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Tells it All - Namibian Sun

older | 1 | .... | 1073 | 1074 | (Page 1075) | 1076 | 1077 | .... | 1152 | newer

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    High Court upholds bail refusal in murder caseHigh Court upholds bail refusal in murder case A Namibian soldier accused of killing his ex-girlfriend with a gunshot to the head in January 2018, will remain behind bars pending his trial after his appeal to overturn a magistrate's decision to refuse him bail was dismissed this week.

    High Court Judge Petrus Unengu on Tuesday in his judgment stressed the seriousness of the crime Johannes Neuaka (40) stands accused of, saying “this court will be naïve not to take into account that cases of gender-based violence are serious in nature and are prevalent in Namibia.”

    Neuaka faces a charge of murder read with the provisions of the Domestic Violence Act and was denied bail by Magistrate Agatha Brigitte Okamaru in October last year.

    Namibian Sun in June reported Neuaka had filed 11 grounds of appeal in a notice filed at the High Court in March this year.

    Unengu on Tuesday added that the public has a “significant interest that persons accused of committing such crimes stand their trial and do not abscond. In this regard, the public interest is a weighty consideration.”

    The judge concluded there were no grounds to interfere with the ruling of Magistrate Okamaru and dismissed Neuaka's appeal.

    Unengu also dismissed an argument that when Neuaka was granted bail during a previous criminal case he was embroiled in, in which he was accused of car theft, he stood trial and did not abscond.

    The judge said a murder charge is “particularly more serious compared to that of theft”.



    Life lost

    Neuaka allegedly shot Shane Rittmann (25) in Damara location, Katutura on 21 January 2018 with a 9mm Makarov pistol. Their young son and her mother were reportedly nearby when Rittmann was shot.

    Relatives testified last year that Rittmann and Neuaka's five-year relationship had ended shortly before the alleged murder and that the relationship had allegedly been marked by frequent acts of domestic violence.



    Serious

    In October Magistrate Okamaru based her refusal to grant bail on her conclusion that Neuaka's version of events to which he testified, was characterised by contradictions which had rendered his version less believable than the version of the state.

    Neuaka pleaded not guilty to the murder charge, claiming the shooting had been accidental.

    The magistrate said Neuaka failed to satisfy the court that he should be released on bail and said it would not be in the best interests of the administration of justice to release him on bail.

    In his judgment, Unengu this week said that “the nature of the crime alleged to have been committed and the strength of the state's case are extremely relevant at the stage when bail is considered.”

    He added that Neuaka faces a charge “which in no doubt, if found guilty, would attract a considerable heavy imprisonment sentence.”

    The judge said it is the court of appeal's duty to take into account factors such as the seriousness of the offence faced by an appellant which could result in heavy prison sentences. “That fact would indeed tempt the appellant to abscond,” he said. “In my view, that onus was not discharged.”

    Neuaka was represented by lawyer Mbanga Siyomunji, while advocate Erick Moyo appeared for the State.

    JANA-MARI SMITH

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    Zim architects gun for MutorwaZim architects gun for Mutorwa The Office of the Labour Commissioner has ruled it has the jurisdiction to hear a matter in which 11 Zimbabwean architects claim their services were unfairly terminated by the Namibian government.

    They have filed an application against works minister John Mutorwa, requesting the payment of their severance pay.

    This matter follows a previous High Court order that stated the architects must vacate their positions at the ministry after it was found that a memorandum of understanding (MoU) signed between Namibia and Zimbabwe had expired.

    The notice of arbitration award states that the matter was postponed from 4 December 2018 to 14 February this year.

    It also pointed out that at conciliation the ministry questioned the jurisdiction of the labour commissioner's office, claiming it does not have the jurisdiction to hear matters challenging the validity of an order of the High Court. Government also argued that the architects were notified of the termination of their contracts on 30 April 2018, and were given three months' notice, which was in line with their contracts.

    However, the architects submitted that the labour commissioner had to decide on their dismissals and not the High Court order.

    According to the notice of award, the architects said government dismally failed and neglected to present their employment contracts before the High Court and only made reference to the MoU.

    The architects also argued that the High Court made the order while under the impression that they were employed in terms of the MoU, when in fact they had individual employment contracts with different terms.

    Mutorwa said yesterday they will comment after the verdict.

    JEMIMA BEUKES

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    Ondonga faction abandons Oluno officesOndonga faction abandons Oluno offices A faction that took over the Ondonga Traditional Authority offices at Oluno in April 2017 has now left, after an unsuccessful court challenge to stop the coronation of the new king Fillemon Shuumbwa Nangolo.

    Nangolo was coronated last weekend. Namibian Sun was informed that last Friday, after Judge Thomas Masuku struck the matter from the roll, the Ondonga grouping led by Nepando Amupanda left the offices at Oluno and never returned.

    The court application was lodged by Nangolo's uncle Konisa Eino Kalenga, who had also been vying for the throne.

    The Amupanda grouping claimed they were the new Ondonga councillors appointed by the late Omukwaniilwa Immanuel Kauluma Elifas, who died in March.

    The group included Jerry Kambala (Amuteya district), Paavo Amwele (Ondangwa B district), Erastus Mvula (Ondangwa A district), Nepando Amupanda (Ongula yaNetanga district), Ester Gwashamba Nepando (Uukwanambwa), Frans Shidhudhu and Reinhold Nepolo (Oniiwe district).

    They also formed part of the grouping that supported Kalenga.

    When contacted yesterday, Amupanda said those at the traditional authority's Onethindi offices must comment.

    “I hope you were at Onambango for the new king's coronation and now you come to me asking about the Oluno offices. Why don't you go and ask those at Onethindi?” asked Amupanda, before hanging up.

    Before the Amupanda group took over the Oluno offices, they organised a peaceful demonstration by Uukwanambwa community members and marched from Onamungudo to the Oniipa constituency offices, where they handed a petition to Oshikoto governor Henock Kankoshi, demanding the removal of senior Ondonga leaders.

    Later that same year it was reported that the late King Elifas fired Vilho Kamanya (Amuteya district), John Walenga (Ondangwa district), Peter Kauluma (Ongula yaNetanga district), Joseph Asino (Oniiwe district) and Kashona kaMalulu, as well as Tonata Ngulu and Fillemon Nambili, for alleged gross misconduct. Kamanya, who is the acting traditional authority chairperson, said they do not understand Amupanda's actions.

    “Where are the ones who put him in those offices and for what purpose he was there? Therefore, we cannot be held liable for him. He must just answer the questions without dragging in other people,” said Kamanya.

    “All I can say is that was a public office for the Ondonga community and they will be held liable for whatever happened in that office during their time.”

    ILENI NANDJATO

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    Geingob must intervene - TucnaGeingob must intervene - TucnaUnion calls on president to stop City water tariff hikes Tucna has called President Hage Geingob to issue an executive order that will halt the City of Windhoek water tariff increases. The Trade Union Congress of Namibia (Tucna) has called on President Hage Geingob to put a stop to the 5% water tariff hikes for Windhoek residents, while also urging government to speed up the removal of visa requirements for all Africans visiting the country.

    “The president must issue an executive order in terms of which the water tariffs increment for the City of Windhoek is declared contrary to the public good in this time of acute need and economic challenges, and for them to be revoked forthwith,” Tucna secretary-general Mahongora Kavihuha said at a media conference yesterday.

    Kavihuha accused the municipality of leaning on a “lame justification” for the hikes, which are related to a 5% NamWater bulk water supply increase.

    The City council in June approved the proposed 5% increase, pending the gazetting of the tariff increases approved by the municipality.

    “The argument that the increments are done to recover direct and indirect costs associated with the provision of water and other relevant services simply does not hold water,” Kavihuha said.

    “Why during this difficult year? Why not wait until the drought eases off?”

    Kavihuha also criticised the lack of consultation with stakeholders, including residents, before the increases were agreed and approved.

    He particularly took aim at NamWater.

    He said NamWater, as a bulk supplier, has done little “for all the time of their existence” and accused them of “sneaking” the increases through.

    Kavihuha also noted that the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) has taken centre stage, but little has been done to prepare the groundwork for such a deal.

    He referred to the lack of ratification of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) key standards on labour migration and said Namibia has fallen behind in terms of prioritising migration and migrant worker issues.

    “Looking at the instruments that would fast-track regional integration, whose core is the free movement of people, in Namibia these are all shelved and again no discernable movement or progress can be registered.”

    Kavihuha added agreement will be signed “without fully engaging those that could be affected by the free trade agreement, such as workers for instance”.

    The union, he said, is going to “tackle the ratification” of the two conventions dealing with migration in the Labour Advisory Council and are hopeful that the labour ministry will fast-track the process through cabinet to parliament “without further delays”.

    Kavihuha added that while the union was happy when it was announced that visas for Africans will be scrapped, little has happened since that pronouncement.

    He urged Geingob to “consider favourably the removal of visa requirements for all Africans, or if done for the reasons of revenue collection, for visas to be issued on arrival”.

    He also criticised the performance of the home affairs ministry, claiming that conditions have deteriorated and that passports now take lengthy periods to be completed.

    JANA-MARI SMITH

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    ECN geared up for voter registrationECN geared up for voter registration The Electoral Commission of Namibia (ECN) is ready to kick off its supplementary voter registration period for the upcoming presidential and National Assembly elections that will take place in November.

    The commission also announced yesterday that for the first time in its history it had not recruited civil servants and would be making use of unemployed youth.

    ECN chairperson Notemba Tjipueja, announced that the 2019 supplementary registration of voters will kick off on 8 July.

    She also said the total number of registered voters currently stood at 1.2 million, with Khomas leading with 230 193 voters, followed by Omusati with 133 593 and Ohangwena with 130 725.

    The least number of registered voters are in Omaheke (41 370).

    The ECN statistics also show that generally women are the most keen to register to vote in the four O-regions, as well as in Kavango and Zambezi, while in Erongo, Hardap, //Karas and Omaheke men seem to be more inclined to vote.

    Tjipueja said the commission requires 856 vehicles for registration purposes and has so far managed to secure 712 government vehicles.

    “We have always looked at private individuals to assist, to hire out their vehicles at rates that we feel are reasonable. These rates are contractually entered into with the owners of the vehicles. It is really not a question of anyone scoring, but a mutual rate agreed between the ECN and the owners of the vehicles,” she said.

    Mujoro added the ECN pays N$1 200 for the use of a 4x4 and N$1 000 for a 2x4 vehicle per day, while the owner covers the fuel for these vehicles.

    Meanwhile, the ECN has secured five trucks and two helicopters to access inaccessible areas in the Kunene Region, where road infrastructure is almost non-existent.

    In addition, Tjipeuja added that the Zambezi regional council has supplied towboats to be used in flood-prone areas.

    Tjipueja said 15 days from 9 September have been earmarked for political parties to table their objections to the inclusion of names on the provisional voters' register at electoral tribunals.

    “The electoral tribunals are expected to deliver their verdicts on objections lodged… during the period 9-24 September and only then can the final voters' registries be determined and finalised,” she said.

    “The ECN is urging all eligible Namibians who do not already have a voter's card to go in droves to the registration points to register themselves,” she said.

    JEMIMA BEUKES

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    The shame of stalled projectsThe shame of stalled projects Five Namibian child victims were also reunited with their parents and two Zambian nationals were repatriated.

    In comparison to 2017, a total of 21 victims were also identified and five were referred to a shelter. Seven victims were Namibian and 14 foreign nationals from Zambia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC and Angola. Thirteen victims were exploited for forced labour, including domestic servitude and cattle herding, while seven were sex trafficking victims. One victim was exploited for both sex trafficking and forced labour.

    According to the report over the past five years human traffickers have exploited domestic and foreign victims in Namibia, while traffickers also exploited victims from Namibia abroad.

    It said some victims are initially offered legitimate work for adequate wages, but are then subjected to forced labour in urban centres and on commercial farms.

    Namibian children are subjected to forced labour in agriculture, cattle herding and domestic service, and to sex trafficking in Windhoek and Walvis Bay.

    “Among Namibia's ethnic groups, San and Zemba children are particularly vulnerable to forced labour on farms or in homes. “Children from less affluent neighbouring countries may be subjected to sex trafficking and forced labour, including in street vending in Windhoek and other cities, as well as in the fishing sector. Angolan children may be brought to Namibia for forced labour in cattle herding.”

    Furthermore, the report notes that the government conducted multidisciplinary training for 35 criminal justice practitioners on identifying potential victims, referring them to protective services and legal support, as well as on prevention efforts and raising awareness of the crime.

    A further 35 social workers and shelter service providers were trained on the provision of victim-centred protective services, while 140 immigration officials were provided with anti-trafficking training. In partnership with an international organisation, government finalised a national referral mechanism (NRM) and standard operating procedures (SOPs) to guide frontline officials in the identification of victims and the provision of protective services.

    It also finalised and disseminated the National Gender-Based Violence (GBV) Plan of Action, which included a comprehensive framework to address trafficking.

    The labour ministry employed 77 labour and occupational health and safety inspectors, who were responsible for enforcing laws against child labour.

    The government also increased anti-trafficking law-enforcement efforts. POCA criminalised sex trafficking and labour trafficking and prescribed penalties of up to 50 years' imprisonment or a fine not exceeding N$1 million.

    The report said these penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with punishments prescribed for other serious crimes, such as rape. “However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government did not finalise implementing regulations for the Combating of Trafficking in Persons Bill, which are required for the law to be operational. It also did not adequately fund facilities equipped to shelter victims of trafficking.” It did not have a policy to encourage participation of trafficking victims in investigations. The law provides for witness protection or other accommodations for vulnerable witnesses, which, in principle, should be available for trafficking victims.

    However, 14 victims voluntarily assisted law-enforcement during the reporting period. According to the report government requested information and offered repatriation assistance in a case involving five Namibian child trafficking victims exploited in the United Kingdom. While government had no formal policy to provide residence permits to foreign victims of trafficking, during previous reporting periods, officials made ad hoc arrangements for victims to remain in Namibia. The report recommends that Namibia increases funding to civil society partners that provide accommodation and care to trafficking victims, to ensure they have adequate resources, and also increase efforts to investigate and prosecute traffickers.

    “The government did not make efforts to reduce the demand for commercial sex acts or forced labour.”





    ELLANIE SMIT

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    LPM bashes town hall meetingsLPM bashes town hall meetingsSays they are election ploy The LPM has accused President Hage Geingob of using town hall meetings as a Swapo election campaign cover-up. The Landless People's Movement (LPM) has accused President Hage Geingob of using town hall meetings and regional missions as a guise to promote Swapo with government machinery.

    LPM deputy leader and chief strategist Henny Seibeb yesterday said there are plenty of platforms the president can use to give feedback to the people. “These are none other than Swapo campaign meetings. There is too much fighting in Swapo and no trust, so now therefore it is better to use state machinery to garner influence. At all their public gatherings, the attendance of people declined, which shows that people are dissatisfied with the ruling government,” he said.

    Geingob held town hall meetings in 2015 shortly after his election as president.

    “What is he going to tell them this time around? Unemployment is higher than it was before. The land question was critical at the town hall meetings. Can he tell us confidently that it has been addressed? Announcing that he has appointed a commission on ancestral land is not an achievement,” said Seibeb. “Will he tell the people that the student unemployment rate is so bad that 60 000 Namibian graduates cannot find jobs? Is he going to tell people that fishing factories are closing down and people are losing their jobs every day? Or is he going to tell them that he is going to open new factories to create employment?”The LPM also asked why the president cannot make use of his direct representatives - the regional governors - and appointed regional staff to convey his message to the people. “This is typical African politics, where you do state business in the day and promote the party at night, all on the state budget,” he said. Meanwhile, presidential press secretary Alfredo Hengari this week insisted that the president's meetings and missions to regions have no political manoeuvre. According to Hengari, the president has a two sets of duties, one as head of state and another as Swapo president, and critics must differentiate amongst the two.

    “Right now, it's the time for the president to go back to the regions, as he usually does, and speak to Namibians and hear what has been done so far, what has been implemented in terms of drought relief and hear from them first-hand, instead of just relying on reports coming from offices,” said Hengari. According to the presidency, Geingob is going to tour the regions in order to identify bottlenecks, and if there are any, provide direct solutions.







    JEMIMA BEUKES

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    Sex, human traffickers exposedSex, human traffickers exposedNamibia lauded in new global report Over the past five years human traffickers have exploited domestic and foreign victims in Namibia, while traffickers also exploited Namibians abroad. Namibia has performed substantially better in terms of prosecuting and convicting human traffickers, as well as identifying victims, according to a global report.

    Despite achieving the same ranking in the 2019 US State Department's Trafficking in Persons Report, which was released this week, the country was lauded for making significant efforts to eliminate human trafficking.

    However, Namibia has once again been placed on the Tier 2 List, which means it does not fully comply with the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) minimum standards, but is making significant efforts to bring itself into compliance with those standards.

    According to the report efforts made by Namibia include more investigations and prosecutions of potential traffickers and convicting traffickers for the first time in two years. A total of nine trafficking cases involving 18 suspects were investigated in Namibia last year, compared to seven cases in 2017.

    Of the nine cases investigated three involved alleged sex trafficking, four alleged forced labour and two investigations that were still ongoing at the close of the reporting period.

    Prosecutions were also initiated in seven cases involving five defendants, in comparison to the four cases prosecuted last year.

    All the defendants were charged under the Prevention of Organised Crime Act (POCA) of 2004.

    Meanwhile, two defendants were convicted, compared to zero convictions in 2017.

    Among those convicted last year, one accused was sentenced to eight years' imprisonment, while the other was not yet sentenced at the close of the reporting period.

    The report says the Namibian government also increased its efforts to protect trafficking victims. A total of 21 trafficking victims were identified, including five women, 10 girls, and six boys, of which 14 victims were referred to an NGO shelter, which was partially government-funded.





    Five Namibian child victims were also reunited with their parents and two Zambian nationals were repatriated.

    In comparison to 2017, a total of 21 victims were also identified and five were referred to a shelter. Seven victims were Namibian and 14 foreign nationals from Zambia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC and Angola. Thirteen victims were exploited for forced labour, including domestic servitude and cattle herding, while seven were sex trafficking victims. One victim was exploited for both sex trafficking and forced labour.

    According to the report over the past five years human traffickers have exploited domestic and foreign victims in Namibia, while traffickers also exploited victims from Namibia abroad.

    It said some victims are initially offered legitimate work for adequate wages, but are then subjected to forced labour in urban centres and on commercial farms.

    Namibian children are subjected to forced labour in agriculture, cattle herding and domestic service, and to sex trafficking in Windhoek and Walvis Bay.

    “Among Namibia's ethnic groups, San and Zemba children are particularly vulnerable to forced labour on farms or in homes.

    “Children from less affluent neighbouring countries may be subjected to sex trafficking and forced labour, including in street vending in Windhoek and other cities, as well as in the fishing sector. Angolan children may be brought to Namibia for forced labour in cattle herding.”

    Furthermore, the report notes that the government conducted multidisciplinary training for 35 criminal justice practitioners on identifying potential victims, referring them to protective services and legal support, as well as on prevention efforts and raising awareness of the crime.

    A further 35 social workers and shelter service providers were trained on the provision of victim-centred protective services, while 140 immigration officials were provided with anti-trafficking training.

    In partnership with an international organisation, government finalised a national referral mechanism (NRM) and standard operating procedures (SOPs) to guide frontline officials in the identification of victims and the provision of protective services.

    It also finalised and disseminated the National Gender-Based Violence (GBV) Plan of Action, which included a comprehensive framework to address trafficking.

    The labour ministry employed 77 labour and occupational health and safety inspectors, who were responsible for enforcing laws against child labour.

    The government also increased anti-trafficking law-enforcement efforts. POCA criminalised sex trafficking and labour trafficking and prescribed penalties of up to 50 years' imprisonment or a fine not exceeding N$1 million.

    The report said these penalties were sufficiently stringent and, with respect to sex trafficking, commensurate with punishments prescribed for other serious crimes, such as rape.

    “However, the government did not meet the minimum standards in several key areas. The government did not finalise implementing regulations for the Combating of Trafficking in Persons Bill, which are required for the law to be operational. It also did not adequately fund facilities equipped to shelter victims of trafficking.”

    It has did not have a policy to encourage participation of trafficking victims in investigations.

    The law provides for witness protection or other accommodations for vulnerable witnesses, which, in principle, should be available for trafficking victims.

    However, 14 victims voluntarily assisted law-enforcement during the reporting period.

    According to the report government requested information and offered repatriation assistance in a case involving five Namibian child trafficking victims exploited in the United Kingdom. While government had no formal policy to provide residence permits to foreign victims of trafficking, during previous reporting periods, officials made ad hoc arrangements for victims to remain in Namibia.

    The report recommends that Namibia increases funding to civil society partners that provide accommodation and care to trafficking victims, to ensure they have adequate resources, and also increase efforts to investigate and prosecute traffickers.

    “The government did not make efforts to reduce the demand for commercial sex acts or forced labour.”





    ELLANIE SMIT

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  • 07/04/19--16:00: New RCC salaries twist
  • New RCC salaries twistNew RCC salaries twist The works ministry will no longer be responsible for the salaries of Roads Contractor Company (RCC) employees after making a final payment at the end of June.

    This is according to ministry spokesperson Julius Ngweda, who said the responsibility for the RCC has now fully been transferred to the Cabinet Committee on Treasury.

    “We did our part on the RCC and it is now in the hands of the treasury committee. Last month was the last time for us to pay the salaries of the employees of the RCC,” he said.

    The responsibility would now fall into the hands of the ministry of finance, he added.

    “The cabinet committee and the ministry of finance must now figure out how to pay the RCC employees.”

    It will not be the first time the fate of the RCC will be left in the hands of the cabinet committee.

    Public enterprises minister Leon Jooste referred the matter back to the works ministry, when quizzed on the future of the RCC, in the light of its obligations towards creditors and employees.

    “Please request the information from the ministry of transport, as the RCC is still reporting to that ministry in this regard,” he said.

    Following a decision to place the beleaguered parastatal under judicial management, the cabinet committee was tasked to decide the fate of the RCC in 2017 already.

    The RCC board and its line ministry, the ministry of works, said a second rescue plan was being finalised in September last year. At the time, board chairman Obren Sibeya told Namibian Sun: “The RCC is at an advanced stage of finalising its rescue plan, which will first be discussed by the full board, the shareholder and thereafter communicated to all other stakeholders.”

    The first rescue plan was a proposed cash injection of N$580 million from Chinese construction firm Jiangsu Nantong Sanjian. Repayment would have taken place in the form of participation by the Chinese company in current and other identified future projects for “five years or earlier”.





    The 47% stake that would have gone to the Chinese firm in these projects was worth an estimated N$2 billion. Government pulled the plug on that deal in May last year. The parastatal's money woes come a long way.

    By September 2017, cabinet resolved to place the company under judicial management, but the bill is yet to be tabled in parliament. Had it been passed, the RCC would have been granted a stay in legal proceedings by its creditors.



    OGONE TLHAGE

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  • 07/04/19--16:00: Roux jets in for Huang case
  • Roux jets in for Huang caseRoux jets in for Huang case Laurentius Julius, one of Jack Huang's co-accused in a N$3.5 billion tax fraud case, has appointed prominent South African advocate Barry Roux to lead his defence.

    The case continues in the Magistrate's Court today.

    Julius is the owner of a Walvis Bay-based logistics company at the centre of the massive customs fraud case.

    Roux comes with immense experience, having defended Paralympian Oscar Pistorius, who was subsequently convicted of murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine's Day in 2014. During Pistorius' trial it was reported that Roux's appearance came at a cost of R32 000 a day.

    Impeccable sources confirmed that Roux landed in Windhoek yesterday afternoon.

    Julius' defence team now consists of Dirk Conradie as his attorney, advocate Werner Boesak and Roux.

    In a telephonic interview, Conradie confirmed Roux's recruitment.

    “I can confirm that Barry Roux will lead the legal team,” Conradie said.

    Julius (41), Huang and six other Chinese nationals have been charged in connection with allegations that they manipulated import documentation used to ship N$3.5 billion out of Namibia.

    This was allegedly done through the bank accounts of two companies owned by Julius from 2013 to 2016.

    It is also alleged that the accused under-declared the value of goods imported into Namibia to customs authorities to evade the payment of duties.

    Julius was arrested at Walvis Bay in December 2016, and was granted bail of N$1.5 million after he had been in custody for more than a month.

    Roux earlier this year led the legal team of Malawian Shepherd Bushiri.

    Bushiri and his wife were arrested in Rustenburg on charges of fraud and money-laundering.



    Sonja Smith

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    Young sport stars take to the fieldYoung sport stars take to the fieldClassic Clashes continue Yet another weekend of epic matches provided learners with fantastic opportunities to showcase their talent. Mariselle Stofberg &

    Michelline Nawatises



    The FNB Classic Clashes created yet another opportunity for young and upcoming sports stars to showcase their talent this weekend.

    The powerhouse soccer teams of St George's Diocesan School and St Paul's College took to the field in an epic match on Friday at the Sam Nujoma Stadium in Windhoek, where the former won 2-1.

    The school, which is celebrating its centenary this year, brought their band, energy, and determination to make their school proud. The first half had the learners of the respective schools on the edge of their seats. St George's led the game 2-0 after the first half thanks to goals by Fillipo Micheletti and Ndapama Humutengela. During the second half, the St Paul's team regrouped and came back with new fire, with midfielder Javee Mujoro scoring the only goal in the second half.

    St George's right-wing Zander McLune was awarded the man of the match after his great performance during the game.



    Netball and rugby

    In other Classic Clashes news, sportsmanship reigned supreme at the Delta Secondary School (DSSW) grounds on Saturday, as netball and rugby teams battled it out.

    The DSSW's u-15 rugby team was victorious over Windhoek Technical High School, winning 22-12.

    The school's coach, Victor Izaaks, said that the challenge his boys faced was that their opponents were much bigger in terms of size.

    “The team had to go in with all heart and aggression which made them more tired than expected,” he said. However, the team made it through to the quarterfinals, which Izaaks says is a milestone achievement. “I'm proud of the boys as we didn't have a chance to reach this stage for a long time.”

    HTS captain Precious Hummel said that there is room for improvement. “There was a lack of communication, we need to speak to each other effectively,” he said.

    Jan Möhr's u-19 netball team won against DSSW with a score of 25-9. Captain Vejaa Katunohange said that the team took some tips from their opponents. “We learned from Delta that even though you are on the losing side, not to give up as they fought until the end and had great teamwork,” she said.

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     Education minister guilty of corruption Education minister guilty of corruption Education minister Katrina Hanse-Himarwa has been found guilty of corruptly using her former position as Hardap governor for gratification. Judge Christie Liebenberg delivered his judgment to a packed courtroom a while ago. The corruption trial related to Mass Housing beneficiaries being removed from a list to the benefit of the minister’s relatives.




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    MoUs must be scrutinised - MatheusMoUs must be scrutinised - Matheus Newly reappointed Namibia Sports Commission (NSC) chairperson Joel Matheus says there is a need to study memorandums of understanding (MoUs) that Namibia has with sister countries, so they can benefit local sport.

    Speaking to Nampa on Saturday, he added that if everything goes according to plan, the MoUs will assists in developing sport in various ways, to the benefit of Namibians.

    “We are busy exploring MoUs with various countries to see where we can incorporate sport, so that we create a platform where sport development can take its course,” said Matheus.

    Namibia has signed various MoUs with different countries, including Ghana, with whom six agreements have been signed so far.

    These include deals for sport and youth development under the Namibia-Ghana Joint Permanent Commission of Cooperation.

    Matheus pointed out that other factors such as research and funding as some of the areas that can determine the future of sport in Namibia, when it comes to proper planning and development.

    He emphasised the lack of data that could be used to back-up planning.

    Matheus said if data is available, it could be used to drive the confidence of the private sector in terms of contributing towards sport.

    He said collective information on challenges and the interest that sport attracts, amongst others, was needed. Despite the challenges they face, Matheus said he has confidence in what the commission has achieved so far.

    “Last year we decentralised the annual national sports awards to be held in different regions, and did the categorisation of sport codes according to priority, amongst other achievements,” he said.

    He added the commission is working towards providing leadership that can motivate the sporting fraternity to work harder and be more inspired, so it can be more impactful.

    He said there is still room for improvement.

    NAMPA

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  • 07/08/19--16:00: Handsome rewards
  • Handsome rewardsHandsome rewardsWarriors still owed appearance fees for Afcon clash against Ivory Coast The Brave Warriors are still owed appearance fees for their final Afcon 2019 group match against Ivory Coast. The Fifa normalisation committee has confirmed that the Brave Warriors squad that competed at the Africa Cup of Nations (Afcon) in Egypt were paid their dues for their first and second group matches.

    The payments included qualification bonuses and call-up/camping fees, as well as appearance monies.

    Committee chairperson Hilda Basson-Namundjebo said the players received their monies for the match played against Morocco on 23 June, which Namibia lost 0-1, courtesy of an own-goal. They were also paid for their match against South Africa on 28 June, which they lost by the same scoreline.

    The outstanding appearance monies are for their third and final group match against Ivory Coast, which was played on 1 July. Namibia lost 1-4 and were bundled out of the ongoing tournament.

    “We are now busy making arrangements to courier the players' possessions from Egypt, which will be done by Friday. Then we will see if we are in a deficit or in an excess in terms of the budget,” said Basson-Namundjebo.

    She also confirmed that the team is gearing up to take part in the African Nations Championship (Chan) qualifiers, with the money coming from “elsewhere”.

    “With or without sponsorship, the team will play the Chan qualifiers. The Brave Gladiators will also take part in the upcoming Cosafa women's senior and under-20 tournaments,” Basson-Namundjebo confirmed.

    Namibia received an unconfirmed budget of N$13 million from the ministry of sport for Afcon 2019. The amount was cut from the initially proposed N$19 million, after some strange allocations were uncovered and reported on.

    From the allocations, and according to a source, it is understood that the players received close to N$180 000 each as qualification bonuses, but this amount was for those who played in all five qualifying matches.

    Individual qualification bonuses thus depended on the amount of qualification matches played. The call up/camping fees were N$82 000 if a player stayed for the duration of camp, right through to the Afcon finals, and N$73 000 each was paid in appearance fees for the three tournament matches.

    Ricardo Mannetti and his two assistants, Collin Benjamin and Ronnie Kanalelo, who has announced he will no longer be part of the technical set-up, also walked home with decent cheques for their hard work.

    The three were slated to pocket close to N$240 000 each in appearance fees and N$200 000 each for call-up/camping fees, which totals to N$440 000 each.

    LIMBA MUPETAMI

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  • 07/08/19--16:00: Windhoek Gimmies triumph
  • Windhoek Gimmies triumphWindhoek Gimmies triumphCoast vs capital encounter thrills Windhoek Gymnasium Private High School beat Walvis Bay Private High School 24-17. Elizabeth Joseph and Ester Kamati



    The Momentum rugby premier league was in full swing on Saturday as the under-19 rugby team of Namib Diesel Walvis Bay Private High School hosted Schoemans Goup Windhoek Gymnasium in another vital clash for league points.

    There was a feast of emotion as the boys put their hearts and souls into their play, but there could only be one winner.

    It was the Windhoek Gymnasium first team that triumphed by 24 points to 17. The visitors scored four tries against three to earn the bonus points on offer.

    • There was also rugby action in Swakopmund, with the earlier kick-off time despite the chilled and misty weather, the first teams of Samsung Windhoek High School and PSG Pro-Ed Academy did not shy away from showing what they are made of on the rugby field.

    WHS won an electrifying u-19 encounter 20-8. According to WHS head coach Henry Kemp the Swakopmund team really gave his boys a tough contest and could easily have ensure a win.

    “I was particularly impressed with their commitment and organisation on defence … whenever any of our players went through a gap, they really scrambled well to close us down.

    “We brought on a few replacements in the second half such as our regular captain Erik Strauss, who really made the difference for us.

    “Pro-Ed has only been beaten by Windhoek Gymnasium and WHS this season and will remain a tough proposition to any team that will still face them, because they have a chance to qualify for the Super League stage. In my view, Pro-Ed’s inside centre and fullback were particularly impressive on the day.”

    • At Outjo, the home side OK Foods Moria Private School were beaten 12-31 by the defending champions KMC/JCC Windhoek Affies.

    The winning team scored five tries without conceding any, as the Outjo Bears could only muster four penalty goals.

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    US hold back rising European tideUS hold back rising European tide The United States underlined their status as the dominant force in international women's football by winning a fourth Fifa Women's World Cup in eight editions on Sunday, but the tournament has also highlighted the growing threat coming from Europe.

    In their third consecutive final, the US were too strong for the Netherlands as they won 2-0 in Lyon to retain their title, with Megan Rapinoe and Rose Lavelle scoring.

    It means a European nation has not won since Germany in 2007, while the US team's four World Cups stand alongside their record four Olympic golds.

    Their triumph came after they topped their group ahead of Sweden and then beat Spain, hosts France and England en route to the final, where they defeated the European champions.

    While the US started their campaign with a World Cup record 13-0 win over Thailand, their encounters with European opposition were closer affairs.

    “I think the level around the world is growing exponentially every year, so four years on, this was incredibly difficult because the opponents are better and the teams we had to come through were some of the best in the world,” said US coach Jill Ellis, when asked to compare this World Cup win with 2015.

    “I don't know if it's us getting older or the game just evolving and becoming more challenging, but it has been so emotionally exhausting this time,” admitted Alex Morgan, 30, a survivor from the US team that lost the 2011 final to Japan. The US were the only nation from outside Europe to reach the quarterfinals in France.

    Ellis, who was born and brought up in England but only got a chance to play the game after moving to the US as a teenager, acknowledges that things are fundamentally changing in Europe, as leading clubs invest more heavily in women's teams.

    Real Madrid are the latest to get involved, and standards are rapidly rising in domestic leagues.

    “Right now, with the trophy going back to the States, no,” Ellis joked, when asked if she was concerned by the progress being made in Europe.

    “But with the investment the rest of the world has made, all these major clubs can see how amazing this World Cup was and how rich, in terms of fan support, it was.

    “Teams will want to continue to invest in the women's game. What does that do? It makes our job hard, but I think also we have had a commitment from our federation to grow our domestic league, because without leagues you can't exist as a national team.”

    While Germany and the Scandinavian countries remain prominent, and England and France keep aspiring to major tournament success, Spain and Italy have made huge strides, aided by the development of their own leagues.

    It has been a different story in the Netherlands; all of their starting line-up in Sunday's final are based elsewhere in Europe.

    “The competition outside is better than in the Netherlands, that's why everyone is fitter and they are playing better, and I think if we do that more, then in four years we can do this again,” Dutch defender Desiree van Lunteren said.

    For now, however, none of them have been able to stop this US generation, who are worthy successors to the great team who won the title as hosts in 1999, eight years after the country lifted the inaugural World Cup.

    “I hate comparing us to past teams. We all have our own legacy; we tried to carry on the tradition that the '91ers and '99ers left for us and I think we are doing a pretty damn good job of it,” Morgan said on Sunday.

    NAMPA/AFP

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  • 07/08/19--16:00: Scintillating performances
  • Scintillating performancesScintillating performancesNedbank Rock & Rut produces top-class racing The Nedbank Rock & Rut cross-country series, known as the XC, concluded over the weekend. Tristan de Lange took first place in the elite men's category and Marion Schonecke emerged victorious in the elite women's category of the final Nedbank Rock & Rut series event over the weekend.

    The event, which took place at the IJG trails play-pit in Kleine Kuppe, attracted many participants.

    Organisers said the event was successful and ended off the cross-country races on a high note.

    Christo Swartz took the number one spot in the sub-veteran men's category and Courtney Liebenberg emerged victorious in the sub-veteran women's category.

    The youngsters also brought their best, with Hugo Hahn claiming first place in the junior men (17-18) category, while Cindy Rowland came first in the junior women's race.

    The under-16 boys' category saw Bergran Jansen coming in first, while Monique du Plessis won the u-16 girls' category. The u-10s also impressed as Micah Chase won the boys' category, with Nicole Suren won the girls' category.

    The exciting mountain bike series included participation by boys and girls aged 10 years and younger and grandmaster men and women aged 60 and older.

    With men and women competing in the junior men and women, veteran men and women, master men and women and elite categories, the participation was very broad. The XC series is the only cross-country event in Namibia. It is unique in the sense that each series consists of short and explosive races, typically done in laps, with exciting racing taking place in each category.

    The aim of the XC series is to collect points over a series of five races, in which skills can be improved and riders can grow in the cycling community.

    The series takes place on an annual basis and is highly-anticipated.

    The XC zero races started in March this year at the IJG trails, while XC1 took place in April at the IJG trails.

    The XC2 series took place at the coast in Swakopmund.

    The XC3 event took place at Waldorf School Windhoek during June, while XC4 was concluded at the IJG trails in Windhoek at the weekend.

    Gernot de Klerk, head of marketing and communications at Nedbank Namibia, highlighted the bank's long-term commitment in support of cycling development in Namibia, which dates back more than three decades now.

    “Our support has only increased in the intervening years and cycling is now comfortably the bank's largest sponsorship property,” De Klerk said.

    Sport Reporter

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    ‘I am the Key’ ontsluit leeslus‘I am the Key’ ontsluit leeslusOntwikkel kinders se liefde vir literatuur Jongmense word deur middel van ‘n nuwe boekveldtog aangemoedig om te lees. Evany van Wyk

    I am the Key Media dien as ‘n platform vir kinders om aktief betrokke te wees by gemeenskapskwessies wat hulle raak.

    Die organisasie is in 2009 deur me. Ndahafa Hapulile onder die vaandel van die Dalarize-ontwikkelingsprojek gestig. Op 8 Maart 2013 is die televisieprogram I am the Key amptelik deur me. Micaela Marques de Sousa, ? verteenwoordiger van die Verenigde Nasies se Kinderfonds (Unicef), in Namibië bekend gestel. Die program word deur die NBC uitgesaai. Sedertdien het die program meer as 15 000 kykers gelok en het 500 Namibiese kinders al daarin verskyn. Verskeie belangrike kwessies word ondersoek en sluit onder meer gesondheid, sosiale probleme, kultuur en finansies in.

    I am the Key Media fokus hoofsaaklik op vroeë kinderontwikkeling, familiebetrokkenheid en gemeenskapsbemagtiging deur aanbevelings te maak en in te gryp waar nodig. I am the Key Media het ? ekonomiese benadering waarvolgens jong kinders as die middelpunt van ontwikkeling in die land beskou word. “Ons doel is om kinders se toegang tot ekonomiese werksgeleenthede te bevorder, want dit is noodsaaklik vir hulle ontwikkeling,” sê me. Eslien Tsuses, die projekbestuurder van I am the Key Media. Volgens haar is ? belegging in kinders een van die beste wat gemaak kan word, want dit bied kinders iets om op voort te bou.

    Tsuses het gesê I am the Key Media is trots op die spoed waarteen dit uitbrei. “Die een ding waarop ons veral trots is, is die bekendstelling van ons DVD en kinderboeke. Ons is bly om te kan sê ons het Namibië se jongste skrywer nog se werk gepubliseer.”

    I am the Key Media het in 2018 ? nuwe avontuur aangepak toe hulle die Namibië Skryfkompetisie vir Kinders bekend gestel het. Die doel hiervan is om literatuur te bevorder en om die kreatiewe potensiaal van Namibiese kinders te bevorder. “Met hierdie projek hoop ons om die liefde vir lees terug te bring onder ons jong mense,” het Hapulile gesê. Die skryfkompetisie se prysuitdeling en boekbekendstelling het in April vanjaar in Windhoek plaasgevind. Die boeke van die drie beste skrywers in die kompetisie, Cherise Vogel, Grace Nantinda en Nguvitjita Movirongo is bekend gestel.

    Met die hulp van Versatile Media is I am the Key Media besig met ‘n bewusmakingsveldtog om die kinders die nodige blootstelling te gee. Hulle het onlangs by Laerskool Herman Gmeiner besoek afgelê waar kinders aangemoedig is om te lees en skryf. Die kinderboeke is by Namibia Book Market in Windhoek by die kinderafdeling te koop.

    Die Dalarize-ontwikkelingsprojek en FNB Namibia uit die staanspoor groot ondersteuning aan I am the Key Media gebied. “Unicef was ook baie behulpsaam en het bewys dat ons enige tyd op hul knoppie kan druk,” het Tsuses gesê. Menigde bekende soos die Namibiese musikant Top Cheri, die topmodel Meriam Kaxuxena en Mej. Namibië 2018, Selma Kamanya, het hul steun aan die projek toegesê.

    I am the Key Media gaan ook vanjaar met ? vars, nuwe voorkoms spog en het nuwe vennote wat hulle bekend wil stel, het Hapulile gesê.

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    Ritme, passie en doelgerigtheidRitme, passie en doelgerigtheidPlaaslike danstalent stel nie teleur Altesaam 28 dansers van die H2E-dansskool in Windhoek het onlangs Namibiese kleure verwerf en kan die land in 2020 in Italië verteenwoordig. Mariselle Stofberg – Die H2E-dansskool in Windhoek se dansers het verlede naweek uitgeblink by die International Fine Arts Association (IFAA) se jaarlikse internasionale danskompetisie wat in Windhoek plaasgevind het. Altesaam 28 dansers van H2E het bó 85% behaal, wat hulle vir Namibiese kleure laat kwalifiseer het, en hulle in staat stel om Namibië in 2020 by die Europa Dance Awards in Italië te verteenwoordig.





    Die IFAA-kampioenskappe bestaan al 40 jaar, maar vind eers die afgelope vyf jaar in Namibië plaas.

    “H2E het in 2018 in Barcelona gaan deelneem en het ’n algehele derde plek behaal in die musiekblyspel- en hip-hop-kategorie teen lande soos Engeland, Switserland en China,” sê Este Swarts, H2E se hoof.

    Swarts berei die dansers vir vier tot ses maande lank op die IFAA-kampioenskappe voor. Dit behels dat verskillende style, soos kontemporêre dans, hip-hop, moderne dans en ballet ingeoefen word. H2E het groepe en individuele dansers vir die kompetisie ingeskryf. Die kategorieë waarin deelgeneem is, sluit dans, kreatiewe gimnastiek en show-modelwerk in.

    Die kompetisie in Italië sal van 22 tot 26 Junie vanjaar plaasvind.

    “Dansers sal op tegniek, vertoning, moeilikheidsgraad, sinkronisering van dansgroepe, choreografie, dissipline, netheid, kostumering en uniekheid van danstemas beoordeel word. Dit gaan harde werk kos om voor te berei en daarom sal ons so gou moontlik met voorbereiding wegspring,” sê Swarts

    Milla Lamprecht (13) is een van die dansers wat vir Namibiese kleure gekwalifiseer het.

    “Ek hou van dans, want dis vir my ? ontsnapping van die werklikheid. Dans is ook vir my ? ander manier om jou gevoelens uit te druk. Ek dink die kompetisie was ? goeie ervaring om net op ? verhoog te gaan en te dans. Ons het ook baie ander goeie dansers ontmoet wat ? goeie inspirasie sal wees vir ons om te verbeter in die toekoms.”

    Nog ’n danser, Andrea Hugo (13), werk reeds vandat sy begin dans het daaraan om Namibiese kleure te verwerf en kon dié droom eindelik bewaarheid. “Ek hou van dans, want dit laat my vry voel. As ek dans, voel dit of niks anders bestaan nie, want ek is in my happy place.”

    Die volgende H2E-dansers het vir Namibiese kleure gekwalifiseer: Alyna Swarts (WAP), Yana Oosthuizen (Windhoek Gimnasium), Marike Venter (Windhoek Gimnasium), Carla Celliers (Windhoek Gimnasium), Janke du Plessis (Windhoek Gimnasium), Robyn Norval (Windhoek Gimnasium), Danielle Muller (WAP), Karmi Muller (WAP), Jessné Swart (WAP), Milla Lamprecht (WAP), Andrea Hugo (WAP), Mienke Delport (Gobabis), Nia van Dyk (Windhoek Gimnasium), Annalee Waskow (WHS), Shivali Thaker (Gimmies), Chané Van der Westhuizen (WHS), Annabel Smit (Pionierspark), Ida du Toit (WAP), Chanel Vermeulen (Gimmies) Anneke Stassen, Ilne Weibach (WAP), Imani Weibach (WAP), Maya Katatenja, Jessica Salt (WHS), Helmien Fourie, Tanica de Carvelo, Zane Etsebeth (WHS) en Andrea Leff (WHS).

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    Laerskool Brandberg sit pret terug in skoolgaanLaerskool Brandberg sit pret terug in skoolgaanPlek van liefde en omgee ‘n Laerskool op Uis is vir baie leerlinge ‘n tuiste weg van die huis. Evany van Wyk

    Laerskool Brandberg is geleë in Uis, ‘n baie klein dorpie in die Erongostreek.

    Die skool is vernoem na die hoogste berg in Namibië wat sowat 12 km buite Uis geleë is.

    32 onderwysers is tans verantwoordelik vir die 321 leerlinge by die skool.

    Die skoolhoof, me. Lourencia Ganinas, vertel dat die skool daarop uit is om hul gemeenskap te dien. Brandberg se doel is dus om gehalte-onderrig te bied en sodoende produktiewe, verantwoordelike en gedissiplineerde individue in die land uit te stuur. “Ons by Brandberg streef met ons hele harte daarna om ‘n ferm basis vir kinders se onderrig te skep waarop hulle hul lewens kan bou,” het Ganinas gesê.

    Volgens Ganinas is die skool uniek in die sin dat hulle ‘n tuiste weg van die huis is vir baie leerlinge wat dikwels uit moeilike omstandighede kom. “Daar is baie liefde en omgee by ons skool,” het Ganinas gesê. Die skool is nie net ‘n tuiste vir die kinders nie, maar ook vir die onderwysers. Me. Magdelena Afrikaaner is al vir meer as 30 jaar werksaam by die skool. Afrikaaner, wat op Uis gebore en getoë is, sê dat sy die gemeenskap se belange op die hart dra, vandaar haar besluit om so lank by die skool en in die dorpie aan te bly.

    Soos by enige goeie skool, is daar by Laerskool Brandberg streng disiplinêre strukture in plek. Een so ‘n struktuur is die reflektiewe benadering waar leerlinge moet dink oor hul verkeerde dade. “Die leerling wat oortree het, moet dan ‘n plegtige belofte aflê om die oortreding te probeer regstel en ook om dit nie weer te doen nie,” verduidelik Ganinas.

    Laerskool Brandberg het hierdie jaar twee interne leeskompetisies op hul skoolkalender. Die eerste kompetisie, vir graad 1 tot graad 3, het op 13 Junie plaasgevind en die tweede een is geskeduleer vir 25 Junie. Met die oog op holistiese ontwikkeling is daar ook kulturele aktiwiteite op die kalender soos hul kultuurdag op 21 Junie en ‘n koorkompetisie op 28 Junie. Mnr en Mej. Laerskool Brandberg gaan plaasvind op 26 Julie.

    Urikhos Gladest, die hoofmeisie, het ‘n unieke siening van haar skool. Sy sê dat haar skool bewus is van hul diversiteit en ten spyte daarvan steeds een doelwit in sig het en dit is om die Namibiese kind se opvoeding te verseker. “Ek sien hierdie jaar uit daarna dat die kinders goeie punte sal behaal aan die einde van die jaar. Al wat ons moet doen, is hard werk en kophou,” meen Gladest. Die hoofseun, Tjiveze Santiago, beoog om hierdie jaar sy deel te doen om sy nalatenskap by die skool is verseker. “Hierdie jaar wil ek graag ‘n groentetuin vir die skool begin, in samewerking met die skool se voedingskema,” vertel Santiago trots. Die gedugte span van die leerlingraad wil ook meer doen vir die skool in terme van die omgewing en ‘n boomplanting-veldtog.

    Volgens Clarentia Kharuchas, een van die Lewensvaardighede-onderwysers by die skool, is dwelmisbruik een van die grootse probleme wat hulle ervaar. “Ons probeer so veel as moontlik om die kinders te leer hoe om groepsdruk te weerstaan,” verduidelik Kharuchas. Dit blyk dat almal by die skool toegewy daaraan is om Laerskool Brandberg se naam hoog te hou, deur hard te werk en uitnemendheid op al die vlakke van onderrig toe te pas.

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