthlessly trounced RDP and Hamutenya. Out of the 72 seats in the National Assembly, Swapo took 54 for itself. With eight seats, RDP didn't make double digits. Taking 75% of the presidential vote, Pohamba taught Hamutenya - his friend in person and his groomsman when he wedded his wife Penexupifo – an indelible lesson as the latter only salvaged 10%.

    As thoroughly beaten as it was, RDP became the official opposition – a status it enjoyed for only five years before DTA, now christened PDM, eclipsed it.

    With the party only retaining three seats in the National Assembly in 2014, the rank and file started firing unsavoury salvos at Hamutenya. Underground work to remove him as president also swelled, but the Lincoln University political science alumnus smelled danger and threw in the towel voluntarily.

    The prodigal son that is Hamutenya returned to Swapo in August 2015 with his family, to ululations of former friends and foes.

    Hamutenya's departure opened up a Pandora's Box of highly charged leadership contention in the party – and the wounds of that battle are more evident now than they ever were.

    With this series of events, coupled with the emergence of internal strife, the whirlwind that was the RDP started calming down.



    'Cold outside Swapo'

    It was, after all, Hamutenya who famously coined the phrase “it is cold outside Swapo” when Ulenga left the party to form CoD in 1999.

    Twelve years after pomp and fanfare characterised RDP's formation, a sorry tale of self-implosion succinctly sums up the RDP of today.

    Under the leadership of Mike Kavekotora as president, the party is rocked by factionalism which threatens its performance in next month's election.

    Kavekotora faces internal rebellion from particularly the supporters of his new nemesis Kandindima Nehova, whose political lust is as insatiable as Kavekotora's own.

    Nehova's backers – including the party's youth league - do not recognise the election of Kavekotora as president in June this year, nor do they accept results of the electoral college held in Rundu this month, where Kavekotora was again endorsed as the man to take on Swapo's Hage Geingob and the entire gang seeking residence at No. 1 Engelberg Street, Auasblick.

    Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) executive director Graham Hopwood said this week that essentially, the RDP was a vehicle for Hidipo Hamutenya's leadership ambitions.

    “With his return to Swapo and subsequent passing, the raison d'être for the RDP has largely disappeared.

    “The party doesn't appear to have been able to reinvent itself and is riven with internal disputes. They might still get into parliament, but with only one or two seats,” Hopwood said.

    In July, the RDP devised a strategy to reclaim its glory days as a political force. It is composed of key points which the party has identified as its weaknesses, where it needs to improve and what to rebuild or get rid of among others, Nampa reported.

    Political commentator Rakkel Andreas says Swapo has retained its strongholds, and the weakness of the RDP is that most of its members are former ruling party members.

    “This resulted in low morale, leading to the infighting we have all been witnessing.

    “The party was formed as an alternative to Swapo; it never clearly crafted its own ideology and identity, so it was always perceived as a political faction.

    “To 'save' the party, for lack of better word, will require that it invests in communicating its ideology very well and setting itself apart as an opposition party with clear ideals and a better vision, compared to the other parties,” Andreas says.



    Reactionary

    She says the disappointing fact about Namibian political parties is that they tend to be reactionary towards Swapo.

    “You will pick it up in their language, it is not often 'we will do this', instead it tends to be 'Swapo did not do this and so we will do this'.

    “When you speak like that, your first acknowledgement is Swapo and after that no one listens anymore, because it sounds like you are just complaining.

    “A word of advice is that they start with what they stand for, and as a matter of conversation, point out where the current ruling party has fallen short,” Andreas adds.

    TOIVO NDJEBELA AND ASHLEY SMITH

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: Venaani complains to SADC
  • Venaani complains to SADC Venaani complains to SADC AU, Commonwealth also to be approached The official opposition will approach regional and international groupings about Namibia’s insistence on using ‘unreliable’ voting machines. CATHERINE SASMAN



    Popular Democratic Movement (PDM) leader McHenry Venaani says he will be seeking a meeting with the SADC chairperson, Tanzanian president John Magufuli, to talk about the use of electronic voting machines (EVMs) without a voter-verifiable paper audit trail (VVPAT) in Namibia’s upcoming general election.

    Venaani said yesterday that EVMs used without a VVPAT cannot be trusted and that ballot papers should rather be used.

    He said Zimbabwean president Emmerson Mnangagwa, who is the chairperson of the SADC organ on politics, defence and security cooperation, would also be in copied in the letter to Magufuli.

    “We do not expect much of [Mnangagwa] given the fact that his democratic credentials are eroded in Zimbabwe, but we will nonetheless send him a copy of the letter as the chairperson of the SADC organ,” Venaani said.

    He said he would similarly engage the SADC election observer mission, as well as the observer missions of the African Union (AU) and the Commonwealth on the matter.

    Speaking at a media briefing yesterday, Venaani said the Electoral Commission of Namibia (ECN) had initially promised that the EVMs would have a VVPAT, which never materialised.

    This, he said, was while the EVMs continued to lose credibility in India, where they were manufactured.

    They have also been rejected by at least 10 first-world countries, including the United States, Sweden, Germany and Italy.

    “We were willing to use the EVMs with a paper trail,” he said, while castigating the ECN for seeking money from central government for administrative purposes, instead of introducing the VVPAT.

    Venaani made it clear that the PDM was not withdrawing from participating in the elections, but said the party would “pressurise” the ECN to “go back to the ballot [paper]”.

    “The EVMs have no credibility and here the EVMs are even stolen. If nations around the world are rejecting the EVMs, why should we trust them? The answers the ECN provided about the lost EVMs tell one that it is not in control,” Venaani said.

    He called on PDM members and the public “to remain calm” while he engaged regional bodies.

    Venaani said PDM was demanding that its party agents and representatives be allowed into the final collation or the verification centre at the ECN head office in Windhoek, where said election results were “cooked”.

    Venaani claimed that only Swapo members like Erkki Nghimtina and Andrew Ndishishi, plus members of the country’s intelligence agency, were allowed in the verification centre after the 2014 elections, while other parties were kept out.

    ECN head Theo Mujoro earlier this week said that party agents would be allowed inside the collation centre.

    Venaani, however, insisted the ECN had promised to issue letters to parties that would allow party representatives inside the verification centre, but this had not happened.

    “The ECN says we must trust them, but we do not trust them,” Venaani said.

    Posters not allowed

    The PDM also complained that Cenored would not allow it to put up its election posters on power poles at Swakopmund, Khorixas and Otjiwarongo before Swapo had put up its posters.

    Venaani said the Swakopmund municipality indicated it did not want posters on its poles, presumably because the poles get damaged.

    The City of Windhoek demanded payment of N$200 000 before allowing posters, and the Rehoboth town council would only allow 100 posters in seven streets, the PDM said.

    “Cenored or whoever will not stop us from operating in a democratic country,” Venaani said.

    “Cenored and all municipalities are hampering the democratic process. We ask that they please allow the democratic process to run smoothly.”

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    Free cancer screening at Nkurenkuru todayFree cancer screening at Nkurenkuru today KENYA KAMBOWE



    The Ongwediva Medipark Private Hospital, in conjunction with the office of the former first lady Penexupifo Pohamba, will today conduct free cancer screening at Nkurenkuru in the Kavango West Region.

    The event will take place at the Nkurenkuru health centre.

    According to Ongwediva Medipark’s managing director, Dr Tshali Ithete, the aim of the free breast, cervical and prostate cancer screening is to detect and prevent these serious illnesses.

    Ithete said the programme also aims at creating awareness about cancer in general

    “This initiative will ensure that members of the community, especially rural communities receive the necessary knowledge to combat further unnecessary morbidity and mortality from preventable cancers as early detection is key in cancer prevention,” Ithete said.

    Today’s event will be followed by a cancer walk tomorrow after the official programme that will be held at the Nkurenkuru community hall.

    Ithete revealed that more than 3 000 women and men have taken part in the annual free screening programme held in the Oshana, Ohangwena, Omusati, Oshikoto and Kunene regions.

    Ithete therefore called on the residents of Kavango West to take part in the free screening campaign.

    Kavango West regional governor Sirkka Ausiku also called on people to show up in numbers and make use of the opportunity.

    “Firstly, I would like to thank our former first lady, Madam Penexupifo Pohamba, for hosting this event through Medipark Private Hospital. We appreciate the initiative to bring health services closer to our people.

    “We know cervical cancer is a concern and is always diagnosed when it’s too late. Early diagnosis is important and I am urging all residents of Kavango West to come in their numbers to be tested, including those from neighbouring regions closer to Nkurenkuru, they are also welcome,” Ausiku said.

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    Erindi sale still a sore point Erindi sale still a sore point JEMIMA BEUKES



    Local ancestral land activists are still protesting the sale of Erindi Private Game Reserve despite the Namibia Competition Commission (NCC) giving a Mexican billionaire the green light to purchase the luxury estate.

    NCC spokesperson Dina Gowases yesterday confirmed that the main condition they had imposed was that the new owner, Alberto Baillères, may not retrench workers for five years.

    The sale was approved despite resolutions passed by the second land conference in October last year that no land would be sold to foreigners.

    Servaas van den Bosch, who is a director of Emergo, the company providing public relations services to Baillères, told Namibian Sun that Baillères wanted to respect the regulatory process and would only comment once it was completed.

    Meanwhile, the Namibian Ancestral Land Foundation insists the sale of Erindi would cut off the country’s largest private game reserve from the rest of Namibia, making it a “country within a country”.

    Sandie Tjaronda, the foundation’s spokesperson, said Erindi was “too huge a piece of land” to be sold to a single person who is a foreigner.

    “This is a continuous promotion of the absentee landlord regime because this Mexican will come here once a year or so. We cannot afford to apportion our land to people who will not support our economy. We will see illicit cash transfers and this money will not be hugely invested in our economy except for a few salaries that will be paid. The rest of the money will be taken out of the country,” said Tjaronda.

    He added that the Namibian government had a moral obligation to ensure that Namibians have unhindered access to the gravesites of their ancestors at Erindi.

    “Now people must with sore and bleeding hearts look on as their ancestral land is taken away by foreigners,” said Tjaronda.

    jemima@namibiansun.com

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  • 10/24/19--15:00: One-of-a-kind operators
  • One-of-a-kind operators One-of-a-kind operators Paving the way Priscilla Damases is currently the only Namibian woman trained to operate a ship-to-shore crane. LEANDREA LOUW



    The Namibian Ports Authority (Namport) recently added another milestone to its company profile after 33 employees were trained to operate ship-to-shore (STS) cranes.

    Four STS cranes were acquired at N$440 million to enhance efficiency at the new container terminal built on reclaimed land. With these cranes, vessels calling at the port now have a faster turnaround time.

    Another remarkable milestone is that only one woman graduated as a STS crane operator, making her the first in the country.

    Priscilla Damases (31) started out as a forklift driver at Namport in 2014, and was encouraged by her peers to apply to be part of the STS crane operator training.

    “I just wanted to show the ladies that anything is possible if you put your mind to it. Never underestimate yourself as a woman. I am really proud of myself,” she says.

    Not only was the only woman, she also graduated top of her class.

    “Opportunities for women to operate machines such as these rarely happen, but as soon as it comes you need to grab it with both hands. Let me serve as an encouragement to other women that they can also do it.”

    She started her journey at Namport in 2014, when she applied to be trained as a forklift driver.

    Damases was born in Windhoek and completed her schooling at Otjiwarongo. “After school I came back to Windhoek, and while I was there I received the call from Namport. Before that I was doing odd jobs, working in shops. I can honestly say it was truly through God’s will that all this made possible.”

    Her next target is to be trained as tugboat pilot. “This will only happen through hard work and determination.”

    “As a woman there is nothing standing in your way of reaching your goals. Nothing can stop you; you can get anything you want in life but you need to fight for it and make sure it happens,” she says.

    At the graduation ceremony, chief executive officer Kavin Harry said Namport had invested over N$9 million in the training.

    “This included the rental of the simulator used during training before the trainees were exposed to the training on the actual cranes. This was a worthwhile investment that has started bearing returns within two months of commissioning.

    “With these improved and efficient productivity levels at the port, this has resulted in shorter turnaround times of vessels calling at the port. We are beginning to receive positive feedback on our improved efficiencies and turnaround times from our port users, in particular the shipping lines.

    “While it is definitely too early to celebrate these positive developments, the feedback is very encouraging and we hope to sustain and build on this momentum.”

    Harry said with the help of the STS cranes, Namport has achieved 26 recorded moves per hour so far.

    “We envisage increasing from 26 to 30 moves per hour in the not too distant future.”

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